(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Blade Magazine"

imjl 



SHARPENING TIPS FROM THE PROS 



8 



ircai 




Time-Honored 



Huxafl^Jtf ai»33 








Tk& lH/ferno, O/taxtioa/L 
foLder by 'K.Uby Lcuvwbwt 



\ 



Wk 



More Chop, Less Chi 



BLADE Salutes 
The Top Makers 



$4.99 U.S.A. 



$6.99 CAN. 

02 



"71486"50251' 






#6418 (EX10096 SS) 

Small 

Texas Toothpick 

• Deep Blue Azurite Handle 

• Long Clip Blade 

• 3" closed 

• Mfg. List 11235.00 



Exotic 
Azurite 

From the mines of Arizona, Case has found its next 
exotic handle material - Azurite. This carbonate 
mineral is found in the upper oxidised portions of 
copper ore deposits. Deep Blue (Azure) in color, this 
popular mineral owes its powerful appearance to the 
presence of copper, a strong coloring agent. Each 
handle is made of Azurite, Malachite and 
Chrysocolla along with a banded inlay of Red Coral 
and Mother-of-Pearl. Each pattern will have a total 
production in 2005 of only 500 pieces. Just in time 
for Christmas, these beautiful exotic patterns won't 
last long! Order early! 

1 



I 




; 



iAjj 








$ 149 99 




#6421 (EX185 SS) 

Doctor's 

• Deep Blue Azurite 

• Spear Blade 

• 3/4" closed 

• Mfg. List $260.00 



Knife 

Handle 



#6419 (EX2154 SS) 

Tevy Trapper 

• Deep Blue Azurite Handle 

• Clip and Spey Blades 

• 2%" closed 

• Mfg. List $237.00 



#6420 (EX220 SS) 

Peanut 

• Deep Blue Azurite Handle 

• Clip and Pen Blades 

• 2%" closed 

• Mfg. List $235.00 \ 



J,,: 



Due to limited 

availability 

and tight 

production 

schedules all 

orders will be 

shipped by 

earliest 
order date. 




#6422 (EX468 SS) 

Small Congress 

• Deep Blue Azurite Handle 

• Spear, Coping, Sheepfoot 
and Pen Blades 

• 3'X" closed 

• Mfg. List $260.00 



TO ORDER CALL 




#6417 (EX254 SS) 

Trapper 

• Deep Blue Azurite Handle 

• Clip and Spey Blades 

• 4'X" closed 

• Mfg. List $270.00 



1-888-4CASE XX or 1-800-727-4643 

TOLL FREE • 7 DAYS A WEEK 8-8 • We're on the Web!!! www.casexx.com & www.shepherdhiUscutlery.com 

Home Office: Lebanon, MO 
Additional Locations Include: Osage Beach, MO • Branson, MO • Eddyville, KY • Gretna, NE • Tunica, MS • Nashville, TN 



Designers of Swords & Medieval Weaponry 



^VU»^ ^J 




Since 1994 



I 



Real 



tfllrafl 

ft 



Hunting 

■^' 1 1 V v-5 Introducing our 



u*--^ 



New #1028Damascas 
Stag Handled Dagger! 

The ultimate historical dagger! ! 



#1022 
Elite Damas r; » c 



. lunter! 



New 

#1 026 Premium Point 

Damascas Hunting Knife 



New 
' #1 024 Precise Skinner Damascas Knife 



1028 







X 



Stag Hunting Cutlery Made in the USA 
More of our exclusive lines : 

Riffc 

Battle Ready Steel Swords Hand Forged? I Fum 



IV H 



Battle Ready Steel Swords Hand Forged ? I Furn 

"HvHt€R, Spet ,. Quality Swords, Armour, Helm: 

lentics Collection ™ chainmailJewelry - Crossbows < 



ati&hf 



773-775-3888 



DEALER 

INQUIRES 

MEICOMEL 




5696 N Northwest Hwy. Dept BL50, Chicago, IL 60646 USA 

)88 Fax 773-775-3339 Visit us at www.KnightsEdge.com 



February 2006 



THE WORLD'S #1 KNIFE PUBLIC AT I 



■^ 



12 






1 


■** ■-* .^aaV ■ T 






j 


4 


/ BLADE 


^H 



1 2 The New Wave of Tactical Folder Makers 

Consider some up-and-comers who are hot and getting hotter. By Mike Haskew 

1 8 Blazin 1 a Trail to BLADE Show West 

Portland shines sharp for its newest knife show. By Joe Kertzman 

26 Look for the Little Men in the Knives 

Meet South African sensation Theuns Prinsloo. By Don Guild 

30 Taking Tradition to the Masses 

Factory knives with a time-honored Japanese look are multiplying. By Mike Haskew 

42 More Chop, Less Chip 

Carbon steels are a high-performance alternative. By Steve Shackleford 

50 Dagger of Bastogne 

The author creates a steel tribute to the Battle of the Bulge. By Murad Sayen 

60 V for Victory 

Regard pioneer maker A.G. Bimson and his vintage combat knives. By Marv Clyncke 

66 Fixed, Functional, Aesthetic— And 
Affordable 

Discover Sam Butler before everybody else does. By Les Robertson 

72 How to Drill Pearl Without Chipping It 

Drilling mother-of-pearl can be hazardous — and tricky, too. By Joe Szilaski 

90 Gift from a Hero 

Making Jake Cook's final present was a privilege and an honor. By Eldon Perkins 

1 00 Most Comprehensive Knife Book 
Ever? 

BLADE's Guide To Knives & Their Values is available now! By BLADE® staff 

1 08 How Many Passes Does it Take? 

Go beyond a certain point and you needlessly remove metal. By David Rhea 

116 The 2005 BLADEhandmade Awards 

They reflect some of the handmade industry's finest. By BLADE staff 



blademag.com 



FEBRUARY 2006 




is extraordinary 

edition is one 

le finest offerings in 

the rich history of the 

William Henry Studio. 

5 The integral frame is built 

from solid copper-niobium 

-w billet, salvaged from the 

andofied 'super-collider project. This 

exquisite material, bias cut, 

creates an unprecedented tapestry in 

■asting metals that belongs among the 

most elite patterned material in the world. 

■ v "vanished with premium black-lip pearl inlays and 

WP -"* accents, and sporting our exclusive ZDP-189 

laminated blade at HRC-67. 

£V Limited edition of 100 numbered pieces - available late 

fall/winter 2005 through William Henry and our authorized dealers. 



eaders Respo 

' Cover Story 

10 Unsheathed 

\ The Knife I Carry 

38 Guild Directions 

58 Where To Net 'Em 

77 BLADE Shoppe 

84 BLADE List 

84 Classified Ads 

85 Ad Index 

86 What's New 
88 Knifemaker Showcase 

94 Show Calendar 

95 Where To Get 'Em 

95 Next In BLADE® 

96 My Mentor Knifemaker 
98 Spec Sheet: TOPS MT-2 1 
104 Your Knife Rights 

122 Hot Handmade 



To learn more, contact our studio or your 
local William Henry Authorized Dealer. / * 



C~j& William Henry 

\^fj PINE K- N I t V E S 

www.williamnejWykrirves.com 

503.434.9700 888.563.4500 

KNIFEM.AKING@ 





FEBRUARY 2006 blademag.com 



BLADE / 5 







readers respond 



This Is Your Column! And we want to know what you think. 
Do you like what you've read in BLADE®? Do you have a 
complaint? A suggestion? An opinion you'd like to share with 
the largest knife audience in the world? Mail your comments 



to: BLADE, P.O. Box 789, Ooltewah, TN 37363-0789, or visit 
our website: www.blademag.com or e-mail: blademagazine® 
krause.com. We reserve the right to edit your comments to fit 
the space available. 



ZDP Correction 

The story on stainless steels in the January 
BLADE® ("It's a Question of Balance") 
is very interesting, but I discovered an error 
in two places in the article. In referring to 
ZDP-189/ATS-34, it says that Spyderco 
used this combo. My Spyderco Calypso Jr. 
is ZDP- 189/420 J2. As a result, the mention 
of which ZDP combo William Henry Knives 
uses is probably incorrect also. 

Al Laliberte, a letter from the Internet 

Editor's note: Mr. Laliberte is correct. At 
the time the story was written, a Spyderco 
official said plans were for Spyderco to 
laminate some of its ZDP-189 blades with 
ATS-34. However, after the story went to 
press and in the case of the Delica, the 
decision was made for Spyderco to go with 
a solid piece of ZDP-189. At press time, the 
ZDP-189 Delicas were slated to be avail- 
able for public consumption in January. 
As for William Henry Knives, it also uses a 
ZDP-189/420 J2 laminate, as well as what 
WHK's Matt Conable calls "a 45-layer 
damascus featuring a ZDP core, and alter- 
nating layers of stainless and nickel for 
contrast and tensile strength. This 'Wave' 
damascus is patent pending for WHK." 

He Led By Doing 

Your article on D.E. "Ed" Henry in 
the September BLADE ("Should D.E. 
Henry Be In The Cutlery Hall Of Fame?") 
prompted lots of memories, not just for 
me but for a lot of others judging by the 
responses you have printed in "Readers 
Respond" over the past few issues. 

My own experiences with him were 
also mixed, as were those of a number 
of your respondents. He was pleasant at 
first, friendly and sharing of information, 
holding back no "trade secrets" about his 
materials and methods. He named a price 
for the knife I liked, which happened to be 
"just like one recently ordered by the chief 
of the Los Angeles fire department." He 
accepted my deposit, held the price to the 
original quote, and delivered the knife on 
time with no hassle. 

However, there was an abrupt change at 
the point when I made a suggestion regard- 
ing the purchase of the Grenadilla wood 
that he used on his handles. He told me 



in no uncertain terms that he needed no 
advice, and please not to bother him again 
unless I wanted to order another knife. 

Most people who dealt with him have 
stories of this sort. But now I see that the 
issue has become one of how to take into 
account his behavior versus his contribu- 
tion to knifemaking. I say that the personal- 
ity should not be the issue — after all, we 
cannot psychoanalyze or reform the dead. 
Consider instead what he did for the field. 

Much of Henry's productive career was 
during a time when handmade knives were 
not so much in vogue as they have been 
since. Economic conditions were not as 
good then as they are today when the trade 
is flourishing by comparison, and he had to 
struggle to earn even minimum wage for 
his output. Others might have found him 
to be inconsistent in his business practices, 
but I could name several makers from his 
time who were less than stellar or perhaps 
just inattentive to these aspects of customer 
relations. What I noticed at about the time 
Blade Magazine Cutlery Hall-Of-Famer© 
Bill Moran introduced his damascus blades 
at the 1973 Guild Show — when the Guild 
started to gain acceptance and prices for 
handmades began to take off — was that 
Henry appeared to start raising his prices 
drastically compared to what he had been 
charging earlier. 

He was pretty opinionated but many 
knifemakers are proud of their knowledge 
and achievements — it is just that some are 
more gracious in how they express their 
views. He could be abrupt or unpredict- 
able, but we do not know what experience 
brought him to what he was or caused him 
to react the way he could. Bottom line, I 
suggest that he be judged on the basis of his 
contributions to knifemaking rather than on 
whether he had a pleasing personality. 

Henry worked hard at what he did. He 
benefited from the expertise of noted bowie 
collector and authority Bob Abels, who 
shipped him boxes of antique bowies from 
his collection, bowies D.E. was allowed to 
examine and return to Bob at his leisure. 
As a result, Henry developed a number 
of designs that set a standard for aesthetic 
appeal, attention to detail, and quality of 
finish to which many of today's makers 
aspire or mimic. 

He pioneered the use of the nickel- 
silver throat and tip on leather Sheffield- 
style sheaths for modern bowies. He 



devised hunting and hideout knives with 
which most collectors today are unfamiliar. 
He used the best commercially available 
steel for his blades. He had them commer- 
cially heat treated, thereby avoiding the 
quality-control issues associated with the 
hit-and-miss backyard heat treating of the 
day. And he had his blades Magnaflux® 
tested to detect any inherent flaws from the 
steel production or the heat treating. 

In short, Henry led by doing. His manner 
did not please everybody he met but he did 
make excellent knives. I suggest we should 
leave the popularity contests to the folks who 
run for public office and give D.E. due credit 
for his leadership as a knife craftsman. 

It might also be noted that Henry's 
knives were 100 percent handmade by him. 
He hand ground them, filed them, progres- 
sively sanded them to final dimension, and 
hand rubbed them for final finish and to 
exacting dimensions. He did not use any 
hired help to speed production. In short, his 
products were his own, and he invested the 
sweat and care to make as good a knife as 
he could using his own skill and labor. 

Larry W Williams, a letter from the Internet 

MIM For Handles 

The story in the January BLADE on 
Kershaw's innovative use of Metal 
Injection Molding (MIM) for knife blades 
was very informative. However, I fear that 
it could mislead readers to think that MIM 
for knife parts in general is totally new. 
Benchmade used MIM for the titanium 
handles on its Model 31 in 2001. In fact, at 
the time, those knife handles were the larg- 
est and most complex parts ever made from 
titanium by the MIM process, putting that 
knife truly on the cutting edge. 

Chuck Gollnick, Sherwood, Oregon 

Editor's note: If the BLADE story created 
the impression that MIM for knife parts is 
entirely new, we stand corrected. However, 
we also stand by the assertion that Kershaw 
is believed to be the first manufacturer to 
produce a knife with an MIM blade — which 
includes not only the shape of the blade 
but the grinds and contours as well. As the 
story stresses, it represents a truly revolu- 
tionary step in the knife industry. 



6 / BLADE 



blademag.com 



FEBRUARY 2006 




cover story 



Kirby Lambert is riding the crest 
of the new wave of tactical-folder 
makers, and an excellent example of his 
work is his latest piece, the Inferno. "The 
Inferno has just overtaken Kirby's smaller 
Spearpoint as his most popular model," 
purveyor Neil Ostroff noted. 

Sporting a handrubbed, 3 -inch blade of 
CPM S30V stainless steel, the Inferno has 
a gracefully contoured handle of desert tan 
G-10 contrasted by carbon- fiber bolsters. 
The multiple-ground, recurve blade shows 
the influence of one of Kirby's mentors 
and his fellow Canadian, Greg Lightfoot. 
Kirby's list price: $425. 

"The Inferno is 
Kirby's most 
popular model." 

—Neil Ostroff 

For more information about the cover 
knife, contact Kirby Lambert, Dept. BL2, 
536 College Ave., Regina, Saskatch- 
ewan S4N 03X Canada 306.737.2333 
kirby@lambertknives.com. 

For more on today's up-and-coming 
makers of tactical folders, see the story on 
page 12. 

The cover knife is courtesy of True 
North Knives. 

The cover photo is by Bob Best. 



kwfe SHARPENING TIPS FROM THE PROS 








I'll 


-.' ■ .. j -s &i >:.,'■- 


Jl >Ui;^SJl-:r*JijjJ 


.^W 


Tit Kfune,*<A£tU*t 


W&kfi.% 


Pt 




Time-Honored 1 

Japanese Knives 


* \ 




CARBON STEELS 






More Chop, Less Chip 






fiUOfSalutes 1 


i in ii "".^ < 


| 


The Top Makers I 






J^ 






^^^lu""^ v^utjfenxj LomjDaruj 



4th Edition President's Choice 
Robert J. Breton 



2004 

Baby Sunfish 

Mother of Pearl 






MSRP $279.90 

Limited Edition 1 of 400 



Includes a beautiful one-of-a-kind walnut 

presentation box with a signed letter of 

authenticity by Robert J. Breton 



This knife is the fourth edition in a series of the President's Choice. 
American pride and craftsmanship are just two of the reasons why Robert J. 
Breton made this choice. 

Presentation grade mother of pearl coined end Baby Sunfish (3-5/8" Closed). 
Featuring nickel silver liners with signature bolsters. Gold filled laser 
engraved D2 steel blades, each with its own serial number on the tang. 

Queen Cutlery Company PO Box 500 Franklinville, NY 14737 
800-222-5233 FAX: 800-299-2618 



FEBRUARY 2006 



blademag.com 



BLADE / 7 




4" CPMS30V Hand Rubbed Dagger 

Sculpted Carbon Fiber Overlays 

Tritium™ Inlays 

Titanium Frame Lock 

Spring Assisted Opening SAO 

Plain version - $675 
All Black DLC - S775 

Limited availability: 
First series numbered! 




EXCLUSIVE TO: 

TRUE NORTH KNIVES 



TNK 



Full Time Dealer 




Neil H. Ostroff 514.748.9985 
www.truenorthknives.com 




WORLD'S #1 KNIFE PUBLICATION 



Vol. XXXIII, No. 2, February 2006 



Publishers Of 



World .Knife Collecting & Investing 



Zim 



i 



FT""! 



www.byrdknife.com | 800-525-7770 



700 E. State St., Iola, WI 54990-0001 

715.445.2214 www.blademag.com 

blademagazine@krause.com 



Group Publisher 

Hugh McAloon 

Publisher 

Brad Rucks 

Editor 

Steve Shackleford 

Managing Editor 

Joe Kertzman 

Field Editors 

Ed Fowler, Wayne Goddard, MSG Kim 

Breed, Jerry Fisk, Dexter Ewlng, Hank 

Reinhardt, B.R. Hughes, Lowell Bray, 

Steve Schwarzer, Richard D. White 



Advertising Manager 

Gregg Gutschow 

Advertising Sales 

Missy Beyer, Ext. 642 
Bruce Wolberg, Ext. 403 

A dvertising A ssistan t 

Mary Ann Rice 



Art Director 

Craig Netzer 

Graphic Designer 

Jeromy Boutwell 

F+W Publications, Inc. 

David H. Steward, Chairman & CEO 

Peter Saretsky, EVP, Chief Financial Officer 

Andrew Levy, SVR Development and Strategy 

Barbara Schmitz, VP, Manufacturing 

F+JV Publications, Inc. Magazine Group 

William R. Reed, President 

Susan Du Bois, VP, Consumer Marketing 

Matt Friedersdorf, Director, Business Planning 

Sara Dlmford, Conference Director 

Subscription Services: 800.258.0929 
12 ISSUES $25.98 ABBL63 

BLADE® (ISSN 1064-5853) is published monthly, includ- 
ing the directory and calendar issues, by F+W Publications, 
Inc., 700 E. State St., Iola, WI 54990-001. Periodical postage 
paid at Iola, Wis., and at additional mailing offices. Canadian 
Agreement Number: 40665675. POSTMASTER: Send address 
changes to BLADE. Circulation Department, 700 E. State St., 
Iola, WI 54945. Copyright 2006 by F+W Publications, Inc. 
BLADE and its logo are registered trademarks. Other names 
and logos referred to or displayed in editorial or advertising 
content may be trademarked or copyright. BLADE assumes 
no responsibility for unsolicited materials sent to it. Publisher 
and advertisers are not liable for typographical errors that 
may appear in prices or descriptions in advertisements. The 
possession, transportation and sale of certain types of knives is 
restricted or prohibited by federal, state and local laws. BLADE 
and F+W Publications, Inc. rely upon the fact that collectors, 
dealers, exhibitors, advertisers and manufacturers are expected 
to know and comply with these regulations. 



fiv 



8 / BLADE 



blademag.com 



FEBRUARY 2006 



Double Tree 

BOKER 'S FINEST 



\ 




2525 24DT 







H. BOKER SCO'S 

f IMPROVED 3m£- 
CUTLERY r 






This tang stamp is our 
seal for the very finest. 




The Tree as Boker's trademark is as old as the com- 
pany - 138 years. A real chestnut tree growing close to 
the plant gave Heinrich Boker the idea to choose this 
symbol for quality. Don't forget, back in 1867, Heinrich 
was already exporting to Africa and South America, 
where only a few people could read the company's 
name. Today the Tree logo is worth more than our 
new plant. It is our seal for the product made by us, in 
Solingen, Germany. It guarantees your knife is an 
original Boker. In today's extremely competitive 
environment, ideas, designs, materials and technical 
concepts are routinely stolen. But the Tree Brand is ours 
alone and we protect it as our treasure. 
In an era of cost cutting and mass marketing, the 
Double Tree series reconfirms our ongoing commitment 
to quality. For Double Tree we selected 6 very traditional 
Boker patterns. We will only make 1,000 pieces of each 
pattern, with the choice of 3 handle materials. 
The Trapper (Model 2525) and the Congress (Model 
5464) will be introduced first - 200 pieces in pearl ' 
pieces in sambar stag and 500 pieces in jig — 
bone. The decorative bolsters are castings out 
silver and the Solingen stainless steel blades show o!d 
grinding patterns and are mirror polished. Each knife 
features brass liners and stainless steel springs. 
All knives are presented i 





3 1/2" clip and spey blades. Closed length; 4". 



2525 24DT. Genuine Mother of Pearl handles. $ 199.00 
2525 23DT. Genuine sambar stag handles. $ 179.00 
2525 22DT. Jigged grey bone handles. $ 149.00 




2525 23DT 




»5 22DT 



Congress: 2 sheepfoot, 1 pen, 1 cop 

Closed length: 3 1/4". (not shown) 



i 

' 5464 24DT.Ge 



5464 24DT. Genuine Mother of Pearl handles. $ 19' 
5464 23DT. Genuine sambar stag handles, $ 18 
5464 22DT. Jigged grey bone handles. $ 15 



- - Boker USA, INC. • 1 550 Balsam Street • Lakewood, CO 802 1 4 - 59 1 7 

HOICER Phone 1-303.462.0662 • Fax 1.303 462.0668 • Monday-Friday 8:00 am -4:30 pm |MST| 

BAUMWERK - SOLINGEN Email: sales@bokerusa.com • Website: www.bokerusa.com 




leathed 



nsheathe 



By Steve Shackleford 



ABS Ends Its Cutting Competitions/ 
BLADE Show Cutting Championship 
Will Continue 



According to a letter from Joe Kees- 
lar, chairman of the American Bla- 
desmith Society, the ABS board of 
directors has voted that, as of this past Oct. 
8, the ABS will no longer sponsor or partici- 
pate in cutting competitions. As Joe wrote: 

"We have concluded that the risk of legal 
action against the American Bladesmith 
Society for injury during an ABS-sponsored 
cutting competition has become too great. 
Moreover, there is a fear of liability to the 
ABS for injuries that might occur during 
a cutting competition held by any other 
individual or organization. This was a 
difficult decision to make and was not made 
lightly. An overwhelming majority of the 
board supported the decision but with great 
regret." 

The decision by the ABS will come as 
a surprise to many who have followed the 
cutting-competition phenomenon that has 
flourished in recent years. An outgrowth 
of the ABS' performance tests for its 
journeyman and master smith ratings, the 
cutting competitions have taken on a life of 
their own. 

As early as 1997, the ABS was holding 
the competitions at such venues as its fall 
hammer-in at the Bill Moran School of 
Bladesmithing in Old Washington, Arkansas. 
The Wall Street Journal covered the fall 
hammer-in 's 1998 cutting competition, won 
by Larry Harley. At the 1999 Oregon Knife 
Collectors Association Show, Ed Schempp 
won the show's rope-cutting competition. 

Jump forward to 2002, when Big John 
Fitch won the cutting competition at the 
Batson Bladesmithing Symposium in 
Bessemer, Alabama, and his winning knife 
was featured on the cover of the August 
2002 BLADE®. In 2003, the ABS held the 
first ABS World Championship Cutting 
Competition at the BLADE Show, bringing 
together the top performers from the year's 
cutting competitions at selected ABS 
hammer-ins, with Jim Crowell winning that 
first title. 

In addition, Blade Magazine Cutlery 
Hall-Of-Famer© Bruce Voyles announced 
The International Cutting Competition 
Trail. According to its literature, the ICCT 
is designed to take "cutting competitions 

10 /BLADE 



to markets outside 
knife shows, 
to the sporting 
goods retailers" 
and to "open the 
competition to all 
knifemakers, and, 
most importantly, 
create for non- 
knifemakers a 
category of factory- 
made knives." 

Meanwhile, The 
Knifemakers' Guild 
held its first cutting 
competition at its 
2004 Guild Show, 
and another one at 
this past year's Guild 
Show, with Warren 
Osborne taking 
home the title. And, of course, the ABS 
continued its annual cutting competition 
circuit, culminating in Reggie Barker 
winning the ABS World Championship in 
2004 and 2005, both at the BLADE Show- 
all of which made the ABS' decision to 
no longer sponsor or participate in cutting 
competitions so surprising. 

With the ABS no longer sponsoring 
cutting competitions, here is what happens 
to the ABS World Championship Cutting 
Competition at the BLADE Show. 

The event will continue to be held 
but under a new name: the BLADE Show 
World Championship Cutting Competition. 
As noted in the January BLADE, the 
respective winners of the spring Piney 
Woods Hammer-In and Mid-America 
Bladesmithing Expo cutting competitions, 
Reggie Barker and Dickie Robinson, and the 
winner of the competition at the 2005 Bill 
Moran Bladesmithing Exposition and Knife 
Show qualify for the 2006 BLADE Show 
Championship. In addition, the winners of 
the competitions at the 2005 fall hammer-in 
at Old Washington, Arkansas, and the 2006 
Batson Bladesmithing Symposium April 
7-9 in Bessemer, Alabama, also will qualify. 
(Editor's note: At press time, the Batson 
Bladesmithing Symposium was considering 
opening its cutting competition up to non- 




Along with Reggie Barker and three other qualifiers, Dickie 
Robinson — here cutting the water-filled bottles at last 
year's championship — will vie for the BLADE Show World 
Championship Cutting Competition at the BLADE Show June 16- 
18 at the Cobb Galleria Centre near Atlanta. (Thomason photo) 



bladesmiths. BLADE will keep you posted. 
Meanwhile, the results of the Moran and 
Old Washington events will appear in an 
upcoming BLADE. ) 

Jerry Fisk and other members of the 
competition staff will run the '06 BLADE 
Show World Championship Cutting 
Competition. As for 2007 and beyond, 
plans are for the BLADE Show World 
Championship Cutting Competition to 
continue to bring together top performers 
from selected cutting competitions, including 
both non-bladesmiths and bladesmiths alike. 
Stay tuned for further developments. 

Judy Koval 

It is with great regret that BLADE reports 
the passing of Judy Koval. Along with her 
husband, Mick, Judy operated Koval Knives, 
a leader in the sales of knifemaking supplies 
and equipment in New Albany, Ohio, and 
founded the Greater Ohio Valley Knife Show. 
Judy was an integral part of the family 
that is the handmade knife industry, and her 
smiling face and endearing manner at knife 
shows will be missed. It was only about a 
year ago that Mick passed away as well. 
BLADE extends its heartfelt sympathies to 
the entire Koval family. Future plans for 
Koval Knives were pending at press time. 



blademag.com 



FEBRUARY 2006 



GET YOUR STRIP 



-Ik 




R ANGE R 






• RANGERS LEAD THE WA 





1 



JAL 



UC1441B 
G-10 handle 
Stainless steel blade 
11-3/8" overall 



. • 



IJKHRIJI 
FOLDER 



UC1446B 
G-10 handle 
Stainless steel blade 
Stainless steel pocket clip 
5" closed 




T/lIiYT F«5«i UC1444B 

1 i-m M 1^ MJMj C9 C9 Stainless steel hand 

Iiikw ltl^ D Dlac| e, and pocket cl 
4 UIjIfliIi 5" closed 



)5 United Cutlery Corp. 



1425 United Boulevard, Sevierville, TN 37876 

800-548-0835 Dept. BL02 • FAX 865-428-2267 

www.unitedcutlery.com 



wno^ Hot 




w Consider sotii&ufr'asul-'Comers whose* 
helves are* kot a^aettmq hotter 



By Mike Haskew 





Knifemaker Dave Winch is defining a market 
for very recognizable work, particularly in 
RWL-34 steel, which is popular in his native 
Australia. The 4-inch blade of RWL-34 on his 
combat model is distinguished by multiple 
grinds. The handle is G-10 and the frame, 
lock and clip are titanium. Robertson Cus- 
tom Cutlery's list price: $430. 




Defining the makers of tactical folders 
who are up and coming is not an exact 
science. Like the knives themselves, 
such a label is subject to interpretation. Some 
of the makers may have been in the business 
for a while, their work just now gaining ac- 
claim. Others may have recently arrived on 
the scene, offering new perspectives. 

When asked to define the term, purveyor 
Les Robertson of Robertson Custom Cut- 
lery replied, "I always think of newer mak- 
ers who people are looking for." Conversely, 
purveyor Neil Ostroff of True North Knives 
countered with, "My definition of up and 
coming is one who is poised to break out and 
to really become a household name." 

Based on discussions with collectors and 
purveyors, BLADE® presents some tactical 
folder makers who fit either or both of Rob- 
ertson and Ostroff's definitions. 

Flippin' Out 

Todd Begg is rapidly being recognized for 
what collector Gary Capraro calls some 
"unbelievable" flipper folders. Selling in 
the S500-S950 range, Gary added, Todd's 
work flies off the tables at knife shows na- 
tionwide. 

"Todd is very innovative," Capraro said. 
"He makes some of the best handles I have 
ever seen, and the materials run the gamut 
with primarily CPM S30V steel for blades, 
and carbon fiber and wood inlays in his han- 
dles. He just went full time approximately 
two years ago and also made a couple of push 
daggers for the last Las Vegas show that were 
phenomenal. His stuff is very cool — and 
gaining ground." 

According to purveyor Michael Donate, 
Todd has struck a chord with collectors. "His 
designs are so cutting edge, the way the 
knife fits in your hand is like an extension 
of your arm," Donato observed. "His work is 
well balanced and these are definitely using 
knives. He has been the first to use a carbon 
fiber that has metal in it [at press time the 
only knife Todd had made with the material 
was a fixed blade, not a folder]." The mate- 



rial is also used in aircraft construction and 
grounds the electricity if the aircraft is struck 
by lightning. As a result, Todd is calling it 
"Lightning Strike Carbon Fiber." Its official 
name, the maker added, is IWWF for "inter- 
woven wire fiber." 

A full-time knifemaker since 1999, Ne- 
braska's Charles Marlowe sells tactical fold- 
ers in ATS-34 and CPM S30V steels. "His 
work is equal to the majority of the better- 
known tactical folder makers out there," Rob- 
ertson noted. "He has excellent fit and finish 
in several different designs and can work a 
variety of blade steels. At $400 to $450 de- 
pending on the materials used, the knives are 
an excellent value for the money." Marlowe 



is also recognized as a proficient maker of 
butterfly knives, Robertson added. 

The fascination with flippers continues, 
and Donato says that D.B. Fraley is "giving 
the people what they want. He has found a 
niche in the market." D.B. sells tactical fold- 
ers in the $450-$500 range, and incorporates 
a variety of anodized colors in his titanium 
framelocks and locking liners. "He won best 
tactical knifemaker at the 2004 Guild Show," 
Robertson said, "and his flippers open ex- 
tremely smooth." 

A protege of knifemaker Ken Onion 
and a one-time member of the research and 
development team at Kershaw Knives, Tim 
Galyean has exhibited his mentor's influence 




Two of Todd Begg's hottest pieces are his Glimpse and Pantera, tactical folders 
with higher-end materials. Todd compares the knives to civilian Humvees in that 
they have an "off-road, tactical purpose with a leather interior." His list price for the 
Glimpse in a Timascus handle (top) is $850 and in the Texture Tech grip (bottom) is 
$950. His list price for the Pantera (middle), also in Texture Tech, is $850. Blade steel 
is CPM S30V. More recently, at BLADE Show West, Todd displayed a new butterfly 
knife that turned some heads. (SharpByCoop.com photo) 



FEBRUARY 2006 



blademag.com 



BLADE/ 13 




For nearly 
40 years, the 
place to sell 
or buy that 
special 
handmade, 
antique or 
collectible 
knife. 



Contact Sara at 
ce_info@cuttingedge.com 

ph. (479)631-0055 

Cuttingedge.com 
% A.G. Russell Knives 
2900 S. 26th St. 
Rogers, AR 72758 



53 

cuttingeHge.com 



(479) 631-0055 

Dept.# H0206 



1 



_7, 



.[fo@£ 





"Torrent" in CPM S30V and 



a titanium handle with a 
? "torched" frame, was nai 
best tactical knifemaker at 
the 2004 Knifemakers' Guild 
Show. Closed length: 5 
inches. (Lum photo) 



but is also beginning to find his own expres- 
sive path. 

"He hasn't made a lot of knives but the 
ones he has made have been mind blowing," 
Capraro asserted. "You can see some of On- 
ion's influence in the detail Tim pays to fit 
and finish, but the style is definitely unique. 
Right now Tim is specializing in flippers, 
and he has been getting $550 to $600 [per 
knife] routinely. As far as collectors go, we 



recognize talent very quickly, and the sec- 
ondary market on Galyean's knives is already 
about $1,000 [per knife] due to scarcity and 
people absolutely recognizing talent." 

The Thinker 

Canadian Kirby Lambert is high on Ostroff 's 
list of up and comers. Lambert counts Greg 
Lightfoot and Brian Lyttle as his mentors, 
and recently the trio put together a DVD 




14/ BLADE 



blademag.com 



FEBRUARY 2006 




rGiwirM£»xtc^rA^ pf crE' *— 



i l|IH>l I><| 




Dealers call or visit www.mgegroup.com 
for pricing 



Steve Rhodes 

800-734-5965 

Tom Wilkeson 

800-728-9208 



Kevin Stanley 

800-563-3345 

Jim Hansen 

888-270-0880 



Midwest Gun Exchange 

is a full line Microtech 
Distributor stocking all 
production Microtech knives 
as well as customs, limited 
editions and exclusive runs. 



www, 



.com 




showcasing their work, shop tours, and even 
what they do in their spare time. 

"This shows that Kirby is a thinker," 
stated Ostroff, who provides the introduction 
for the DVD. "He is a young man under 30, 
and he incorporates a Japanese flair into his 



tactical folder work. He's an accomplished 
Japanese-style fixed-blade maker, and in the 
last two years he has entered into the tactical 
folder market. His knives are a touch of class 
but not too pretty that one would be afraid 
to use them. His knives are priced at $425 



to $475 and he uses carbon fiber, titanium, 
S30V, stainless damascus, and mokume." 

With prices ranging from $1,100 to 
$3,000, Jeff Harkins bumps the higher end 
in tactical folders, while his blend of aesthet- 
ics and technical know-how have generated 




»r^Qvcb^@^s e 



xclusive designs by 



NEW THIN A-0K KNIVES 

Since we introduced the assisted-opening knife 
concept almost a decade ago, we have expanded 
our A-0K (assisted-opening knife) line and now 
we are proud to present, in Blackie's own words, 
"the best mechanism yet for this type of folder!" 



~>(J»cbi2.@«&*S* 



R-OK 



latest design: 



Rs sis ted Opening Knife 




MEYERCO 



4481 Exchange Service Dr. • Dallas, TX 75236 "214-467-8949 
www.meyercousa.com 



16/ BLADE 



blademag.com FEBRUARY 2006 



high demand. 

"He specializes in tactical automat- 
ics, and they are what I would consider the 
Sherman tank of knives," Donato explained. 
"Holding one of them in your hand tells you 
that it can be used for multiple purposes be- 
sides cutting. These are built perfectly, and 
there's a great deal of attention to fit, finish, 
detail and design. He makes one knife called 
the Alpha, and although it's the same basic 
shape, he makes different cuts and facets on 
the knife, blending engineering and art. He 
made one knife that he spent 110 hours just 
doing the polishing." 

A pair of second-generation knifemakers 
have come into their own, Ostroff maintained. 
Chris Smith, son of John W. Smith, and Ryan 
Bailey, son of Darrel Ralph, are selling their 
work briskly at around $400 to $450 per knife. 
Each has benefited from working with his fa- 
ther, sharing shop space and utilizing some of 
the best equipment around. 

"Chris learned from his father what qual- 
ity is and what it means to put your name on 
a knife," Neil said. "Along with knifemaking 
skills, Darrel has also been teaching Ryan 
business ethics, and that's really important. I 
mentioned makers who are poised and ready 
to break out, and Ryan is one of those who 
will be breaking out with designs of his own 
by early 2006." 

Knifemaker Dave Winch is defining a 
market for very recognizable work, particu- 
larly in RWL-34 steel, which is popular in 
his native Australia. "He's doing exceptional 
blade grinds," Robertson commented, "in- 
cluding very nice fit and finish in the handle, 
and the lockup is good. His knives are selling 
for $400 to $430, and there is a very unique 
look to his work. I had some of his knives at 
shows recently, and people came up and said, 
'Is this a Winch?'" 

A few others to watch in the tactical 
folder market include young maker Jer- 
emy Krammes, whose pieces are selling for 
around $375 each; Matthew Lerch, already 
known for gent's knives but making noise 
with carbon fiber and Damasteel damascus 
at $550 per piece; ABS master smith Wally 
Hayes, who recently has made a move into 
folders that probably will be snapped up 
quickly; Warren Thomas, an established 
maker whose blend of traditional styles and 
modern techniques, along with material in- 
novations such as fusing carbon fiber with 
titanium, promise a high demand (see the 
cover of the December BLADE); and veteran 
Rick Hinderer, whose most recent designs 
have created considerable interest among 
tactical folder enthusiasts. 

Value Tips 

Establishing a value for an up-and-comer's 
work is very much a relative exercise. Just 
what a knife is worth rests largely with the 
preference of the individual considering 
the purchase. 

One item of note is that scarcity can play 
a part in demand, initial purchase price and 




Another second-generation maker of tactical folders purveyor Neil Ostroff said 
to watch is Ryan Bailey, son of Darrel Ralph. Father and son collaborated on this 
upscale tactical in Mike Norris stainless damascus, and white and black-lip mother- 
of-pearl. (SharpByCoop.com photo) 



secondary market value. Some tactical folder 
makers may produce less than 20 knives in 
a calendar year, generating a demand that 
is difficult to satisfy, accompanied by ever- 
escalating resale values. Depending on the 
maker, be prepared to pay a premium or to 



endure a long wait. 

For the contact information for the makers 
in the story, see "Where To Get 'Em" on 
page 95. 




The Wild Weasel™ is part of our new CRKT USA line featuring Tailwind™ assisted opening 
(patent pending) . Designed by Pat & Wes Crawford, it is an open build InterFrame locking 
liner folder made in the U.S A The Tailwind speed assist technology is ingeniously simple, 
strong and lightweight. Its over-center cam/ spring design holds the folder securely closed. 
When either of the dual thumb studs is rotated outward 30°, the Tailwind spring instanuy 
rotates the blade to full open and locked position. The modified drop point blade is 
premium 154 CM stainless steel. Both Razor-Sharp and Combined Razor-Sharp & 
Triple-Point™ Serrated cutting edged models are available. The scales are 6061 aluminum, 
hard anodized gray with black Santoprene inserts, it's all here: speed, design, quality and 
value 



FOR THOSE WHO 
DEMAND VALUE. 



Columbia River Knife iTool- 9720 S. W. Hillman Court, Suite 805 
Wilsonville, Oregon 97070 USA -Tel: 503/685-5015 -Toll free: 1-800-891-3100 
Fax: 503/682-9680 • E-mail: info@crkt.com • Web: www.crkt.com 



FEBRUARY 2006 



blademag.com 



BLADE/ 17 



uv 



^ 



«^ 



% 



& 







\ 



P 



Through sales Rim foot trrffic, 

PORTLRRD PROVED OP TO THE TASK OF 

hostirg BLRDE Show West 



\ A 



--iv v 



HV 



&W£ 



\i\V 



^ 



W 



\ 



m 



•^ 







\ 






x 



^ 




«s. < 



\ 






-vSi 



% 



By Joe Kertzman 



ichards garnered the Best Fixed Blade 
award at the show for a coffin-handle bowie that 
sports a 12-inch, rolled-mosaic-damascus blade, a 
nitre-blued and sculpted damascus guard, a mast- 
odon-ivory handle, and a silicon-bronze spacer and 
pins. (BladeGallery.com [knife] photo) 



blademag.com FEBRUARY 2006 



^^ o rain delays dampened the spirits of 
f M BLADE Show West attendees. The 
■ C westerly winds blew knife enthusiasts 
into town for the launching of BLADE'S' s 
first-ever knife show in Portland, Oregon. 
Though it rained "cuts and dags" the entire 
weekend, no one drowned, and some of the 
sharpest-dressed knives and their makers 
were the talk of the town. 

It didn't take long for money to start ex- 
changing hands, either. Knife purveyor Paul 
Basch counts John W. Smith and Willy Ri- 
gney knives among those he sold. "At this 
show, there were beautiful knives," Basch 
says. "I sold three $2,000 knives. You drew 
a crowd on Saturday, and that's the biggest 
thing. I'm at the show to sell knives, and I 
sold knives." 

Basch was also there to buy knives, and 
he managed to do a little shopping. One 
such purchase was from knifemaker Wade 
Tiensvold. 

"I liked his knives — the excitement of 
finding a nice knife turns me on. This one 
had a fossilized-oosic handle and a [fire- 
storm-pattern] damascus blade. It was just 
a good-looking knife. I didn't even hesitate. 
When I saw it, I bought it," Basch says. 
"Knifemakers have to make money and sell 
some knives, and I buy them." 

Knife purveyor Jeff Stover of Collectors' 
Gallery in Torrance, California, sold several 
W.D. Pease knives, a couple of pieces by 
the late Harvey McBurnette, and said he did 
some knife trading with collectors and dealers 
there. "I did good at the show," Stover, who's 
been a purveyor for over 20 years, notes. "It 
was a good show that way. I bought a few 
Pease pieces, some [Mel] Pardue knives and 
a couple Jack Busfield interframes." 

Of the knifemakers exhibiting at the 
show, Stover particularly appreciated the 
work of Steve Rapp, Todd Begg and Mike 
Zscherny. "Rapp is a master. The guy is a 
perfectionist," Stover remarks. "Zscherny 
had nice folders on his table that 1 enjoyed 
looking at. His folding-knife actions are 




like glass — the function is fantastic — and 
design-wise, he has great ideas. Begg is an- 
other one with great designs." 

It was such innovative and well-ex- 
ecuted knives that helped some knifemakers 
win the 2005 BLADE Show West custom 
knife awards. The custom knife awards and 
the 2005 BLADEhandmade™ Awards (the 
latter of which are covered on page 1 16 of 




this issue) were presented during a ceremony 
the Friday night of the show. (See the side- 
bar below for a complete list of the BLADE 
Show West custom knife award winners.) 

The Best Folder award went to a hot new 
name in the knife industry. Ford Swauger, 
who created quite a stir with his folding 
knife mechanisms and a handsome "cut 'n 
shoot" pistol knife he displayed at his table. 
"Coming up with new mechanisms fasci- 
nates me," Swauger, who's been building 
knives since 1994, says. 



BLADE Show West Custom 
Knife Award Winners 



Best In Show — Steven Rapp 

Best Damascus — Vince Evans 

Best Miniature — Joe Szilaski 

Best Utility Hunter — Thad Buchanan 

Best Fixed Blade — Chuck Richards 

Best Fighter — Jon Christensen 

Best Non-Damascus Handforged 

Knife— Ed Caffrey 

Best Fantasy Knife — Frank Gamble 

Best Art Knife — Steven Rapp 

Best New Maker — David Lang 

Best Folder — Ford Swauger 



FEBRUARY 2006 



blademag.com 



BLADE/ 19 




JOIN some of the 

WORLD'S FINEST 

Knifemaker/Artisans 

February 18th-19th, 2006 

Silverado Resort & Country Club 
in the heart of the Napa Valley 



Saturday: From 10 AM - 5 PM 

• Knifemakers' & Artists' Displays, 
Offering Buying Opportunities 

• Seminars & Sharpening Demos - Led 
by Bob Kramer and Murray Carter 

• Judging of Artisans' Objects for Awards 



Sunday: From 10 AM - 3 PM 

• Knifemakers' & Artists' Displays, 
Offering Buying Opportunities 

• Drawings for multiple valuable Objects 

• Prior to the Show: Jot Singh Khalsa 
will lead a Yoga-Stretching Hour 



Saturday, from 7 PM on: Awards Banquet & Damascus Round Table 
Chaired by Daryl Meier and Bill Fiorini 





Attending Makers/Exhibitors 




Gaetan Beauchamp 


Bill Burke 


Murray Carter 


Kevin Cashen 


Darriel Caston 


Don Cowles 


John Davis 


Christoph Deringer 


Adam DesRosiers 


Matt Diskin 


Tom Ferry 


Bill Fiorini 


Ric Furrer 


Chantal Gilbert 


Thomas Haslinger 


JP Holmes 


Jot Singh Khalsa 


Todd Kinnikin 


Daniel Koster 


Bob Kramer 


Jerry McClure 


Daryl Meier 


Mardi Meshejian 


Mike Mooney 


Rob Patton 


Dan Pfanenstiel 


Kirk Rexroat 


James Rodebaugh 


Charles Sauer 


Karl Schroen 


John M. Smith 


Bob Weinstock 


Owen Wood 


Tim Wright 


BladeGallery.Com 


KnifePurveyor.Com 



One-day Pass: $9.00 - Two-day Pass: $15.00 
All Events Pass - including Banquet & Round Table: $85.00 

Visit our Web site @ www.collectors-show.com 

For additional Show Information, please contact: 
John Greene @ 530-637-5387 • email: collectorsshow@foothill.net 
Accepting Artists' Applications/Work to be juried for next Year's Show... 

We look forward to seeing you in Napa for this unique Event!!! 

The Collectors Show 



^trufgitig Jlrl and Culinary Worttfs with { Fine Cutkry 




show pieces 



Dial Up an Edge 

His award- winning folder sports a 4 1/2- 
inch damascus blade, damascus bolsters, a 
giraffe-bone handle and titanium liners. The 
double-action folder features a dial under- 
neath the front bolster that allows the blade 
to be opened automatically. With knife in 
hand, by turning the dial backward, toward 
the grip, the blade opens automatically. By 
turning the dial forward, it unlocks the blade 
and allows it to be closed. The blade can also 
be opened manually, without using the dial. 
The maker's list price: $2,000. 

"Winning the award meant a whole heck 
of a lot more to me than selling the knives 
I sold," Swauger says. "My wife was more 
ecstatic than I was. It's just nice to know that 
you won an award for something you did, 
and that you were in competition with guys 
known for making excellent knives." 

While at BLADE Show West, Swauger 
says he visited factory knife booths, talking 
to company representatives about the pos- 
sibility of collaborting on knife designs. "I 
talked to two companies while 1 was there," 
he notes. "I think the factories have a place at 
BLADE Show West. Their presence draws 
more people into the show. There may be 
attendees who visit the show to see the fac- 
tory knives, and some of them will likely 
convert to collecting handmade knives. I 
was glad to see the factories there." 

With so many knife companies located 
in Oregon, and several in the greater Port- 
land area, there was a greater factory pres- 
ence at BLADE Show West in 2005 than in 
previous years. Of the 22 booths around the 
perimeter of the show floor, 14 of them were 
occupied by knife manufacturers. 

One handmade knife that made an im- 
pression on Swauger is a fixed blade forged 
by Jon Christensen with what Ford describes 
as an "eye-popping damascus blade." The 
"Leaf Bowie," a fighter with leaf shapes in 
the steel, won Best Fighter at the show. It 
sports an 8 3/8-inch mosaic-damascus blade, 
a wrought-iron guard and an oil-finished wal- 
nut handle. The maker's list price: $1,200. 

"It's satisfying to be recognized by your 
peers, real flattering. It gets you pumped up," 
Christensen, an ABS journeyman smith, 
says. "I've been developing the leaf-pattern 
damascus for about three years, and I've fi- 
nally gotten to the point where people recog- 
nize it for what it is. That's rewarding." 

Christensen carpooled from Montana to 
Portland with three other knifemakers — Ed 
Caffrey, Mike Mann and Steven Kelly. "It 
was a pretty fun trip, and then we all roomed 
together [at the Holiday Inn Portland Air- 
port Hotel, adjacent to the show]." 

Stover says, "I think awards are impor- 
tant to the makers. These guys pour their 
hearts and souls into the knives. You get 



20 / BLADE 



blademag.com 



FEBRUARY 2006 




Worden, who designed the Wort 



for TOPS. The presence of mor 



than in previous years create^ 
Tfor knifemakers and factory repnesenuffift 
to talk knives and possible collaborations 



'WMiSmmm 








an artist like Steve Rapp, and he's sweating 
over the knives." 

Rapp took home the Best Art Knife and 
Best In Show awards at the show for his 
Gold Quartz California Bowie. It showcases 
a 6-inch ATS-34 blade, an 18k-gold guard, 
and an 1 8k-gold and gold-quartz handle in a 
mosaic design. The sheath is engraved and 
gold inlaid by Julie Warenski. The maker's 
list price: $12,500. For a picture of another 
of Rapp's knives, which also won a BLADE- 
handmade Award, see the related story on 
page 1 1 6. A knife by Thad Buchanan, winner 
of the Best Utility Hunter award at BLADE 
Show West, is also featured in that story. 

Buoyed by a Bowie 

Knifemaker David Lang, who has been fash- 
ioning knives on a part-time basis for about 
41/2 years, won the Best New Maker Award. 



The knife he entered in the competition 
is a reproduction of a Sheffield horsehead 
bowie, including a 10-inch 440C blade, a 
desert-ironwood handle, and a sterling-sil- 
ver pommel and guard that were cast and 
sculpted by Mark Degrafenreid. The mak- 
er's list price: $1,050. 

"I probably won the award because of 
the kind of knife it is," Lang proposes. "It's 
straightforward and clean. I did a good job 
on the blade grind [a flat grind]. Considering 
the leather-bound sheath with silver fittings, 
it's a complicated piece for a new maker. I 
learned a lot about how to make those sheaths 
from watching Steve Rapp make his. 

"I've been to a lot of knife shows, but 
BLADE Show West was my first major 
show as an exhibitor," Lang continues. "I'm 
going to do it again. It was worth it, as far as 
meeting the right people who seem willing 



Jon Christensen's "Leaf Bowie" earned 
him the Best Fighter award. The bowie 
showcases an 8 3/8-inch, leaf-pattern, 
mosaic-damascus blade, a wrought-iron 
guard, a hand-rubbed and oil-finished 
walnut handle and a cowhide 
sheath. (BladeGallery.com 
[knife] photo) 





with SpeedSafe' 



RAINBOW CHIVE 

Model 1600VIB 
1 $77.95 

Steel .420HC stainless-steel 

titanium-oxide 

coated 
Handle...410 stainless-steel , 

titanium-oxide 

coated 
Blade.....l 15/16 in. 

(4.9 cm) 
Closed...2 7/8 in. 

(7.3 ci 
Weight...l.9 oz. 
Includes gift tin 







\ 



Blade Magazine 
verall Knife of 
the Year 



RAINBOW LEEK 

Model 1660VIB 

MSRP $99.95 

Steel .440A stainless-steel 

titanium-oxide coated 

Handle...410 stainless-steel 
titanium-oxide coated 

Blade 3 in. (7.5 cm) 

Closed...4 in. (10.3 cm) 
I Weight...3.1 oz. 

Includes soft zipper case 



• 




Patented 

Assisted-OpeninCf 

System 



kerslxaxv 

K N I vm E s 



For information or a dealer near you, call: 1-800-325-2891 
www.kershawknives.com 

Kershaw Ken Onion knives are covered by US Patent Numbers: 
5.802.722 • 6,145,202 • 6,338,431 ■ 6.397,476 



FEBRUARY 2006 



blademag.com 



BLADE / 21 



show pieces 

to help me in my knifemaking, and I learned 
where I need to improve on my knives." 

To Lang, it wasn't the prestige of winning 
the award that thrilled him, but the boost to 
his confidence in knifemaking. "There were 
a lot of nice knives there, and it would have 
been hard for me to judge them. It's a nice 
confirmation that maybe I'm making some 
headway in knifemaking." 

For those, like Lang, with a desire to 
learn more about knifemaking, collecting, 
purveying or manufacturing, seminars were 
held in conjunction with BLADE Show 
West. Saturday's slate included "Knifemak- 
er Freedom & Knife Design," by Ed Fowler; 
"How To Forge A Tomahawk" by Ray Rich- 
ards; "The Subtleties Of Swords" by Vince 
Evans; and "All About The Kershaw MIM 
Process" by Jeff Goddard. 

Sunday's featured seminars were "How 
To Sharpen A Knife" by Wayne Goddard; 
"How To Make A Pistol Knife" by Bruce 
Bump; "How To Make Mosaic Damascus" 
by Gary House; and "Knife And Sheath: The 
Total Package" by Ed Caffrey. 

"Seminars are a great idea. The more 
that can be done during the course of a show 
to get people hooked on knives, you can't 
go wrong," Stover says. "A guy can buy a 
knife on the Internet, but if he experiences 
something at a show, it's incentive to attend. 
He might walk away from the show and tell 
a friend, 'You have to go there next year. 
There was this guy hammering away on steel 
at a forge. It was neat.'" 

"There are still collectors who have to 
feel and hold knives before they buy them," 
Basch interjects. "It's the single biggest rea- 
son why knife shows remain popular." 

Speaking of popularity, Basch says tacti- 
cal and assisted-opening folders remain hot 
commodities in the knife industry, and that 
damascus blades are more popular now than 



One of the many highlights of 
BLADE Show West was a visit from 
BLADE Magazine Cutlery Hall-Of- 
Famer® Pete Gerber, former presi- 
dent of Gerber Legendary Blades. At 
the Gerber booth, he autographed 
Gerber Ultralight L.S.T.s and trading 
cards, the latter in his own image, 
giving them away to show attendees. 




o -Pete' & 



they were three or four years ago. "[Non-da- 
mascus] forged blades are also going through 
their heyday," he remarks. "A knife sells as 
long as it is nicely handcrafted." 

"I'm seeing a throwback to inter- 
frames — the ivory- or pearl-inlaid Busfield 
or Steve Hoel folders, whether engraved or 
not," Stover suggests. "Knives by masters, 
like W.D. Pease or Harvey McBurnette, are 
resurging in popularity. Big fighters and 
bowies are also popular." 




There was some swagger in Ford Swauger's step 
after he won the Best Folder award. The innovative 
double-action folder features a dial underneath the 
front bolster that, when turned one way, allows the 
blade to be opened automatically, and when 
turned the other way, unlocks the open 
blade. The piece sports a 4 1/2- 
inch damascus blade, damascus 
bolsters, a giraffe-bone 
handle and titanium liners. 
(BladeGallery.com 
[knife] photo) 



Knife Cycles 

The knife business, Stover notes, is cycli- 
cal. He and Basch both admit that they never 
thought tactical folders would remain as 
popular as they have, and for such a long 
period of time, and neither purveyor deals 
in tacticals. "Across the board, I've had the 
best business this last year than I have in the 
previous 10-12 years," Stover says. "Any- 
thing from high-end pocketknives, to bowies 
to Loveless knives is selling." 

That's good news for shows like BLADE 
Show West. "I will attend the show again," 
Basch says. "I see some potential there. You 
have a good place for next year — you had a 
good crowd there and they were buying." 

"Being the first time BLADE Show 
West was held in that area, I was impressed," 
Christensen says. "With the quality of mak- 
ers in the Northwest, it begged for a show 
like that. It will be a regular show for me." 

The 2006 BLADE Show West will be held 
Sept. 15-1 7, 2006, at the Portland Airport 
Holiday Inn & Conference Center. For more 
information on the show, contact BLADE 
Show West, attn: M. Lutz, 700 E. State St., 
Iola, WI 54990-0001 877.746.9757, fax 
715.445.4087 mary. lutz@fwpubs. com, 
www. collect, com/shows. 

For the addresses of the knifemakers men- 
tioned in this story, see "Where To Get Em " 
on page 95. 



22 / BLADE 



blademag.com 



FEBRUARY 2006 




TACTICAL KNIVES 



( t A dramatically styled 
frame-lock folder with an 
aggressive hawkbill blade 




s hawkbill blade is 
round from S30V 
tainless and Diamond 
lack DLC coated for 
rear resistance and a 
>w profile 



BLADE LENGTH: 3.000" 
OVERALL LENGTH: 7.40 



THE CARACARA 



t Comes complete with 
two titanium pocket 
clips for tip-up or 
tip-down carry 



of grip styles 




( t CNC-machined solid titanium handles come with a choice of finishes and handle inlays. A coarse bead blast 
complements textured G-10 inserts, while a finer bead blast highlights polished carbon fiber inserts. jSfcVi; 

. \.\. FOR PROFESSIONALS BY PROFESSIONALS- VV 



\"i :• '■ .Tt. :'■ 



\ \ \ \ 

\ '' * Extremely sturdy full-tang 
construction for maximum 
strength and reliability 



\ ' SiS ■ 

de spine options: 



flat, sharpened back edge, or\ 



■ \ \ ! 

, \ i * Blades with sharpened or serrated 
\ \\ \ backiedges feature a unique rein- 
i \\ i forced tip that offers extreme 
point strength and a secondary 
cutting edge not available with 
\ ' i traditional false-edge designs 

\ . fiH 

( t Glass-filled nylon handle slabs 
provide exceptional ergonomics 
and, 'combined with textured 



combined with textured 
iwalk inserts, offer a comfort- 




* Comes equit 



^\\v 



.\v 



v\\«\w 



* Comes equipped with a STRIKE-compa^ible multi-po 
nylon sheath with a molded thermoplastic protective insert 

\ \ \\ \ \ Y'A 

<■* Designed by noted custom knife maker an ' 
Allen Elishewitz 



ni|nni/ 4 iiniiii/|i 



S OBO UF> 



BlackHawk® Products Group • 4850 Brookside Co- 



IliWiKilE^fgOHl 



757.436.3101 • fax 888.830.2013 • fax 757.436.3088 



KttKt^mi 




e knife i carry 




"/ am a long- 
time knife buff 
and small-time 
collector, mostly 
of stag-handle 
factory folders and 
small-to-medium 
stag fixed-blade 
hunters. I grew 
up on a farm, so 
I have carried a 
pocketknife for 
well over 50 years. 
I carry a Kershaw 
Double Cross for 
work around the 
farm and cleaning 
small game, a 
Browning Big 
Game for hunting 
deer and antelope, 
and a Puma stag 
lookback in my 
slacks and suit 
pockets." 

— Steve Switzer, 
Orangeville, Illinois 




"/ carry two pocketknives. One is a Frost Little 
Hawkbill. The other one is an old bone-handle Case 
canoe that a friend of mine found while plowing a 
garden and gave me. The blades were badly rusted, so 
I made new ones for it. I also make my own hunting 
knives and sheaths." 

— Roger Epling, Mouthcard, Kentucky 



"As a volunteer EMT/firefighter, 
I believe that a sharp knife is 
essential. My favorite knife 
to carry is my Cold Steel 
Voyager. I've carried this 
same knife every day for 12 
years. It's been abused and 
used in all kinds of weather, 
but it doesn't break or rust 
and still looks almost as 
good as when I bought it. As 
a collector, two of my favorite 
knives are my Randall Model 
8 Trout & Bird knife [right] 
and Colt hunting knife with 
gut hook [left]. My name 
is etched in the blade of my 
Randall and I hung my dog tag 
in the lanyard hole. I bought 
the Colt while on vacation at 
Smoky Mountain Knife Works 
in Sevierville, Tennessee." 

— Paula Kohler, Wesley, Arkansas 





Just tell us briefly what knife you carry. 
Add a little history or an interesting 
anecdote. Try to include a sharp 
photograph of you and your knife. We 
will publish your comments in an 
upcoming "The Knife I Carry." Your 
name will then be entered in a drawing 
to win a free, high-quality, name-brand 
pocketknife. The drawing will be held 
May 15. Mail to: BLADE Magazine®, P.O. 
Box 789, Ooltewah, TN 37363-0789, or 
e-mail blademagazine@krause.com. If 
you send your entry by e-mail, please 
include your mailing address in case 
you win the drawing for the pocketknife. 




24 / BLADE 



blademag.com 



FEBRUARY 2006 



Lanyard Hole 



Adjustable Pivot Screw 




Thumb Ramp 



Optimum Utility 
Blade Shape 



h 




Custom details including anodized barrel back-spacers and 
machined thumb treads on the titanium monolock bar. 



KEY POINTS 



FEATURE S30V Blade Steel 
BENEFIT Premium Steel; Toughness, 

Edge Retention, Corrosion 

Resistance 

FEATURE 6AL4V Titanium Handle 
BENEFIT Lightweight, Durable, 

Corrosion Resistant Material 

FEATURE Titanium Monolock; Simple 
BENEFIT Function, Extreme Strength 

FEATURE Large Sleek Carry-Clip 
BENEFIT Rides Low in the Pocket 



TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS 


Blade Material 


S30V Stainless Steel Hardened to 58-60HRC 


Blade Length 


1: 3.60" (9.14cm) II: 2.95" (7.50cm) 


Blade Thickness 


I: 0.120" (3.05mm) II: 0.120" (3.05mm) 


Length Open 


I: 8.25" (20.95cm) II: 6.80" (17.27cm) 


Length Closed 


I: 4.75" (12.07cm) II: 3.87" (9.83cm) 


Weight 


I: 4.10oz(116.23gm) II: 3.00oz (85.05gm) 


Handle Material 


Bead Blast 6AL 4V-Titanium Scales; Blue Anodized Aluminum 
Barrel Spacers; Removable Stainless Steel Carry-Clip 


Handle Thickness 


I: 0.420" (1.07cm) II: 0.402" (1.02cm) 


Lock Mechanism 


Monolock 



Blade Style & Opener 
Available Configurations 



Modified Spear-Point; Anodized Aluminum Thumb-Stud 

Both models available in plain edge, stone wash blade 
finish only 




D 

5! 




ALIAS " I & ALIAS 



BRADLEY 



^ 



Currently distributed by Midwest Gun Exchange 800-734-5965 




war 



jf 






r 




7 



)RTHE 



KNIVES 



Wmmm IMiM^) 






South African bushmen are depicted 
hunting giraffe on the mother-of-pearl 
handle of Theuns Prinsloo's locking- 
liner folder. (Alpha photo) 



4 



9 



[/ BLADE 



blademag.com FEBRUARY 2006 




Several of the talents for which Theuns is best known — his special coloring pro- 
cess and stippled liners and backspacers, the latter with carved figures of South 
African bushmen — decorate his Fireworks gent's knife. The blade is colored carbon 
damascus, the bolsters are blued steel with etchings and the handle is mammoth 
ivory. Closed length: 5.75 inches. Custom Knife Gallery's list price: $795. (Custom 
Knife Gallery of Colorado photo) 



When I asked Theuns Prinsloo 
about the "funny little people" 
who "play hide and seek" on 
some of his knives, he said, "They're leg- 
endary South African bushmen known as 
'First People.' I make use of stylized bush- 
man rock art on almost all my knives. Peo- 
ple become aware of the little figures and 
look for them where I sometimes hide them 
on a knife." The resulting folders and fancy 
fixed blades have a distinct character all 
their own. 

From Pretoria to Atlanta and many 
points in-between, Theuns has knife fans in 
both hemispheres. But his success did not 
come overnight; it is a success that traces 
back to a childhood of doing and dreaming. 

"My father was a mechanic, so naturally 
I always did something with my hands — 
building model planes, ships and so on. 
No TV at that time allowed us to live our 
storybook heroes. Tarzan and heroes from 
Afrikaans books like Rooi Jan [Red John] 
and Swart Luiperd [Black Leopard] had us 
making knives, bows and arrows, and the 
like. When I was 9 I cut a scimitar shape 
from a scrap of steel, cut a piece of pipe the 
right length for a handle, then pounded the 
pipe onto the tang to make a sword. 

"My childhood was one big adventure 
in the woods," he continued, "everything 
that had nothing to do with becoming an 
academic achiever. 1 loved sport, especially 
track and gymnastics, and took part in al- 
most everything the school had to offer. Yet, 
I was always drawn to art but never would 
have admitted it or shown an interest be- 



cause I would have been labeled a sissy." 

Though not an academic achiever early 
on, Theuns more than held his own as an 
adult in the world of academia. 

"I became a teacher in physical training 
and languages," he recalled. "I studied at 
night and added [a degree] in psychology to 
help me help kids. I ended up as headmaster 
of a school for kids with learning disabili- 
ties and mild mental retardation." 

After Theuns lost a son in April 1994, 
he took a weekend knifemaking course 
the following September with veteran 
maker Owen Wood and sold his first knife 
in November the same year. He retired as 
headmaster after two years of part-time 
knifemaking. He is in his ninth year of 
full-time knifemaking. 

"I am not the creator of a knife," he said. 
"1 merely reorganize the materials that the 
Creator has given us to take the form of a 
knife. 1 think my inspiration comes from all 
these materials, and a knife should celebrate 
them. A well-done knife requires top me- 
chanics and incorporates good art. I view 
my work as having a 50-50 balance of these 
two qualities. Also, I prefer to use screws 
rather than pins because I need to be able 
to assemble and disassemble the knife many 
times in the making process, and later on 
there might be a need to service the knife." 

Theuns never stops experimenting, 
learning — and improving. 

"When I want to try something new 
and don't know how, I usually find a knife 
book at a show that has information on 
what I want to try. By trial and error I try to 



Green Beret Knife 

Efficient, tough, 
exceptions] 

Words that describe the 
men of the U.S. Army 
Special Forces. 

Words lhal describe 
[he knife designed 
specifically for these 
men - the knife that 
i s p re se n le d t o e v cry j 
graduate from j^ 

Special Forces 
Qualification 
Course - the 
Ya thorough. 

Identical except 
for the markings. 
The Green Beret 
Knife is a 
no-nonsense, 
hardworking 
tool, designed 
byBillHarsey 
and made to 
the leg end a A' 
standards of 
quality by 
Chris Reeve 
Knives 



7 inch blade. 

CTM S30V 

coated with 

KG Gunkote® 

grey canvas micarta handles. 

Ready for a lifetime of 
service. 

Visit our web 

site for a 

complete 

listing of our 

fine one-piece and folding 

blade models. 



www.ch nsreeve.com 



•KNIVES' 



Chris Reeve knives 
1 1624 U. President Be, tfli 

Boise. Idaho 83713 
208-375-11367 



FEBRUARY 2006 



blademag.com 



BLADE / 27 




MOTENG HAS THE BEST SELECTION 

OF IQTR COLLECTIBLES 

AT NEW LOWER PRICES 

UCI397ABNB 

Battle Axe of Gimli™ 

Includes wood Plaque 

forged tool steel and solid wood 

HANDLE 





UCI424 

Museum CollectionSting 
Limited to ;ooo Pieces 
Includes Hardwood Display 




UCI3 84LTLB 

Gimlis Helmet 
Limited to 5000 pieces 
Includes Wood QisplayStand 
Certificate Of Authenticity 

Ask Your Sales Rep About 
Other New [OTRCollectibles 

New Dealers Please Mention 

BL0206 
FOrOurNew Dealer Incentive 

^-0^. Dealers Only Please 

12220 Parkway Centre Drive 
Poway California 92064 

PH: 800-367-5900 or 858-7I5-2500 
fAX: 800.367.5903 or 858-7I5-2525 

> EMAIL: INFO@MOTENG.COM 
WWW.MOTENG.COM 




reinvent the wheel," he stressed. "If I'm not 
successful, after creating a few throwing 
knives — the ones you throw at the wall, 
on the roof or just away — I will ask fellow 
knifemakers, and they mostly give me the 
correct information. This keeps me will- 
ing to share [my knifemaking knowledge] 
with anyone who asks." 

What makes Theuns's knives sell so 
fast? "Is it their smooth action, my choice 
of materials and filework? Or is it because 
people become part of my 'knife family' 
when they buy a knife from me?" he waxed 
rhetorical. "I will happily make a knife for 
anybody." Partly as a result, he said he is 
backordered for several months. 

When he adds more embellishment to 
his knives — inlaid opals, Africana rock 
artwork, sculpted heads of eagles, and da- 
mascus of his own make — and even though 
it requires more time and, consequently, 
higher selling prices, they move out like a 
herd of stampeding elephants. His best sell- 
ing range is $650-$850, with some of his 



©[bLKo)g](o] 



knives going for up to $1,500. 

"Theuns's knives are in a class of their 
own," purveyor Bob Glassman noted. "One 
of the unique features is the way he colors 
the steel. It's a gradient mixture of various 
colors. It's a knockout! He also does a stip- 
pling treatment on bolsters and back spines, 
and colors them beautifully." 

A restraint on South African knifemak- 
ers is the lack of materials and affordable, 
sophisticated knifemaking equipment. 
"Finding new ideas isn't the problem. Find- 
ing a way to bring them into being with 
limited tools and materials is the problem," 
Theuns observed. "I have more new ideas 
in my head than physical proof that I do 
have them." 

However, one of his fellow South Afri- 
can knifemakers, Bertie Rietveld, came to 
the rescue by building two belt grinders, 
two disc sanders, and a mini-belt sander 
for him — all of which operate beautifully. 
Theuns does his own heat treating and has 
built a forge and treadle hammer. A local 



Theuns made the damascus for his 
173/4-inch dagger. The handle is lapis 
lazuli and ebony. The guard and eagle- 
head pommel are electroplated 303 
stainless steel. (Point Seven photo) 




28 / BLADE 



blademag.com FEBRUARY 2006 





Stunning filework highlights two folders by Theuns. (Alpha photo) 



engineer built a 30-ton press for him. 

Like most knifemakers, Theuns has his 
share of shop horror stories. 

"One day I moved my belt grinder from 
its usual place. Since I use [12-volt] light- 
ing at the machines and keep a battery on 
a trickle transformer, when I ground some 
titanium the battery on the table next to me 
exploded with one mighty bang\ Hydrogen 
gas and titanium sparks do not go togeth- 
er!" he stressed. "And I have had a few da- 
mascus billets go haywire on me, and that 
always leaves me annoyed with the time 
and material lost. On the bright side I say, 
'Thanks. A customer did not end up with a 
bad piece of steel.'" 

Theuns aspires to produce each knife 
better than the last in both mechanical 
exactness and applied art. Winning best 
art knife at a South African Knifemak- 
ers Guild Show thrilled him. The win- 
ning knife sported his damascus with a 



Theuns Prinsloo 

Dept. BL2, POB 2263 

Bethlehem, South Africa 

09700 

27 58 303 7111 

t lieu limes (Vrtelkomsa.net 



Specialties Folders and fancy fixed 
blades, including art knives and 
others 

Blade Steels Mosaic and twisted- 
ladder-pattern damascus, and Dam- 
asteel damascus 

Handle Materials Mammoth ivory, 
black-lip mother-of-pearl, snakewood, 
ebony, wart-hog tusk and more 
Embellishment Inlaid opals, Afri- 
cana rock artwork, sculpted eagle 
heads, stippling treatment on bol- 
sters and back spines, hot bluing, an- 
odizing, filework, a special coloring 
process, back spacers carved with 
images of South African bushmen, 
gold-and-silver inlay, and more 
List Price Range $650-$l,500 



carved ivory handle. 

Theuns's Dutch forefathers arrived in 
South Africa in 1648. "I am a white South 
African with a fierce loyalty and love for 
Africa with all its problems," he said. "I'm 
from the old school — morals and eth- 
ics will always rank very high with me." 
Thirty-three years of married life have no 
doubt helped in that regard. "My son and 
daughter have come back to live and work 
with us," be beamed. "My son, Stiaan, is 
also a full-time knifemaker and we share 
the workshop." 

Theuns said he would like to spend 
time working with ABS master smith and 
BLADE* field editor Ed Fowler. Mean- 
while, he just started doing gold-and-sil- 
ver-inlay work and "would like to give en- 
graving a go, as well as trying my hand at 
scrimshaw." 

A healthy respect for nature and all its 
products is a hallmark of Theuns's approach 
to knifemaking. 

"A knife should celebrate all the materi- 
als it's made of. We tend to think that when 
we use mammoth ivory, it might be the old- 
est material we work with but forget that 
titanium was there since Creation. 

"Recently, I came up with an exciting 
new concept: the idea of presenting any tro- 
phy hunter in South Africa with a knife that 
has something of the trophy animal incor- 
porated in making the knife, like bone, hair 
or skin. It should commemorate the hunt 
and honor the animal in some way, as well 
as being a one-of-a-kind collector's item." 
He added that the knife would also include 
a likeness of the trophy animal and/or the 
animal and the hunter. He is exploring other 
options as well. 

Theuns lives life to the fullest. He wind- 
surfs, scuba dives, hunts and fishes, rides his 
own horses and hikes in the bush, where he 
whispers to little bushmen how he is mak- 
ing them known the world over by sending 
them on far-flung missions, using his knives 
as the vehicles. 



iSpeatf Swum sABMie si gg$ 'yaq 
moA uo 10 layood mo A ui samaiy^ 





i 






EM ^ — • 



U> -T1 ~ 






; o a s 3 



— . tn 



aio i? to aS-a 




Extraordinary Tools & Blades 
www.sogknives.com | 888-SOG-BEST 



FEBRUARY 2006 



blademag.com 



BLADE / 29 




Taking 
Tradition! 



\ 



/ 



The Magnum MAG2005 from Boker is substan- 
tial at 11 5/8 inches long with a 7-inch blade of 
440A stainless steel. The handle is a cord wrap 
over a rayskin-like material. Each knife is serial 
numbered and comes in a leather sheath and a 
presentation box. MSRP: $135. 








M33 




Factory companies are offering 
knives with a time-honored Japanese 
look in ever-increasing numbers 



By Mike Haskew 





blademag.ci 






The dual appeal of elegance and 
utility are perennial hallmarks of 
Japanese-style cutlery, and major 
knife manufacturers continue to provide 
consumers with choices that are true to 
such standards. Paying homage to both 
old and new, factory knife companies are 
offering Japanese-style knives in ever- 
increasing numbers. 

A case in point is the Spyderco Kumo. 
Designed by knifemaker R.J. Martin, it 
is fashioned from a 9-inch piece of VG- 
10 stainless steel and incorporates two 
different grinds: a swedge grind along 
the spine and a hollow grind running the 
length of the non-serrated cutting edge. 
The Kumo has a 4 1/8-inch blade and an 



Designed by knifemaker R.J. 
Martin, the Spyderco Kumo 
is constructed from a 9-inch 
piece of VG-10 stainless 
steel and incorporates two 
different grinds: a swedge 
grind along the spine and a 
hollow grind running the 
length of the non-ser- 
rated cutting edge. The 
handle is wrapped in 
the Japanese style 
with epoxy-saturat- 
ed cord covering 
black stingray 
skin and a silver 
Spyderco spider 
menuki (handle 
ornament). 
t MSRP:$130. 





overall length of 8 3/8 inches. The handle 
is wrapped in the Japanese style with ep- 
oxy-saturated cord covering black same 
(also same-gawa), or stingray skin, and 
a silver Spyderco spider menuki (handle 
ornament). 

"R.J. was trying to create a synthesis 
between modern and dynamic grind lines 
and a traditional Japanese look," com- 
mented Sal Glesser, Spyderco president. 
"When we started working on the model, 
he made it known that he preferred natu- 
ral stingray skin for the handle and that 
he wanted the traditional Japanese handle 
wrap. He showed us how to do the wrap. 
We never would have thought wrapping a 
handle had as much to it." 



The Kumo, which is Japanese for spi- 
der, incorporates a series of notches in the 
handle that allow for the thumb to settle 
comfortably into a well-controlled grip. 
A fitted sheath of black Kydex® employs 
the Blade-Tech Tek-Lok detachable clip, 
which can be configured for five differ- 
ent carrying options. At only 3 ounces, 
the Kumo is an ideal carry weight. 

"Our first production run arrived just 
recently, and they're selling well," Gless- 
er said, "but the test is really in how well 
they sell after the initial introduction 
run. The Kumo garnered a lot of atten- 
tion prior to its release. The public seems 
interested and ready for traditional Japa- 
nese designs, and R.J. Martin has such 




FEBRUARY 2006 



blademag.com 



BLADE / 31 



trend 



ing 



an outstanding reputation in the knife 
world." 

An example of the Japanese style at 
an affordable price is the new Bench- 
made Juju, a Mike Snody design. The 
9.4-inch fixed blade sports a colorful 
cord-wrapped handle sandwiched by a 
4.75-inch blade of 440C stainless and a 
steel butt that culminates in an angular 
point. The blade is a modified tanto with 
a chisel grind. The butt includes a couple 
of holes for a lanyard. 



"We never would 

have thought 

wrapping a 

handle had as 

much to it." 

— Sal Glesser 



Beneath the handle's cord wrap is 
red rayskin and a pewter bone-and-skull 
menuki. The contrast between the black 




n affordable price is the new Bench- 



made uujum Mike SnodypesignMh 
9.4-l ncHWxed blade s'p orts a c olorful I 
c*ord-wrapped handle* §5ff&w ic fi&&fily]& 
f^5-iiiSh1b1Stle of 440C stainless and a 



fee/ butt that culminates in an angular 







+ 



The Original Italian American 
Proudly Made in the USA 



Superior Spring Action 
www.protechknives.com 



FROM DUTY ON THE FRONT LINES . . . 



^ USMC 

O 9 Operation Iraqi Freedom 




Godfather , Model 921 - USMC ($280) 



@ 




Godson, , Model 752 ($290) 




Pro-Tech Knives, LLC 

Santa Fe Springs, California 

(562)903-0678 



32 / BLADE 



Godson, , Ultimate Custom ($2,500) 

TO THE FRONT ROW OF YOUR COLLECTION 

blademag.com FEBRUARY 2006 



cord wrap and red rayskin is striking. 
A handsome molded sheath is included. 
MSRP: $80. 

Kissagi-moroha 

Boker designer Dietmar Pohl has devel- 
oped the MAG2005 for the company's 
Magnum division. Patterned after a 
traditional Japanese sword style called 
kogarasu-maru, the MAG2005 sports a 
sweeping blade called kissagi-moroha. 

"The MAG2005 is brand new," re- 
marked Chuck Hoffman, president of 
Boker USA. "Each year we do a special 

The Tsunami Tanto from CAS/Hanwei 
is 11 3/4 inches long with a 6 3/4-inch 
blade of T10 high carbon steel that is 
differentially tempered using a tradi- 
tional clay method. The handle is ribbed 
buffalo horn. MSRP: $350. 







with SpeedSafe® 

Patented Assisted-Opening System 



Knife maker's Hall of Fame member, Frank 
Centofante, joins Ken Onion and Kershaw to 
bring you two new folding knives that provide 
both elegance and function- 
plus the leading 
technology 
you 



expect from Kershaw. The new Models 1610 
and 1615 (with genuine pearl inlay) combine 
Centofante style, including lightweight 
aluminum scales and 410 stainless-steel, 
with Kershaw's Ken Onion SpeedSafe 
assisted opening 



Steel .440A stainless-steel 

BABY BOA w '" 1 ^ p '' 5 ' 1 ''"' s ' 1 

Handle...6061-T6 anodized aluminum 
Model 1585BR wFtfl smoked finish 

MSRP $74.95 Blade 2 in. (5.1 cm) 

Closed...2 3/4 in. (7.0 cm) 
Weight. J.7 oz. 




Steel .440A stainless-steel 

Handle...606H6 anodized aluminum 

CENT0FANTE-0NI0N Blade i Win. (5.7 cm) 

Model 1610 Closed.,.3 1/8 in. (7.9 cm) 
t Weight 1.6 oz. 

MW 569.95 includes pocket clip 




technology, 

The results are knives that handle the tough 

tasks and look good doing it. 

Also new in 2005 are Ken Onion's Baby Boa 
and Mini Mojo. The Baby Boa mirrors the lines 
of the larger Boa but offers something special 
of its own. 



CENT0FANTE-0NI0N 



Steel .440A stainless-steel 



Model 1615 Handle...410 polished stainless-steel with 
iicdd foooc Tungsten DLC coating & Pearl inlays 

MW599.9S Bye 2 1/4 in. (5.7 cm) 

Closed.,.3 1/8 in. (7.9 cm) 

Weight...2.4oz. 

Includes leather sheath with clip 




A unigue 

cutaway in the handle exposes 

the SpeedSafe torsion bar to give you a 

unigue glimpse at the inner workings of the 

system. The Mini Mojo combines SpeedSafe 

with our newly patented Stud Lock. Stud 

fock offers super-secure locking, yet is easy 

to release when you're ready to use it. All four 

new knives are superb examples of the Knife 

maker's art and Kershaw's forward-t 

technology. 




stainless-steel 
Handle.,.410 stainless-steel 

with G-10 inserts 

Blade 2 3/8 in. (6.1 cm) 

Closed.,.3 1/2 in. (8.9 cm) 
Weight...3.1 oz. 
Includes NEW patented 



kmhoNT 

K N I V^ E S 



For information or a dealer near you, call • 1-800-325-2891 • www.kershawknives.com 

Kershaw Ken Onion knives are covered by OS Patent Numbers: 5,802,722 • 6,145,202 • 6,338,431 • 6.397.476 



FEBRUARY 2006 



blademag.com 



BLADE / 33 




Prioritize. 

MCusta Knives 

MCusta Knives are true 
masterpieces combining 
traditional Japanese 
elements and craftsmanship 
with modern cutting-edge 
technology. MCusta knives 
feature VG-10 and Nickel 
Damascus with VG-10 core 
Blades, exotic handle 
materials and high precision 
mechanisms. Each MCusta 
knife is hand assembled and 
hand finished by an 
experienced craftsman 
producing a superior knife. 
MCusta stands for Machine 
Custom Knives! 




Dealer Contact Infori 

• Kencrest USA, Inc. San Diego, CA 
& Seki, Japan 
Phone: 858-663-3985 
E-mail: infoffi>kencrest.us 



www.JapaneseKnifeWholesale.com 

• Blue Ridge Knives 
onestop@bluerideeknives.com 
www.bluerideeknives.com 



• Moteng, Inc. 
infoffim0ten2.com www.motene.com 



***** Shop Online ***** 

www.JapaneseKnifeDirect.com 



^iM.^© 1 




The CRKT First Strike comes in small, medium and large sizes in an 
MSRP range of $54.99-$89.99. Each is available in a black cord- 
wrapped handle and a satin-finished blade of 44QA stainless steel, 
the shape of which is a combination of the ancient chokuto straight 
sword and the classic mohora-zukuri double-edged tanto. 



knife in the Magnum line, and we make 
only 1,999 pieces. People [familiar with 
our knives] know we do this and it has 
been going on for probably 10 years or 
so. We sell out each year and the 1,999 
pieces are sold worldwide — not just in 
the United States." 

The MAG2005 is substantial at 11 
5/8 inches long with a 7-inch blade of 
440A stainless steel. The handle is a cord 
wrap over a rayskin-like material. Each 
knife is serial numbered and comes in 
a leather sheath and a presentation box. 
MSRP: $135. 



"The way we describe the blade is 
as a modified dagger," Hoffman added. 
"It was designed by a gentleman named 
Amanuki and based on a historical Japa- 
nese samurai sword that was popular 
during the Heian Period [circa 795-1185 
A.D.]. The blade is double edged and 
sharpened on the top two-thirds of the 
way from the tip toward the guard. It has 
a non-serrated edge and a blood groove, 
which is neat because the whole shape of 
the blade swings up a bit and it's not a 
straight groove." 



34 / BLADE 



blademag.com 



FEBRUARY 2006 



The SwOrd AviitOVV www.swordarmory.com • 888-783-7802 

The New 2005 Last Legend Competition Katun us 



Last Legend 

Competition Bktctes 



cJfie heads of the 
cFfve ^FamiYies 




Five new design families with six models in each family. Blades designed for Goza competition, blades designed for 
fresh bamboo cutting, models with 1/2 inch sori, models with 1 full inch of sori, and, as always, the customer's 
choice of two standard blade lengths with or without bohi - All ai NO extra charge. That gives the customer a choice 
of 120 standard "No Extra Charge" configurations; and with the extra cost options, the customer can now create any 
of 372,960 different configurations, colors, lengths, etc. - for the real martial artist, it's a dream come true. 

Their 2003 editions made Last Legend number one in giving the martial artist a choice with their production blade. 
With their 2005 editions they have even outdone themselves. 30 New models, priced from $297.00 to $929.00. 

Call Sword Armory toll free 888-783-7802 to find out why thousands of real customers consider Last Legend 
the best "production" cutting blades in the world. It's the balance, the design, and unsurpassed customer service. 




If you missed Last Legend's 2nd annual customer 
appreciation weekend, you missed a lot. Held on the 
grounds of the Last Legend facilities, it was Fun in the 
Sun with Swords 2005©. This event was two and a half 
days of Free food, Free cutting, Free instruction by 
Senseis from around the world, a hands-on with all the 
latest Last Legend products, T-Shirts, and cutting 
competitions with cash awards and trophies presented. 
As one guest put it "I have to rate this as among the top 
ten most fun times 1 have ever had!". It's Last Legend's 
way of thanking their customers, a novel concept. 
Don't miss Fun in the Sun with Swords 2006© 
No one puts customers first, like Last Legend. 

Last Legend products are available at authorized retailers throughout North America, Europe, Asia, and Australia. 





trend 



racking 



Ever since our foundation in 1907, we havia 
jeen producing high quality knives with 

original design and high precision. 

Backed by our proud history of almost 
K) years, every one of our handmade 
knife is made for unmatched 
"Sharpness and durability". 



^MOKI 




Distribution in USA. 

Blue Ridge Knives. 

E-mail:onestop@blueridge knives, com 
TEL: (276) 783-6 143. FAX:(276)783-9298 



MOKI KNIFE COMPANY LTD. 

Web Site:http://www.moki. co.jp 

PO BOX25,Scki City.Gifu Prcf.JAPAN.jOl-3224 



Tsunami Tanto 

In 2004, CAS/Hanwei began producing 
the Hanwei SH5022 Tsunami Tanto as 
part of a Japanese-style set that includes 
katana and wakizashi swords. Available 
separately, the Tsunami Tanto is 11 3/4 
inches long with a 6 3/4-inch blade of T- 
10 high carbon steel that is differentially 
tempered using a traditional clay method. 
The handle is ribbed buffalo horn, while 
the hilts of the katana and wakizashi are 
covered in rayskin and wrapped with wo- 
ven Japanese black cotton. 

"The ribbed-buffalo-horn handle is 
something that we haven't done before," 
noted CAS/Hanwei's Patrick Shipley. 
"It's in a style that you would see, but 
not very often. This one is hard to keep 
on the shelf because of its unique handle 
and the fact that the differentially tem- 
pered blade has a real hamon [temper 
line], which is very apparent." 



"The ribbed-buf- 
falo-horn handle 

is something 
that we haven't 

done before." 
— Patrick Shipley 



All the furniture on the Tsunami 
Tanto and the other pieces in the set bear 
the tsunami motif. The style is based on 
a tanto of the Japanese Edo Period (circa 
1605-1870 A.D.). According to Shipley, 
functional Japanese-style weapons were 
difficult to come by until about 10 years 
ago unless a buyer went the handmade 
route. However, during the past five or 
six years, CAS/Hanwei's production has 
advanced rapidly from one piece to nine 
different katana sets. 

"The Tsunami Tanto sells individual- 
ly for about $350, and all of these pieces 
can be bought separately or as a set with 
two other matching pieces," Shipley ob- 
served. 

First Strike 

The Columbia River Knife & Tool First 
Strike series reportedly is popular among 
military and law enforcement personnel, 
and comes in small, medium and large 
sizes. Introduced in 2003, its manufac- 
turer's suggested retail prices range from 
$54.99-$89.99. 

"I think there has been a resurgence 
of interest in the Japanese style, and [the 



36 / BLADE 



blademag.com 



FEBRUARY 2006 



First Strike] is the American version of 
the Japanese tanto," commented Doug 
Flagg, CRKT vice president of sales and 
marketing. "We've had a great response 
and people into the martial arts like 
them, as well as do the military people. 

"In the medium size, we came out 
this year with a black blade and an ol- 
ive-drab, cord-wrapped handle, which 
is proving popular with collectors. Un- 
derneath the cord wrap is stingray and it 
gives you just a fantastic grip. One thing 
we're doing different from most manu- 
facturers is a convex edge on the blade, 
which is stronger than the typical edge 
and looks kind of like an appleseed [con- 
vex] cross section." 



"One thing we're 
doing different 

from most manu- 
facturers is a 
convex edge." 
— Doug Flagg 



The small 2706 First Strike is 7 1/8 
inches long, with a 3 1/8-inch blade and 
a weight of 2.9 ounces. The medium ver- 
sion is 9 1/2 inches with a 4 3/8-inch blade 
and weighs 7.2 ounces. The large model is 
11 3/4 inches with a 5 1/2-inch blade and 
weighs 11.2 ounces. Each is available in 
a black cord-wrapped handle and a satin- 
finished blade of 440A stainless steel, the 
shape of which is a combination of the an- 
cient chokuto straight sword and the clas- 
sic mohora-zukuri double-edged tanto. 

"With some knives the sheath is an 
afterthought," Flagg said, "but the Zy- 
tel® sheath system on the First Strike 
series really works well. It's thoroughly 
thought out and can be positioned for 
several different carries. The 440A steel 
is a good, all-around stainless that gets 
very sharp and isn't brittle, so it won't 
snap or break." 

Variety in the Genre 

Given the overall market response to 
Japanese-inspired cutlery, manufactur- 
ers probably will continue to offer a va- 
riety in the genre. The appeal of the style 
crosses boundaries, from collectors to 
everyday users. 

Which are you — or are you both? 

For the contact information for the knives 
in the story, see "Where To Get 'Em " on 
page 95. 



Presenting the Twenty-Second Annual 

gofvang Custom 
^Knife gftcrw 

To Be Held At The ^ jjF 

Royal ^. ^ 4 ^ 



Scandinavian Inn 

400 Alisal Road 

Solvang, California 



For Hotel Reservations Call^P?P 
(805) 688-8000 




Sponsored By 

NORDIC KNIVES 

California's Finest 

Cutlery Store 

1634 Copenhagen Drive 

Solvang, California 93463 

WWW.NORDICKNIVES.COM 



April 28, 29, & 30, 2006 

Show Hours 

Friday 1 2 Pm - 5 Pm 

Saturday 1 Am - 4 Pm 

Sunday 10 Am - 1 Pm 

Admission: 1 - Day - $10, 3-Day Pass - $20 (Sunday - $2) 



^C Speciaf Coffector's "Hour jf- 

Friday 1 1 Am - 1 2 Pm 

With Purchase Of 3 - Day Pass. 

Pre-Recistration Advised. 

Contact Nordic Knives To 

Pre-register For This Showing. 



Setting the Standard for Excellence since 1985 
For Show Information Call Nordic Knives (805) 688-3612 

The Following People Have Reserved Tables For The 2006 Show: 



Bill Ankrom 

Van Barnett 

Charles Bennica (France) 

Bill's Custom Cases 

Gary Blanchard 

Phil Boguszewski 

Frank Centofante 

Joel Chamblin 

Bill Cheatham 

Joe Cordova 

Dellana 

T.M. Dowell 

Kaj Embretsen (Sweden) 

Ernest Emerson 

Jim Ence 

Paul Farina 

H.H. Frank 

Dennis Friedly 

Larry Fuegen 

Shun Fuiikawa (Japan) 

Stanley Fuiisaka 
Tom & Cwen Guinn 



Tim Hancock 

Koji Hara (Japan) 

Phill Hartsfield 

Jay Hendrickson 

Gil Hibben 

Harumi Hirayama (Japan) 

Howard Hitchmough 

Steve Hoel 

D'Alton Holder 

Jess Horn 

Tom Hutton 

Steve Johnson 

Linda Karst-Stone 

Joe Kious 

Randy & Sonja Lee 

Steve Likarich 

Bob Lum 

Simon Lytton (England) 

Jeff Morgan 

Ken McFall 

Thomas McGuane, IV 



Bud Nealy 

Ron Newton 

Jonny Walker Nilsson (Sweden) 

Nordic Knives 

Warren Osborne 

Oso Famoso 

Chris Reeve Knives 

Zaza Revishvili 

Scott Sawby 

Eugene Shadley 

Scott Slobodian 

John W. Smith 

Jim Sornberger 

Rhett Stidham (RKS) 

Leon Thompson 

P.J. Tomes 

Ricardo Velarde 

Julie Warenski 

J. W. Winchester & Co. 

Daniel Winkler & Karen Shook 

Owen Wood 

Yoshindo Yoshihara (Japan) 



FEBRUARY 2006 



blademag.com 



BLADE / 37 




guild directions 




What The Guild Does 
For Its Members 



By Allen Elishewitz 
a Guild board director 



The world's oldest knifemaking organization wants 
you to know what it can do for you 



What does The Knifemakers' 
Guild do for its members? 
Before answering the question, 
let's define what a guild really is. 

According to Webster's dictionary, 
in medieval times a guild was "an 
association of craftsmen or merchants" 
and/or an "association of persons with 
kindred pursuits, interests or aims." The 
Knifemakers' Guild is an organization that 
brings together knifemakers, collectors and 
individuals in related trades, from suppliers 
of materials to publishers and purveyors, to 
name a few. The organization has roughly 



1,500 members who are very diverse but all 
have one thing in common: The passion for 
finely crafted handmade knives. 

The Guild was the first organization 
of its kind when it was started in 1970. 
Afterwards, other individuals saw the 
success of the Guild and created other 
cutlery organizations. The Guild was solely 
responsible for gathering and organizing 
makers throughout the United States. It 
gave them a place to gather — the annual 
business meeting and Guild Show where 
they were able to sell their creations and 
exchange technical information. 




The Guild sponsors various knifemaking 
seminars or cutting schools and a cutting 
competition at its annual show, where the 
author demonstrated the form that enabled 
him to chop the 2x4 in half in a scant 4.8 



seconds at this past summer's show. To the 
immediate left of the author is BLADE® field 
editor Steve Schwarzer, who was in charge of 
event safety and security. Seated at right is 
Larry Harley, competition Judge. 



With the onset of the Guild, the quality 
of handmade knives soared, mainly because 
of the brotherhood and openness of the 
members in sharing their knifemaking 
knowledge. The Guild also established 
and enforced a level of craftsmanship that 
provided the collectors with a guaranteed 
level of quality. Each Guild member has to 
follow a set of rules on business ethics to 
which they are held liable. This gives the 
collectors a recourse and peace of mind. 

Sharp Perks 

So what does the Guild do for its members? 

•The Guild conducts an annual 
knife show whose exhibitors are 
Guild members only. The only 
knives allowed in the room are 
handmade by Guild members. 
Several lectures on various topics 
of interest to the knifemakers and 
collectors are offered during the 
annual show as well; 

•The Guild publishes a newsletter 
three times a year to communicate 
with its members. The newsletter 
features articles on knifemaking 
and related topics, various photos 
and articles on current events such 
as knifemaking or cutting schools, 
achievements by Guild members and 
other relevant news. It is also a tool 
to help promote its members; 

•The Guild also sponsors various 
knifemaking seminars or cutting 
schools organized by Guild members 
for the education of knifemakers and/ 
or collectors. A cutting competition 
is held at the annual Guild Show; 

•The Guild's Honorary members 
and collectors are a very important 
part of the Guild. On the Thursday 
night before the annual Guild Show, 
the past presidents and current 
president of the Guild host a gala in 



38 / BLADE 



blademag.com 



FEBRUARY 2006 



Folder Kits 



DDR-3 Button Lock Kit 
®7 



DDR3BL Base Parts Kit . $ 56.95 

DDR3BL-CF Carbon Fiber sen es .$ 29.95 

DDR3BL-TEAK Teak scales ... $19.95 

DDR3BL-BG Black G-10 scaes $19.95 

DDR3BL-Coco Cocobolo scales . . $ 19.95 

DDR3 Locking Liner Kits 



Fixed Blade Kits 



SG4™ Hunting Series 



Sheath Making Supplies 




DDR3-RR Base Parts Kit Recurve Blade/Curved Bolster ... $46.95 
DDR3-TACS Base Parts Kit Tactical Blade/Straight Bolster $46.95 
DDR3-CF Handle Scales Carbon Fiber scales $29.95 

DDR3-BOLO Handle Scales Cocobolo scaler S19.95 

DDR3-MACA Handle Scales Macawood scales $19.95 

DDR3-CURU Handle Scales Curupay scale $19.95 

The Typhoon™ Precision Balisong Kit 






SG4-DP Hunting Series Drop Point $ 37 95 

SG4-MB Hunting Series Modern Bowie . .. S 37 95 

SG4-TP Hunting Series Trailing Pent $ 37.95 

SG4-STD Hunting Series Standa-c $ 37.95 

SG4-Coco Cocobolo wood scales $14 00 

SG4-Curu Curupay wood scales $ 14 00 

SG4-Maca Maca wood scales ... $ 14 00 

SG4-Teak Teak wood scales $14 00 

CC4 : Cowboy Classic DP™ 



Comes with ground and sharpened blade. 
Includes fasteners, handle spacers, leather 
handle washers, butt, guard and assembly 

hardware $49.95 

CC4-SHECC4 Leather Sheath $ 5.95 







TYPHOON-S Typhoon Standard Hand o Vorsio" S 69.95 

TYPH-DTEMP Skeletonizing Template . 5 14.95 

KKSD-332 3/32 Drill for skeletonizing $ $ 1 .49 

TYPH-SPK Typhoon™ Spare Parts K.: S 12.95 

TYPH-TRB Typhoon™ Training Blade $ 19.95 

GPC-1000™ Locking Liner Folder Kit 



GPC Base Parts Kit 5 44.95 

GPC-CF Carbon Fiber scales .. $29.95 

GPC-BOLO Cocobolo scales . $19.95 

GPC-BG Black G-10 scales $ 19.95 

GPC-BLG Blue G-10 scales $ 19.95 

GX6™ Locking Liner Gent's Pocket Dagger 

GX6 Base Parts Kit $44.95 

GX6-CF Carbon Fiber scales . .. $ 29.95 

GX6-BOLO Cocobolo scales $ 19.95 

GX6-BG Black G-10 scales $ 19.95 

GX6-BLG Blue G-10 Scales $ 19.95 

The American Whittler Slipjoint Kit 

KKAALB All-American Lookback Folder Kit . $ 16.95 

KKAALB-COCO Cocobolo Scale Set $ 12.95 

KKAALB-TEAK Teak Wood Scale Set $ 12.95 

KKAALB-CURU Curupay Wood Scale Set $ 12.95 

KKAALB-MACA Maca Wood Scale Sel $ 12.95 

The All-American Lookback Kit 



KKAALB All-American Lookback Foldf < • $ 1 6.95 

KKAALB-COCO Cocobolo Scale Set 5 12.95 

KKAALB-TEAK Teak Wood Scale Sei $ 12.95 

KKAALB-CURU Curupay Wood Scale Set . . . 3 12.95 

KKAALB-MACA Maca Wood Scale Se: S 12.95 

DDR-1 ™ Locking Liner Folder Kit 



The Delta 5 series includes 4 distinct tactical blade styles. Picture! 
above is the D5 chute grind And shown in stag, a modified 05 
spear point. Please see web site or catalog for more. 
D5BL-MB Delta 5™ Modern Bowie Parts Kit $37 95 

D5BL-Ck Delta 5™ Chute Knife ^arts Kit $37.95 

D5BL-DP Delta 5™ Drop Point Pdrtb «■: S 3/95 

D5BL-SP Delta 5"" Spear Point ->,;ts K.| S 37.95 

D5-COCO Cocobolo wood scales $12.00 

D5-CURU Curupay wood scales $ 1? 00 

D5-BCM Black Canvas Micarta scales S 12.00 

D5-BLM Black Linen Micarta sea es ... .5 12 00 



Equipment & Tools 



KYSHE06-12 .60 Black Kydex 12x12 $ 4.10/ft 

KYSHE08-12 .80 Black Kydex 12x12 $ 4.95/ft 

KYSHDC06-12 .60 Desert Camo Kydex 12x12 $ 8.49/ft 

KYSHDC08-12 .93 Desert Camo Kydex 12x12 $ 8.99/ft 

KYSHFC06-12 .60 Forest Camo Kydex 12x12 $ 8.49/ft 

KYSHFCQ8-12 93 Forest Camo Kydex 12x12 $ 8.99/ft 

CXCF-126 Carbon Fiber Concealex (06) 12x12 $ 8.49/ft 

CXCF-1293 Carbon Fiber Concealex (.093) 12x12 $ 8.99/ft 

Kydex/Concealex Sheath Making Parts 

i .,' m 

KKSMF12 Sheath Making Foam (12x12x- 1 $ 8.95/ea 

TEKS1 Small Tek-Lok (hrdw incl) $ 7.95/ea 

TEKL1 Large Tek-Lok - (hrdw incl) $ 7.95/ea 

IWB1 Inside Waist Band Loop $ 3.95/ea 

KKCS-10 Chicago Screws (7/16" head) Coated Black ...$ 4.45/10 

KYSR6-100 6-6(3/16) black rivets For. 06 Kydex $10 00/100 

KYSR69-100 6 - 9 (3/16) black rivets for .08/.09 Kydex $ 12.00/100 
KYSR8-100 8-8 (1/4) black rivets for .06/08 Kydex .$12.00/100 
KYSR9-100 8-9(1/4) black rivets for .09 Kydex $14.00/100 






s (12" x 8") Bench Model 



The Kalamazoo 1-SN 1 x 42 inch grinder is the perfect choice for 
pro level kit building. It conserves valuable shop space with a 
small bench footprint while performing all the vital tasks of profes- 
sional knife finishing necessary for clean knife making results. For 
high level finishing work or all-around kit construction tasks, this is 
the perfect choice! 

Combined with our HGA-01 (Horizontal Finish Attachment) and 
the SPA-01 (Horizontal/Vertical Swingplate Assembly), this kit 
building grinder/finishing system will generate the best results "for 



Ihe 



ieiv."! 



1-SMKG-PRO Knifek 

Includes: 

(1) 1SM Kalamazoo Grinder, OoW 

(1) HGA-01 Horizontal Finishing Attachment 

(1) SPA-01 Horizontal/Vertical Swing Plate Assembly. 



Pro Kit Maker's Finishing sysem. 





Parts & Accessories 






€T 




/ 



Our professional rivet flaring dies and unique press system will 
a permanent end to split rivets when fastening Kydex together in 
your sheath making process. 

KYRD-6B #6 (3/16) Rivet Flaring Dies $ 29.95/ea. 

KYRD-88 #8 (1/4) Rivet Flaring Dies $ 29.95/ea. 

KYRD-PRO Pro Kit Kydex Rivet Press with #8 (1/4) and #6 (3/16) 
flaring dies. Save $$S S 129.95/ea 



DDR1 Base Parts Kit $39.95 

DDR1-CF Carbon Fiber scales .... S 29.95 

DDR1-BOLO Cocobolo scales . ... 3 19.95 

DDR1-BG Black G-10 scales . .. S 19.95 

DDR1-BLG Blue G-10 scales $ 19.95 

DDR2™ Locking Liner Gents Folder Kit 






Books & Videos 







DDR2 Base Parts Kit $ 36.95 

DDR2-CF Carbon Fiber sen s $ 29.95 

DDR2-BOLO Cocobolo scales $19.95 

DDR2-BG Black G-10 scales . $19.95 

DDR2-BLG Blue G-10 scales . ... .$19.95 



COIL50 .50 coil spring (High Torque) $ 1 .75/ea 

COIL5010 .50 coil spring (High _r o'que) $ 14 95/10 

COILM50 .50 coil spring (MAXX Torqje) NE $ 2 00/ea 

COILM5010 50 coil spring (MAXX Torque) NEW $ 1b 95/10 

COIL1 .48 coil spring S 1 75/ea 

COIL10 .48 coil spring .5 14 95/10 

COIL43 .43 coil spring (High Torque) S 1 75/ea 

COIL4310 .43 coil spring (High "o-que) S 14 95/10 

COILM43 .43 coil spring (MAXX Torque) NEW S ? 00/ea 

COILM4310 .43 coil spring (MAXX Torque) NEW . S "6 95/10 

COIL375 .375 coil spring (High "o-que) S 1 75/ea 

COIL375-10 .375 coil spring (High lorque) S 14 95/10 

COILM375 .375 coil spring (MAXX Torque, NEW S 2.00/ea 

COILM37510 .375 coil spring (MAXX Torque) NEW S 16 95/10 



We have a complete library resource for the knife maker. Visit ou 
web site or see our catalog for current print, video and DVD train- 



Handles Materials 



We carry most handle materials used in knife making. From carbon 
fiber, G-10, Micarta, exotic woods and other natural materials. 
Please see our catalog or web site for details. 




M]LM3ME©GaLimiM 



Knife Industries 



SMS 




\?ZETZ]J]M1Bl^^ 




/V 



Our 12" x 8" kydex/concealex sheath maker's bench-type molding 
press is the best production quality thermoplastic forming press 
on the market today. Built from rugged 1/4" steel plate, this sheath 
forming press will last a lifetime. It was designed by experts, for 



J 





FREE CATALOG 



To receive a free copy of 
our bench catalog, please fill in 
the below form ... 

Name 

Address 

City 

State 

Zip 



MAIL T( CLASSIC KNIFE KITS 

1600 PALMETTO TYRONE ROAD 

SHARPSBURG, GA 30277 

BOS 
Or, e-tna.il the above to info@hiifekits.com 



m o 



to 


a 


ft) 


is 


o 


-< 


■ll 


o 


H 


c 




^ 


ft) 


-n 


•v 


3 


Q> 


ID 


i£> 


O 


Q 




-1 D 


O 


O 


2 


£ 


3 


3 


a 


H 


O 


3" 



KNIFE 

| MART 




s i 

Si 

Sic 

■a u> 
— ^ 

si 

■^ o 

3 

Overall 11" 

Cryogenic 

Heat Treated 

440-C Rc57 

.25'Thfck. 

Micarta Slab 

Handles. 

Kydex Sheath 

$189 
$8 UPS Shipping 
$2Ea Addn'l Knife 
Lower 48 USA 
To: Knife Mart 
596 W.300S. 
Hey burn, ID 
83336 U.S.A. 
800 331 3213 
m 7na K7R 11 57 



gui 



Id directions 

honor of the Honorary members. During the 
evening, each knifemaker attending the show 
has the opportunity to display his/her best 
knife. It provides the Honorary members a 
prelude of things to come during the Guild 
Show weekend. As an added expression of 
gratitude for their support, the Honorary 
members are allowed in the showroom one 
hour before the general public each day of 
the show; 

•Before becoming a full Voting member, 
each maker must serve a probationary period 
of three years, during which the maker's work 
is examined and critiqued by his/her peers, 
and the maker is given technical advice to 
improve his/her work. The Guild has created a 
group of Mentors who are available to answer 
new members' questions and otherwise help 
them. Furthermore, all new members are 
given a membership list so they can contact 
any other Guild knifemakers if they have a 
question about a knifemaking process. New 
Guild members are often impressed with the 
manifestation of the spirit of brotherhood 
alive in the Guild; 

•Last year the Guild asked for volunteers 
for the new State Leaders program. The 
volunteers are contacts at the state level 
for anyone who wants to become a Guild 
member or needs information about the 
Guild. In addition, the volunteers represent 



the Guild at local events and supervise the 
making of a special knife by several Guild 
members in their state. The knives will be 
raffled off at the 2006 Guild Show. More 
information about this project will appear in 
future installments of "Guild Directions." 

The Guild stands for quality handmade 
knives and promotes that concept through its 
various activities and policies. The members 
who take full advantage of all that the Guild 
has to offer and pursue a higher level of 
craftsmanship, dedication and involvement 
in conjunction with the oldest association of 
knifemakers achieve higher recognition both 
inside and outside the Guild. 

Anyone who is interested in knifemaking 
should be a member of the Guild. By being 
a member, you can give back to the industry. 
You can show your peers and collectors that 
you support a long-standing organization, 
and that you are available for any technical 
help to your fellow knifemakers. 

In addition, any non-knifemaking 
individual interested in fine handmade knives 
and collecting should belong to the Guild 
as an Honorary member. Your Honorary 
membership opens the door to a very special 
world and its perks. 

For more information, contact The 
Knifemakers ' Guild, Dept. BL2, P.O. 
Box 1251, New Port Richey, FL 34656- 
1251, or visit the Guilds website at www. 
knifemakersguild. com. 



JOY ENTERPRISES 

1862 MLK BLVD, RIVIERA BEACH, FL 33404-7105 • Phone: (561) 863-3205 • Fax: (561) 863-3277 
For Quick 5ervice Toll Free: (800) 500-FURY(3879) • e-mail: mail@joyenterprises.com 

e-mail : mail@joyenterprises.com • Catalog available to dealers only. Please include letterhead, phone number & resale license number. 



Pocket Knives 



from musrnnc 




Genuine Rams Horn Handles 

With Sheaths 

Nickel Silver Bolsters 





- 



\ 






10305 - 4" 
Genuine Rams Horn 
Stockman with Soft Pouch 



10304 - 3 3 A" 

Genuine Rams Horn 

2 Blades with Soft Pouch 



40 / BLADE 



blademag.com 



FEBRUARY 2006 




Ever wonder why Last Legend doesn't have to pay people to say nice things about their swords? It's because the 

people who buy Last Legend swords say it. 

Every Last Legend sword that ships out is accompanied by a questionnaire asking many questions about the blades 

and the service they received. It's the answers from people who used their hard earned money to buy the swords that 

say it all, and isn't that what's important. 



Here are a few customer replies to the question, 
What is your overall impression of your Last Legend product and the service you received? 

• Tlicy arc supplying the average person a wonderful glimpse at the world of Japanese swords. Great service. People seem to really 
want to satisfy' 1 the customer fully. Can a $5000 katana "really" be 10 times better? 

Stephen — Superior, CO 

• Very good, the Last Legends line of blades arc unmatched for their cost. 

Sklylar — Berry ton, KS 

■ Excellence-- You may spend more money for a sword, but you will not get a better sword for your money. 

Bart— -Kountze, TX 

• Last Legend is the best production sword company in the world. Maybe even the best sword company in the world. 

William — Thornton. CO 

• Very good, and like I said. 1 am considcrina another order. I am impressed! Worth the wait for special order. 

Billy— -Tomball, TX 

■ Exec Hence— You mav spend more monev for a sword, but you will not get a better sword for your money. 

Bail— -Kountze. TX 

• That finally someone is making quality purpose built swords without having to spend several thousand dollars on a custom sword; and 
also 1 am very impressed with the depth of information o provided about their product. 

Eric — Mcriden, CT 

• Service was excellent and the impression of L.L. was one of a professional company selling a product better than like priced products 
of their competitors; especially since the customer is able to choose between so many options to basically obtain a "custom" sword. 

Gary' — Whit more, CA 

• The service is fantastic. I couldn't wait until the iaito showed up. I wish 1 knew of Last Legend earlier on. I would have never bought 
from someone else. 

Nolan — West Greenwich. Rl 

• Last Legend's attentiveness to workmanship and detail and listening to customers is commendable. My next blade will be a Last 
Legend, 

David — Searcy, AR 

• 1 have around 60 to 70 swords and three or four hundred knives. This sword I purchased from you is one of the best swords I have. 

Frank — Dayton, NV 

• 1 plan on ordering a expensive LL katana, so 1 think that speaks for itself. 

Michael— -Sonoma. CA 

• 1 was very impressed with the quality of the sword. 

Jacqualine — Winter Park. PL 

• 1 am very impressed and plan on sharing more of my business with you. 

Shane — Thornton. CO 



It's the design, the balance, the unsurpassed customer service, and the fact that Last 
Legend actually listens to their customers. 



c sirJaft!3e£ teels 



I 



I 



I 



I 



By Steve Shackleford 

CARBON STEELS WILL NEVER OVERTAKE 

CORROSION-RESISTANT STEELS IN POPULARITY. 

BUT THEY REMAIN A VIABLE, HIGH-PERFORMANCE ALTERNATIVE 









•' 


' ™ 




' 


^H 


















■ 





chopping form that has 
helped him win back- 
to-back world cutting 
championships at the 
BLADE Show. The car- 
bon steel in his knife for 
both titles: 0-1 tool steel. 
(Thomason photo) 






-ag.com 





j 






FEB 


RUAF 


tY 


2006 












In terms of overall performance, carbon 
steels have a lot to offer from a knife 
user's point of view. They are tougher 
and/or more flexible, making them more 
able to chop and less likely to chip, as well 
as easier to sharpen than most corrosion-re- 
sistant (aka stainless) steels. What's more, 
according to some, due in large part to its 
toughness, a blade of carbon steel is a better 
performer than one of corrosion-resistant 
steel when the edge is ground super thin. 

From the knifemaker's point of view, 
carbon steels would seem preferable to 
corrosion-resistant steels in several areas. 
For instance, carbon steels are less expen- 
sive, easier to grind and heat treat, and, in 
many cases, more readily available. 

A Knife That Rusts? 

So who wants "a knife that rusts" — 
which carbon steels are more prone to do 
than corrosion-resistant steels? Plenty of 
people, that's who. For one thing, with 



regular care and maintenance, carbon 
steels can be kept relatively rust free. "If 
I spend a hundred bucks for a knife, after 

1 use it, I clean it just like I clean my pis- 
tol or my bow," heat-treating specialist 
Paul Bos observed. "If you spend a lot 
of money for something, you should take 
care of it." 

The knife blades made by most mem- 
bers of the American Bladesmith Society 
are practically all forged from carbon 
steel, and more than a few members of The 
Knifemakers' Guild offer such blades — 
not to mention all the other non-affiliated 
makers who use carbon steel. On the fac- 
tory side, a number of companies use the 
steel, including Camillus and Marble's 
(0170-6C), Ka-Bar and Ontario/Queen (D- 

2 and 1095), TOPS and Browning (1095), 
Benchmade (D-2 and M-2), Chris Reeve 
Knives and BlackHawk/MOD (A-2) and 
Cold Steel (Carbon V) among them. 

What is a carbon steel? For the pur- 



8'- 



.?■■>> 






E2E 






FEBRUARY 2006 



blademag.com 



BLADE / 43 



1 1 1 •till 3 I J 1 1 




CONTINUING THE QUEST FOR 
BEAUTIFUL DESIGNS AND 
INCOMPARABLE QUALITY 



ViHr 



Adam Fox 

Carmel, California 
(831)624-5244 

Advance Cutlery 

5 stores in So. California 
(626) 445-6066 

American Flags & Cutlery 
Ventura, CA 
(805)641-1941 

Beck's Cutlery 
Cary. North Carolina 
(800) 397-3830 
www. beckscutie ry.com 

Cutlery Corner 

2 stores in Utah 
(801)225-9471 
www. cutl erycorner.com 

Edgewater Cutlery 
San Luis Obispo, CA 
(805) 541-2997 

Excalibur Cutlery 
9 stores in OR & WA 
(800) 366-7405 
www.excaliburcutlery.com 

Fanno's Cutlery 
Chico, CA 
(530)895-1762 

George & Son 
Portland, OH 
(503) 227-2087 

Guns & Knives 
Ft. Lauderdale, FL 
(954) 735-8829 
www. gunsandknives.com 

J.T. Knives 

Port Jervis, NY 
(845) 856-6904 
www.jtknives.com 

Nag el's Gun Shop 

>, TX 
(210) 342-8171 

Nashville Knife Shop 

Nashville, Indiana 
(812) 988-9800 
www.nashvilleshop.com , 

Nordic Knives 
Solvang, CA 
(805) 688-3612 
www. nordicknives.com 




Model #670 
Blade steel S30V 
Carbon fiber scales 
Brushed stainless bolsters 
Optomizer locking system 



175 piece edition 
S249.95 



laza Cutlery 

ta Mesa, CA 

14)549-3932 

:acutl ery.com 

R & J Cutlery 

Victorville, CA 
(760)241-3124 

issance Revival 

Bend, OR 

(541)382-7377 

www.renrev.com 

Spartan Cutlery 

Spokane, WA 

(509) 482-7554 

The Edge 

4 stores in So. California 

(858) 573-2663 

www.cutlerscupboard.com 

Thee Cutlery 

Manhattan Beach, CA 
(310) 545-5717 

The Knife Gallery 
Brea & Orange, California 
(714)990-0556 

The Knife Shop 

8 stores in Arizona 

(877) 790-5800 

•" " w. t h ekn i f e sho p . com 

World of Knives 

Crystal, MN 

(763) 533-9441 

www.safe-knife.com 

We Be Knives 

San Francisco, CA 

(415)982-9323 

www. webeknives.com 

Whittler's Bench 

Indianapolis, Indiana 

(317)899-5113 



Model #670 
Blade steel S30V 
wl damasteel finishing 
Carbon fiber scales 
Brushed stainless bolsters 
Optomizer locking system 
125 piece edition 
S375.00 



whittlersbench 



►on steels 

poses of this discussion, it is any steel that 
is not a corrosion-resistant one (though it 
should be noted that many carbon steels 
contain corrosion-resistant alloys). For the 
most part, a steel is corrosion resistant for 
knife use if it has 13 percent or more free 
chromium in its makeup. 

Basically, carbon steels are divided 
into categories. Among them are the tool 
steels, such as A-2, D-2, L-6, 0-1, S-7, W-l 
and W-2; the alloy steels, such as 15N20 
and 52100; the "10-series" steels, such as 
1050, 1060, 1070, 1075/1080, 1084 and 
1095; and the spring steels, such as 5160. 
Though not designed specifically for the 
purpose, most of these steels have been 
used in knife blades for many years. "I've 



Visit www.nicacutlery.org for 
locations & information about NICA 



What The Alloys Do* 

'Carbon: Increases edge retention and 
raises tensile strength; also increases 
hardness and improves resistance to 
wear and abrasion; 

'Chromium: Increases hardness, ten- 
sile strength and toughness; also pro- 
vides resistance to wear and corrosion; 

'Cobalt: Increases strength and hard- 
ness, and permits quenching in higher 
temperatures; also intensifies the indi- 
vidual effects of other alloys in more 
complex steels; 

'Copper: Increases corrosion resis- 
tance; 

'Manganese: Increases hardenability, 
wear resistance and tensile strength; 
deoxidizes and degasifies to remove 
oxygen from molten metal; and, in 
larger quantities, increases hardness 
and brittleness; 

'Molybdenum: Increases strength, 
hardness, hardenability and toughness; 
also improves machinability and resis- 
tance to corrosion; 

'Nickel: Adds strength and toughness; 

'Nitrogen: Used in place of carbon for 
the steel matrix. The nitrogen atom 
will function in a similar manner to the 
carbon atom but offers unusual advan- 
tages in corrosion resistance; 

'Phosphorous: Improves strength, ma- 
chinability and hardness; also creates 
brittleness in high concentrations; 

'Silicon: Increases strength; also deoxi- 
dizes and degasifies to remove oxygen 
from molten metal; 

'Sulfur: When added in minute quanti- 
ties, improves machinability; 

'Tungsten: Adds strength, toughness 
and improves hardenability; and; 

'Vanadium: Increases strength, wear 
resistance and toughness. 

*From the 2005 Spyderco catalog. 



44 / BLADE 



blademag.com 



FEBRUARY 2006 



seen some old Randalls and some of the 
older trench knives made out of 0-1 and 
1095 that made it through a couple of wars 
and held up pretty good," Bos noted. 

In fact, until recent years, many factory 
knife users complained that the corrosion- 
resistant steels were not as tough, were 
more difficult to sharpen and did not hold 
an edge as long as carbon steels. However, 
according to Crucible Steel's Scott Devan- 
na, today's premium corrosion-resistant 
steels such as CPM S30V, BG-42, ATS-34, 



Marble's is one of 
several knife compa- 
nies that uses car- 
bon steel for blades. 
In the case of the 
Fieldcraft model, 
the steel is 0170-6C. 
Overall length: 
7 3/4 inches. 
MSRP: $60-$70. 




154CM, VG-10 and 440C have more car- 
bides and are thus more wear resistant and 
hold an edge much better, and are tougher 
than their predecessors. And, of course, 
they are corrosion resistant, a key factor 
among many people who do not want to 
bother with knife maintenance. 

So why carbon steels? For one thing, 
since they are less wear resistant than the 
premium corrosion-resistant steels, even 
though they may not hold an edge longer, 
they are usually easier to sharpen. 

For another, despite the fact that cor- 
rosion-resistant steels can be heat treated 
to increase their toughness, Devanna said 
that carbon steels, as a rule, remain inher- 
ently tougher. Even though the edge hold- 
ing of most carbon-steel blades will break 
down quicker than those of the blades of 
the premium corrosion-resistant steels, 
carbon-steel blades of 5160, 0-1, 1095, 
52100, L-6 and others are tougher and will 
withstand "side loading" or bending, and 
will resist chipping longer. The carbon 
steels' toughness makes them particularly 
good at chopping, one of the qualities in 
demand in today's cutting competitions. 
Carbon steels are also much easier to dif- 
ferentially heat treat — heat treating the 
blade so that the spine is soft and the edge 
is hard, believed by some another advan- 
tage in chopping — than corrosion-resis- 
tant steels. 

As noted in last issue's story on cor- 



wolf tuff 





LONE WOLF KNIVES 



Evolution eliminates bad design and 
construction in plants, animals and 
equipment. We build our Tactical 
Knives, "Wolf Tuff." Seven million years 
of evolution has perfected the wolf and 
Lone Wolf Knives has perfected the 
folding tactical knife. All Lone Wolf 
Tactical knives utilize the best design, 
materials and construction available. 
They are built to survive where others 
will fail. 

• CPM-S30V blade 
•Titanium liners 

• Master-Grip™ handle design 

• Designer - William (Bill) Harsey 

• Lifetime Warranty 



17400 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road, Suite 240, Portland, OR 97224 



www.lonewolfknives.com 



FEBRUARY 2006 



blademag.com 



BLADE / 45 



TACTICAL OIVISION 





DOG 

FRAME LOCK 4.5 BLADE 
$495.00 US 



NO PRINTED CATALOG 



phone:780/846 2812 

fax:780/846-2813 

RR 02 Kitscoty, AB 

Canada TOB 2P0 



www.liahtfootknives.com 




Feb. 4 & 5, 2006 

SAT: Sam - 5pm SlJN: 9am - 4pm 

Little Rock, AR 

Robinson Center Exhibit Hall 

424 W. Markham (adjacent to the DoubleTree Hotel) 



Knife Supplies 
Open to the Public 

Admission $5 
Airport Shuttle 



Special Show Hotel Rate: 
$92 single/dbl. $102 triple $112 quad 

reserve by january 5, 2006 
800/937-2789 501/372-4371 



AWARDS • CUSTOM KNIVES • KNIFE AUCTION 



Arkansas Custom Knife Show Partial List of Tableholders 9/21/2005 



Jerome Anders 
David Anders 
Russ Andrews 
Larry Bailey 
Reggie Barker 
Craig Braschler 
Sam Butler 
Craig Camerer 
James Cook 
Gary Crowder 
JimCrowell 
Ken Durham 
Fred Durio 
Rodger Echols 
Shawn Ellis 
Lee Ferguson 
Jerry Fisk 
John Fitch 
Joe Flournoy 
Muller Forge 
Ronnie Foster 
Brett Catlin 



Terry Glassco 
Cordon Graham 
John Greco 
Mike Johnson 
Nate Kelsey 
Harvey King 
Ray Kirk 
Tom Krein 
Jerry Lairson, Sr. 
Dr. James Lucie 
Magee Knives 
John Martin 
Roger Massey 
Jerry McClure 
Jerry McDonald 
Ron Mobbs 
Sidney Moon 
Gary Mulkey 
Bob Neal 
MarkNevling 
Corbin Newcomb 
Ron Newton 



Douglas Noren 
Henry Parker 
James Parks 
John Perry 
Pete Peterson 
Benjamin Piccola 
Cliff Polk 
Rusty Polk 
J. W. Randall 
Vernon Red 
Lin Rhea 
Dennis Riley 
Les Robertson 
Dickie Robinson 
James Rodebaugh 
George Roth 
Michael Ruth 
Richard Self 
Marvin Solomon 
Charles Stout 
Brion Tomberlin 
ArtTycer 



Jim Walker 
Chuck Ward 
John Weever 
John White 
Mike Williams 
Curtis Wilson 
Gary Zweimueller 



Suppliers 
Giraffebone.com 
Green River Leather 
Mother of Pearl 
Pop Knife Supplies 
Riverside Machine 
Rowe's Leather 
Texas Knifemakers 
Supply 

American Bladesmith 
Society 
Knife World 
Knifemakers Guild 



lit" ANNUAL SHOW 
www.arkansasknifemakers.com 



Arkansas 



David Etchieson 501/472-8446 email: aka@alliancecable.net 



caroon si 

rosion-resistant steels ("It's a Question of 
Balance"), edge geometry is a key ingredi- 
ent in the overall performance of a knife. 
Devanna said there is a debate in some 
circles that, due to their toughness, carbon 
steels such as 1084 and 1095, if ground to 
a super-thin edge, will hold up better than 
most corrosion-resistant steels with the 
same edge geometry. However, Devanna 
stressed, the jury is still out on the debate. 

Costs 

Why are carbon steels less expensive? For 
one thing, they are cheaper to make. The 
very wear-resistant properties that enable 
the premium corrosion-resistant steels to 
hold an edge longer also make them hard- 
er on belts, grinders and other knifemak- 
ing equipment. 



"With regular 

care and 

maintenance, 

carbon steels can 

be kept relatively 

rust free." 

— the author 



Carbon steels also are less expensive to 
heat treat. "Most knifemakers with small 
ovens or torches can heat treat most of the 
carbon steels if they know what they're do- 
ing. 0-1 and 1095 don't take a long soak 
like the corrosion-resistant steels," Bos ad- 
vised. "With 0-1 and 1095, you bring [ei- 
ther one] to temperature, hold it a couple 
of minutes and quench it and you get the 
transformation right away. It takes a lot 
more to [heat treat] stainless." 

Last of all, the carbon steels simply cost 
less. According to Terry Summers of Ad- 
miral Steel, at press time, a 1/8 x 1 1/2-inch 
bar of CPM S30V that is 6 feet long cost 
$120. The same-size piece of ATS-34 cost 
$51.42. The same-size piece of 1095 cost 
$13.38. Why the differences in price? 

Summers said that in addition to be- 
ing more expensive to process, some of 
the key alloys in CPM S30V, such as va- 
nadium, are more costly. In fact, Devanna 
noted, over the past two years, several of 
the alloys have skyrocketed in price. For 
instance, in September 2003, vanadium 
was $4.43 per pound. In May 2005, it was 
$57.67 per pound. Moreover, molybdenum, 
an alloy that enhances a number of blade 
qualities (see sidebar), cost just over $6 per 
pound in September 2003. In May 2005, 



46 / BLADE 



blademag.com 



FEBRUARY 2006 



Carbon steels of 5160 — on the wide 
blade — and 1095 comprise the blades of 
Mace Vitale's knives. Overall lengths: 17 
inches. (Point Seven photo) 




that cost leaped to $36.81. 

The increase is due to a number of fac- 
tors. For one, Chinese industry is consum- 
ing so much more of the steels/alloys that 
the demand for them is much higher. Plus, 
some of the alloys are no longer made in 
the USA and the cost of buying them off- 
shore has jumped. 



According to Devanna, the higher costs 
have had more of an impact on the factory 
side than the handmade. "The custom guys 
can absorb the increase better because the 
percentage of the price of the steel as op- 
posed to the overall [selling] price of a 
handmade knife is much less than in a fac- 
tory knife," he noted. Plus, custom knife- 



makers can recoup the cost of the 
steel by adding gemstones, gold 
or embellishments to their knives. 
Also, Devanna said, labor makes 
up a much larger percentage of the 
cost of a factory knife, and Chi- 
nese labor is much cheaper than 
American labor. Finally, there 
are the obvious differences in 
the sheer numbers of knives pro- 
duced between factory and hand- 
made. Hence, when U.S. factory 
costs increase, some U.S. factory 
knife companies may have to opt 
for a lower-grade — and thus less 
expensive — steel. 

As for availability, you can 
get such carbon steels as 0-1 and 
1095 from tool-and-die stores and 
most steel companies, whereas 
the premium corrosion-resistant 
steels are available only through 
Crucible, Timpken, Allegheny 
Ludlum, Admiral Steel and the 
like, Bos noted. Even so, accord- 
ing to Devanna, the carbon steels, 
at least in the sizes used by knife- 
makers, are not as ever-present as 
they once were. 

"I think the family of [steels] 
in those sizes has been drying up, 
and one of the reasons for that is 
that the applications for which 
those steels are used have gone 
overseas," he explained. "For example, 
[Crucible has] a large customer in Mexico 
that makes leaf springs for cars. They use 
tons and tons and tons of 5160. At one time, 
those leaf springs were probably made in 
the USA." 

Meanwhile, supplies of some carbon 



Carbon Steels By The Alloys" 



Steel Carbon Chromium Cobalt Copper Manganese 



enum Nickel Nitrogen Phosphorous Silicon Sulfur Tungsten Vanadium 



1050 


0.48-0.55 


n/a 


n/a 


n/a 


0.60-0.90 


n/a 


n/a 


n/a 


n/a 


n/a 


n/a 


n/a 


n/a 


1060 


0.55-0.65 


n/a 


n/a 


n/a 


0.60-0.90 


n/a 


n/a 


n/a 


n/a 


n/a 


n/a 


n/a 


n/a 


1070 


0.65-0.75 


n/a 


n/a 


n/a 


0.60-0.90 


n/a 


n/a 


n/a 


n/a 


n/a 


n/a 


n/a 


n/a 


1080 


0.75-0.88 


n/a 


n/a 


n/a 


0.60-0.90 


n/a 


n/a 


n/a 


n/a 


n/a 


n/a 


n/a 


n/a 


1095 


0.90-1.03 


- 


- 


- 


0.30-0.50 


- 


- 


- 


0.04 


- 


0.05 


- 


- 


5160 


0.56-0.64 


0.70-0.90 


- 


- 


0.75-1.00 


- 


- 


- 


0.04 


0.15-0.30 


- 


- 


- 


52100 


0.98-1.10 


1.30-1.60 


- 


- 


0.25-0.45 


- 


- 


- 


0.03 


0.15-0.30 


0.03 


- 


- 


CPM3V 


0.80 


7.50 


- 


- 


- 


1.30 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2.75 


CPMM4 


1.40 


4.00 


- 


- 


0.30 


5.25 


- 


- 


- 


0.55 


0.06 


5.50 


4.00 


A-2 


1.00 


5.25 


- 


- 


0.85 


1.10 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.25 


D-2 


1.55 


11.50 


- 


- 


- 


0.90 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.80 


L-6 


0.70 


0.75 


- 


n/a 


- 


0.25 


1.50 


n/a 


n/a 


- 


n/a 


- 


- 


M-2 


1.00 


4.15 


- 


- 


- 


5.00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


6.40 


1.95 


0-1 


0.85-1.00 


0.40-0.60 


- 


- 


1.00-1.40 


- 


0.30 


- 


- 


0.50 


- 


- 


0.30 


S-7 


0.50 


3.25 


- 


n/a 


0.70 


- 


- 


n/a 


n/a 


0.30 


n/a 


- 


- 


W-l 


0.70-1.50 


0.15 


- 


- 


0.10-0.40 


0.10 


0.20 


- 


- 


0.10-0.40 


- 


0.50 


0.10 


W-2 


0.85-1.50 


0.15 


- 


- 


0.10-0.40 


0.10 


0.20 


- 


- 


0.10-0.40 


- 


0.15 


0.15-0.35 


Vascowear 1.12 


7.75 


- 


- 


0.30 


1.60 


- 


- 


- 


1.20 


- 


1.10 


2.40 


0170-6 


0.95 


0.45 


- 


n/a 


0.40 


- 


- 


n/a 


n/a 


0.25 


u/a 


- 


0.20 



*Steels listed in no particular order except alphabetically where applicable; information gleaned from the 2006 Spyderco catalog, The 
Complete Bladesmith by Jim Hrisoulas, and Wayne Goddard's Wonder of Knifemaking. Any misinformation or mistakes are the 
editor's, not Spyderco's, Mr. Hrisoulas' nor Mr. Goddard's. 



FEBRUARY 2006 



blademag.com 



BLADE / 47 




V-w 



What would happen if... 

Thousands of fine people lost their lifetime hob- 
bies in the 2004 hurricane season. Collectibles 
ranging from antique weapons of many types, to 
19th century political ephemera, model railroads 
and glass figurines were sadly destroyed. Did in- 
surance help many of these victims? In too many cases, the answer was, "NO." 

I've been a collector all of my life — even before I became the owner of a firm that specializes 
in providing insurance for thousands of collectibles. I know what it's like to lose the treasures of 
a lifetime hobby. Here's a lesson I learned that I'd like to pass along to you: Homeowners 
insurance is rarely, if ever, adequate for collectibles — especially books. Take a minute now and 
call, write or e-mail us for brochures that can help your peace of mind. 

Z^W \Ajalktr 



We INSURE Edged Weapons at Attractive Rates. 



• Sample collector rates: $3,000 for $15, $10,000 
for $49, $25,000 for $123, and with a safe or alarm, $50,000 
for $228, $75,000 for $289, $100,000 for $438, $2.00 
per $1,000 above $100,000. 

■ Our insurance carrier is AM Best's rated A+ (Su- 
perior). 

• We insure scores of major collectibles from used 
and edged weapons to historic firearms. "One-stop" 
service for practically everything you collect. 



■ Replacement value. We use expert help valuing col- 
lectible losses. Consumer friendly service: Our office 
handles your loss — you won't deal with a big insurer 
who doesn't know collectibles. 

■ Detailed inventory and/or professional appraisal 
not required. Collectors list items over $5,000, dealers 
no listing required. 

■ See our website (or call, fax, e-mail us) for full infor- 
mation, including standard exclusions. 



We KNOW Collectibles! 

I 3 M Collectibles 

! Z£s3 Insurance Agency 

P.O. Box 1200-BLD • Westminster MD 21158 
E-Mail: info@insurecollectibles.com 

www. collectinsure . com 



Get A Rate Quote! 
Call Toll Free: 
1-888-837-9537 

Fax:(410)876-9233 



steels, such as 1084, are drying up. As a 
result, there is a movement afoot among 
some knifemakers to develop a new carbon 
steel especially for knife blades. BLADE® 
will keep you posted on that movement as 
it progresses. 

Pressures 

While pressures from both inside and 
outside the USA affect the state of knife 
steels, two things would appear to be clear: 
China's drain on corrosion-resistant steels 
will continue and carbon steels, such as 
the beginning knifemaker's favorite, 5160, 
will continue to thrive. 

"As long as they make leaf springs for 
cars and trucks, there will probably be 
plenty of 5160," Devanna said. "There's no 
way around that." 

Bottom line: carbon steels will con- 
tinue to be user and maker friendly, and 
their proponents will remain many for the 
foreseeable future. 

For the contact information for the story 
sources and the knives pictured herein, see 
"Where To Get 'Em " on page 95. 



Handle Material - Reconstituted 
Stone, Micartas, Stabilized Woods, 
Mother of Pearl, Water Buffalo, Mam- 
moth Ivory, Exotic Woods, plus many 
more! 

Metals - Nickel Silver, Brass, Stain- 
less Steel, Titanium, Damascus, D2, 
154CM, 01 Toolsteel, Forging Steels, 
ATS34, 440C and more 



Blade Kits are available for most 
blades. 





1 "-fH 


II 



Example Shown Above: Finest 

Filet Kit - BL546K 
Includes blade, Dymondwood 
handle material, nickel-silver 
guard, pins, & thong hole tub- 
ing & 30 minute epoxy. Only 
$30.95 





Texas 

Knifemaker's 

Supply 



WANT SAME DAY SHIPPING? 

Call our Toll-free, Express Hot-line, 

1-888-461-8632, before 2 p.m. 

Central time, Monday-Friday, 

and all supplies that are in-stock, 

will be shipped the same day. 

*Please ask for same day shipping. 



Heat Treating & Cryogenic Quenching 

*Air Quenchable Steel Only for Heat Treat 



Knifemaking Equipment 

Buffing Supplies 

Heat Treating Ovens 

Mosaic Pins 

Etching Equipment 

Finished Blades - Stainless 

Steel, Carbon Steel, Damascus 

Sheaths - Leather, Kydex 
Sheath Making Kits & 
Supplies, Knife Cases 




Catalog $4.00 ($10.00 

International) or Free if 

placing order. 



Shop on-line 24/7 at www.texasknife. 



Texas Knifemaker's Supply 
Toil-Free 888-461-8632 



10649 Haddington, #180 
Fax 713-461-8221 



Houston, TX 77043 
Tel. 713-461-8632 



48 / BLADE 



blademag.com 



FEBRUARY 2006 



in the Heart of the USA 



El 




I 



El 



Philippe Grifnee 

Engraving with Philippe 
His works and techniques • August 7 



11 



Giacomo Fausti • Giovanni Steduto • Ugo Talenti 

Italian Techniques of Bulino 
As demonstrated by Creative Art • August 14-18 




'^u^d Q^tad/e<^ c/ vwtMwm 2006 



f n August 2006, experienced engravers will have 
an extraordinary opportunity to study under some of 
Europe's finest masters in a special program in 
Emporia, Kansas. Philippe Grifnee of Liege, Belgium 
commissioned by Holland & Holland and Purdey of 
London, England -AND- Giacomo Fausti, Giovanni 
Steduto, and Ugo Talenti of the renowned firm Creative 
Art, Gardone Val Trompia, Italy, will instruct the 
2006 GRS Grand Masters Program. 

This program will specialize in the individual 
techniques of these Grand Master engraving artists. 
Their work is extraordinarily rich and beautiful with the 
style and grace that result from generations of artistry 
born and refined in Belgium and Italy. These two 5-day 
courses will be held on successive weeks for up to 
12 people per course. Attendees may request a seat 
in either program or both. 

This is a rare opportunity for engravers 

worldwide to learn the exquisite techniques 

of these European Grand Masters. 

Already in its second year, the GRS Grand Masters 
Program is dedicated to the art of engraving and 
open to a wide variety of engraving methods including 
hand gravers, chasing hammers, and power-assisted 
handpieces. Every bench will be equipped with GRS 
tools including a GraverMax and stereo microscope, 
but attendees may bring other gravers, hammers and 
power tools. 

Limited to proficient engravers, all participants 
must qualify by submitting photographic examples of 
their work. Applications are confidential; the deadline is 
March 31, 2006. Interested people should CALL NOW 
1-800-835-3519 in USA, or e-mail GRS@GrsTools.com 
and request 2006 Grand Masters Program information. 
Hurry... this program will fill early. 




Glendo Corporation 
900 Overlander Road 
Emporia, KS 66801 USA 

1-800-835-3519 

e-mail: GRS@GrsTools.com 

www.GrsTools.com 



www.grandmastersprogram.com 



el tribute 

eel tribute 



» 



THE AUTHOR CREATES A COMBINATION 
KMTe/hISTORICAL TRIBUTE TO THE . 
BATTJ.E OT ^HE BUL<J§. 



By Murad Sayen 



I 



3^ 



!V 



Superimposed over the cem- 
etery near Bastogne of the 
scores who died in the Battle 
of the Bulge is the author's La 
Bastogne dagger. The blade 
is damascus forged by ABS 
master smith Robbin Hudson 
of shrapnel unearthed from the 
actual battlefield. The handle 
is ancient walrus ivory and 
the gemstone in the pommel 
is a garnet. The junction of 
the quillons and the body of 
the guard are bound by a 
continuous carved band A 
inlaid with 24k gold. In 
the author's words, "the 
band symbolizes the 
bonds of honor and 
duty that bind all 
soldiers to their 
destiny, what- 
ever it may be." 
(SharpByCoop. 
com photo) 







!J M 



50 / BLADE 






blademag.com 



FEBRUARY 2006 




Row upon row of white crosses bear 
testimony to the supreme sacrifices 
and matchless bravery displayed during 
the Battle of the Bulge. (Sam Sayen 
photo) 



Over the decades I have accumu- 
lated a store of ideas that sit in 
the back of my mind like dormant 
seeds. Apparently, most of them are des- 
tined to remain there and never actually 
come to fruition. There just is not enough 
time for all of them to develop. However, 
occasionally an idea will receive a jolt 
from the outside world that stirs up the 
energy it holds, causing it to germinate, 
and sets the process of actually creating 
an artwork in motion. 

So it was with the idea for a dagger 

I have named La Bastogne. It exists to 
commemorate the Battle of the Bulge — 
along with the Normandy invasion, one 
of Europe's two most pivotal World War 

II conflicts. 

No doubt many readers are aware that 
the Bulge refers to the bulging salient in 
Allied lines brought about by a desper- 
ate, last-ditch counter-offensive ordered 
by Adolph Hitler in December 1944. At a 
time when the Allied leadership believed 
Germany was on the ropes, the Germans 
covertly amassed 30 divisions, almost 
200,000 troops, including entire SS Pan- 
zer divisions — some even equipped with 
the latest model King Tiger tank — at a 
jumping off point in the Ardennes region, 
a hilly and heavily forested area in south- 
eastern Belgium. 





FEBRUARY 2006 



blademag.com 



BLADE / 51 




Website: 
www.knifemaking.com 



JAIHTZ SUPPLY 

P.O. Box 584 BL Davis, OK 73030 

Your 'source' for knifemaking suppties 

ALL AT THE BEST PRICES! Add $8.05 per order for shipping. 



ORDER TOLL FREE 

1-800-351-8900 

24 Hour FAX 

1-580-369-3082 



TOOLS * BLADES * STEEL * RIVETS * MACHINERY * FINISHING SUPPLIES * WE HAVE IT ALL! 



5 



El.KiTKD-CHICM LTOHNC 



1 




KOII2 I'ersonuliwH'lus.. 



..1711.1*5 



WEEKEND PROJECT KITS 

Include 440C Stainless blade, handle 
material, pins and instructions. 
RENAISSANCE DAGGER KIT 



OvjteiII Icnalb is ft 1/4" 



SS167K Renaissance Kit.. 



ass 



COBRA KIT 

Overall lenKth is 7 3/8" 



SSIfiAK conraMl 11.95 

SPORTSMAN KIT 

Overall length is 7 3/8" 



5 






SS164K Sportsman Kit 12.95 

LETTER OPENER KIT 

Overall length is 8 1/2" 

SS2ft1 k Letter upener Kit .9.95 

FISHERMAN'S FILLET KIT 

Sharp, utAiuii. >id,i»v» »re^j wlade is 
12" overall. Easy to make. 

SSI99K Fisherman Kit 9.95 

ALASKAN FILLET KIT 

Surgical steel blade lb" overall. Easy to 

make. 

SS912K Alaskan Kit 11.95 



LEATHER HONING BELTS 

Use wilh while rcjuue lo sharpen and polish. 

AU200 I x 30 Leather Bell 9.95 

AG201 1 x42 Lealher Bell 1135 

FELT POLISHING BELTS 

Use wilh mugc or other compounds tor 
polishing, 

KS501 I"x30" Fell 12.50 

KS502 r p x42" Fell 14.50 

KS503 T\1T Fell 16.50 

SATIN BRITK BELTS 
Quick and easy way to Satin finish a 
blade. Specify coarse, medium or line 
when ordering. 

CN1.TO I"x30" 9.95 

CN142 l"x42" 10.95 

cmnvKiv 15.95 



RIVETS AND 
DRILLS 



*/ 



C'orhy lype rivets are precision machined 
of solid brass 5/16" heads s tolled for easy 
installation. 

Cutlery lype rivels available in brass or 
nickle silver wilh 5/16" heads and 1/2" 
shanks. Use RD3 for corny riveLs or RD4 
for cutlery rivets for perfect countersink 
and alignment 

CP601 Pkg. 12 Corbv Rivets 14.64 

RD3 Corhy Rivet Drill 24.95 

RV12S Pkjj. 25 Brass Cutlery 4.95 

RV125 Pkjj. 25 Nickle Silver Cutlery 5.50 
RD4 Cutlery Rivet Drill ...24.95 



L^&IM&JkBE' 



Standard Panavise with 360 u )a 

rotation and I SO tilt. Perfect \ tM J 

angle for any job 2 1/2" nylon \ / J *^j 

jaws withstand heat to 2WF. 



>i*d. ' 



\>\tt\\ St.mrlaidP.immsi ... 



f „J4 + 95 



CUSTOM KITS 

l"hc kits below include stainless stisc! pre-shaped 
blade, brass rivets, tubing, guard and handle 
malerial and slep-by-slep instruclkms. 

WASHITA HUNTER 



SS463 Washita Blade only 21.95 

SS463K Washila Kit .30.25 



SIOUX HUNTER 



7 W overall wilh 3 ntade 

SS458 Sioux Blade «nlv 19.95 

SS458K Complete Kit 2S.95 



APACHE HUNTER 



H 1/4" overall wilh .1 1/2" hljuic 

SMI, I Apache Blade only.... 19.95 

SS461K CSmplete Kit .: 2S.9S 

CHEYENNE HUNTER 



L > l/S" ovL-rall with 4 1/2 elude 

SS495 Chevenne Blade onlv 19.95 

SS495K Complete Kit .". 2K.95 



RAW SKINNER 



7 1/3" overall wilh r blade 

SS7K2 Kuw Blade onlv 24.95 

SS7S2K Complete Kit.: 32.6S 

NAVA.IO SKINNER 



8 7/R" overall wilh 4 1/4" Made 
s s - :< 3 Navajo Blade only . 
SS7S3K Complete Kit 



.J0.25 



IHOW TO MAKE KNIVES 
By Richard W. Barney and Robert W. 
Loveless, Be*1 Seller. 
BO K 101 1 1 .95 

I HOW TO MAKE F0I DING KNIVES 

] A Slep-by-Slep How-To by Ron Lake, 
I Frank Cenlofiuite and Wayne Clay 



IBOKM2- 



,.12.7* 



CUSTOM KNIFEMAKING 

By Tim McCrelghl 

BOSCK . ..„. „..,. 17.96 

THE COMPLETE BLADESMITH 
l-orgiog Your Way to Perfection 
By Jim Hrisoulas 
BOP30 1 , .19,95 



tVVISOR' 



MAGNIFIERS 

Best magnifiers available, 

^q^- adjustable headband fits 

J^ ^ all. Easily worn over glass- 

l^^^^v es - Lenses are ground & 

^^F polished prismatic lype. 

Made in USA. 

New tight available $1 7.95 



Order # 
OVDA2 
OVDA3 
OVDA4 
OVDA5 
OVDA7 



Power 
I-J/2 
1-3/4 

2 
2-1/2 
2-.V4 



Wk, Disl. 
20" 
14" 
10" 
8" 
6" 



Price 
$29.95 
$29.95 
$29.95 
$31.95 
$32.95 



J3A.J_.DOJR 




CAT.* H.P. 



3yr. 
Warranty 



SHAFT 
RPM 1)1 A. PRICE 



BL114 1/4 1800 1/2" 169.95 

BL111 1/3 3600 1/2" 169.95 

BL332B 3/4 1800 3/4" 356.95 

BL333B 3/4 3600 3/4" 356.95 



KNIFE SHARPENING KIT 

I sed by prolcssimiaJs lur razor clean edges on 
cutlery. One wlteel for sharpemng, another for 
cleaning and polishing, all compounds and 
instructions included- Includes bushings to fit 
SflF' or 1/2" arbor. 

WKS800 8" se* 19.95 




WHEEL & COMPOUND KIT 

Kit includes;: 
Four 3/4" 
it wed muslin 
wheels one 
3/4" loose 
muslin wheel, 
one each grease less brush-on culling com- 
pound in grils 240, 320 and 400. one blcndine, 
bar,, one bar of while run tie and a 
polishing guide. 

Specify Arbor Size {\/2'\ 5/8", 3/4") 

6 M Kit„„ 59,95 

R" Kit „ 79.95 

10" Kit 99.95 



TRADITIONAL 
CUTLERY KIT 




1 1 pe. traditional style culler? sel mclude* pre- 
shaped surgical stainless blades shown above 
plus handle material, and rivets. Carving set 
and Steak sal also available. 

SSH01 1 1 pe. Traditional Set 69.95 

SSK07 Carving Set ..„ I9.9S 

KSS03 Steak Set 27.95 



wimi 



SQUARE WHEEL 
BELT GRINDER 




The Ultimate knifemakens grinder. 2 x 72 belt, 
tC'eontaci wheel. I hp, H5/230v4600sfpm, 

GGSW Model 4 1 03 1 299.00 



UNIQUE BLADES 

Made from 440C Stuinless Sice I. Kits include 
blade, Dymondwoocl handle material, pins, and 
instruction!;. 

MONARCH 

Overall length 7", blade 4 1/8". 

SS262 Gui Hook Blade 9.9S 



SS262K Mralarth Kil 

DOLPHM 

SSS71 Blade 


11.95 

10.95 


SS571K Kil 


12.95 


KODIAK 

Overall length 6 1/8", t 

SS26T Kodiak Blade , 

SS261K Kndiak Kit 


8.95 

12.9S 


THE SHARK 

Overall length S 1/2". 
blade length 2 7/8", 
2 3/4" 

SSI74 Shark Blade 

SS176K Shark Kit 


9.9a 

11. .95 






5 



HIDDEN TANG KITS 

440-C .Slainless blades. Kils supplied wilh 
blade, brass guard, threaded pommel and block 
of Dymondwood handle material. 

LONESTAR HOWIK KIT 



I 



SS4U7 Blade on]) 28.95 

SS497K Kil compttl* J9.95 

FRONTIER BOWIE 



5 



SS914 frontier Bla«e only.,. 15.MS I 

SS914K Frontier Kit _ 29.95 | 

CAPE SKINNER 



SS91 1 Cape Blade onlv 19.95 

SS911KCape Kit „ J4.95 



LEATHER SHEATH SUPPLIES 

Books, Lealher, eyelets, rivels, dyes. Call lor 

your special heeds. 

BOOKS 

BOH6U7 ABC's of Lealher 4.95 

K! II lf.n.1 Leatbemort Manual 12.95 

8-9 OZ. LEATHER SHEETS 

Top quality vcgclablc tanned leather. 

AGS 1 2 12 x 12". _ _ 9.95 

AC524 12 * 24" _ 18.95 

AUTOMATIC SEWING AWL KIT 
Sews an anlomatie loek Milch just like a machine. 
QMnes wilh 2 1/2 yard black ihread, one Bdttigh] 
and one curved diamond point needle, wrench 
and instructions, 

OS4130 Kit 14.25 

DELUXE SNAPSETTER KIT 
Easy 10 use hand snap sec, Includes 25 of the 
#24 slandard nickle plated brass snaps. 

OS2300 Snap .Set Kit 23.95 

TANNERS BOND CEMENT 
Waierproof eemeni pem^aiwntly bonds Lealher 
andKydex. 

WV700 Tanners Ikind ........................3.95 

LEATHER DYES 
Professional oil dyes, black, brown, lan. 

mahogany .3,95 each 

NEATSFOOTOIL 
100% pure lor conditioning leather. 16oz. 

VV'VtiOO 4.50 each 

BOSS HANDSTITCHER 
Wc meet any price plus you gel a free accesso- 
ry. Call for specifications and details 
TP10I 1245. 






SnO-351 -8SOO 



steer tribute 

At 0530 hours on Dec. 16, 1944, the 
German troops and tanks came barreling 
out of the wintry forest and caught the 
Allies completely by surprise. The month- 
long struggle that ensued was fought in 
bitter winter conditions by Americans 
who had begun the battle without adequate 
winter clothing and, in some cases, with- 
out weapons. Eventually, the hard-bitten 
determination of the paratroopers of the 
101st Airborne Division, "the Screaming 
Eagles" — who had been thrown into the 
breech, cut off and surrounded in the town 
of Bastogne — won out, but at a terrible 
cost in casualties. There are vast cemeter- 
ies in the area today where soldiers from 
both sides are buried. 




This overlook of the area near Bastogne 
reflects what a pastoral setting it is today. 
Only those who were there during the 
Battle of the Bulge know what kind of liv- 
ing hell it must have been in December- 
January 1944-45. (LeBerge photo) 



Shrapnel Damascus 

In September 2003, my son, Sam, a senior 
airman stationed at Ramstein Air Force 
Base in Germany, sent an e-mail telling 
me that he and some buddies were headed 
for the Bastogne area on a weekend trip to 
look around, and that they would be tak- 
ing a metal detector along. Lights flashed 
in my head. I instantly replied that if he 
could find a piece of shrapnel that could 
possibly be forged into a damascus blade, 
I would be ecstatic. 

In the woods where they searched there 
was so much metal in the ground that the 
detector would not stop whining, so they 
turned it off. Buried just beneath the sur- 
face was a broad assortment of expended 
cartridge cases, live ammo and shrapnel. A 
month later a package containing two such 
pieces was in my hands. 

I have known Robbin Hudson for de- 
cades. He was the eighth person certified 
as a master smith in the American Blade- 
smith Society — way back in 1981. I have 
long admired his work and even had the 
pleasure of building some handles for his 
blades, so I was delighted when he ex- 
pressed a keen interest in the project after I 



— KNIVES WANTED — 

Custom Handmade Knives 

One Knife or Entire Collections 
Highest Prices Paid— Quick Payment— Free Appraisals 

□cDcnccnoonDDaao 

We Also Sell the Finest Knives 
Knif emasters Custom Knives ( 1963) 

P.O. Box 208 Westport, CT 06881 
Phone: 203-226-5211 • Fax:203-226-5312 



The K NIFE C ENTER of the INTERNET 

The Original and Largest Catalog of Cutlery on the Web 



WWW.KNIFECENTER.COM 



The Only FULLY SEARCHABLE Database 

of the Cutlery Industry 

800-338-6799 



Kelly Carlson 

54 So. Holt Hill, Antrim, NH 03440 




www.carlsonknives.com 
kellycarlson@tds.net 



Ellipse 



Tel: 603-588-2765 
603-588-4223 



The fusion of 



need + desire. 




Elishewitz 



Custom Knives 



830.899.5356 
www.elishewitzknives.com 



PYTHON 



P.O. Box 3059, Canyon Lake, TX 7811 



FEBRUARY 2006 



blademag.com 



BLADE / 53 



BACK IN 

BLACK 

& BLACK 

IS BEAUTIFUL 



Al Mar 




Lanskey 

Longbow 

Masters Of Defense 

Merc Worx 

Microtech 

Mission Knife 
and Tool 

Ontario Knives 



Peak LED Solutions 

Phantom Knives 

Photon Micro Lights 

Piranha Knives 

Protech Knives 

Rob Dalton 

Round Eye Knife 
And Tool 

Ryan Wilson 
Tactical Knives 

S.O.G, 

Sheffield Knives 

Simonich Knives 

Smith And 
Wesson Knives 



Kershaw 



Super Knife 
SWAT 
Ti Knives 
Timberline 
Tool Logic 
TOPS Knives 
Victorinox 
Wenger Swiss Army 
Woodard Knives 
Xiknv 



The All Black 
Baby BOA 

Sold Exclusively 
By 

Deepak Chopra 

Phone: 925-4540595 • Fax: 925-4540289 

deepak@deepakcutlery.com 

www.deepakcutlery.com 

12pm -Spmpst 




steer tribute 




The author's son, Sam Sayen, visited the Bastogne battlefield and unearthed this 
piece of shrapnel — which the author said probably came from a bomb casing — 
that was later forged into damascus steel for the La Bastogne dagger blade by 
ABS master smith Robbin Hudson. (Sam Sayen photo) 



- The piece of shrapnel rests 
/ next to the hole from which 
., it was unearthed. (Sam 
'^Sayen photo) y ' 




described it to him on the phone. 

I sent Robbin the most likely candidate 
for the damascus. It was a longer fragment, 
too thin to be from an artillery shell, very 
likely part of a bomb casing. About nine 
months later I received a package from him 



containing a magnificent double-edged 
damascus blade over 9 inches long. A few 
hours after that I had a precise drawing of 
the handle I wanted to build for it. La Bas- 
togne was no longer merely a figment of 
my imagination. 




54 / BLADE 



blademag.com 



FEBRUARY 2006 



"La Bastogne" 

A dagger commemorating 
The Battle of the Bulge, 
Dec. 16, 1944-lan.28, 1945 

•Made: 9.25 inches of hand forged 
damascus steel, incorporating shrapnel 
recovered near the village of 
Bastogne, Belgium, in 2003. 

-Bladesmith: Robbin Hudson, ABS 
master smith since 1981. 

■Guard; ("old-rolled steel, handcarved, 
inlaid w/24k gold, with a heat-colored, 
beaten patina. 

•Handle: Ancient walrus ivory, hand- 
carved in the form of flower petals. 

•Pommel: Qild-rolled steel, carved 
in the form of a flame, inlaid w/garnet 
"blood droplet," 23k gilt in pocket. 

Sketch by Murad Sayen, 
March 26, 2005 





Anachronism That Cuts 

I consider daggers to be icons and, along 
with swords, more capable of express- 
ing symbolic and narrative meaning than 
perhaps any other form of edged weapon. 
They exist in the context of modern, hi- 
tech knifemaking as purely anachronistic 
objects, bearers of meaning and conveyors 
of myth and story. That is, in fact, precisely 
what I love about them. With this in mind, 
I wanted the overall motif to be cruciform, 
and I also decided to include the fleur-de- 
lis theme in the finials on the quillons in 
recognition of the French-speaking Walo- 
nia region where the battle occurred. 

The pommel incorporates a very nice 
garnet cabochon, which in the right light 
radiates a deep blood-red color. I used a 
stark-white piece of ancient walrus ivory 
for the haft and carved it in a lily-like flow- 
er-petal motif. The junction of the quil- 
lons and the body of the guard are bound 
by a continuous carved band inlaid with 
24k gold. The band symbolizes the bonds 
of honor and duty that bind all soldiers to 



their destiny, whatever it may be. 

It is not for me, the artist, to judge how 
successful this piece is in achieving its 
intended purpose. That is for you and any 
other knife enthusiast who might be inter- 
ested in La Bastogne. 

Row Upon Row 

The project did not end with the simple 
creation of the dagger, however. My origi- 
nal concept included the creation of a folio 
containing supporting materials that would 
allow any viewer to develop a thorough 
understanding of exactly what occurred 
during the battle. It includes photos taken 
at the time of the engagement — from U.S. 
Army archives — along with images col- 
lected during a return trip to Bastogne by 
Sam at my request. There is a map of the 
battle area, reflecting troop movements, 
and a small collection of poems written by 
Wilfred Owen. Lt. Owen died in the last 
week of World War I, and was one of the 
finest battlefield poets who ever described 
the terror and pain of infantry combat. He 




Black Blade +$1 

Piranha Bodyguard Auto $129 

New! Handle Colors Black, Blue, Purple 
6.6" 

Piranha MiniGuard Auto $129 



S Hand* Color s 



Plain or Serr 

Black, Red 

Piranha 7.3" $119 Blue, Green 

Piranha 6" $109 Purple 



8.4" Open . O ut-the- F ront 

M.O.D.Tril < 



Wood Presents ion Bo 



5.5 



Lone Wolf WWII V-J 41 




7"opei. 

Lone Wolf 



8.2" 



Lone Wolf Va 



NEW! Dou" |e Actl<l, < 



Perfect Size Auto? 

Doyble Duty $185 



rfn&ifxsp 



- 5 Handle Colors 



sriEEftlitg 




CRKT Hawk D.O.G. Auto S99 




9.5 Guardfather $79 2/ $149 




Boker Speedlock Auto $64 




7.5" 



Pocket Clips 



Boker AK74 Auto $38 2/$69 




UPS Ship $8 First Knife +$2 
Ea Additional Knife Lower 48 USA 
Credit Cards /M.O. to: Knife Mart 
596 W. 300 S., Heyburn, ID 83336 



R 



Blade Supermarket 



800 331 3213 Order! ine 



MART 



www. kn i fe ma rt . do m 



FEBRUARY 2006 



blademag.com 



BLADE / 55 



Catalogue 
$3.00 



Knife and Gun 

Finishing Supp ly 



Catalogue 
$3.00 



PO Box 458 * Lakeside * AZ * 85929 NEW AREA CODE (928V537-8877 



Damascus Billets 

Devin Thomas Stainless and Hi Carbon 



Disc Grinders 



9" Discs 

9x1 1 Sheets 

Spray Adhesive 



Belt Grinders 

1X42 Belts 
2X48 Belts 
2X72 Belts 
1X30 Belts 



Hollow Grinding Video 
Flat Grinding Video 

25 Species of Wood 

Horn 

Ivory 

Giraffe Bone 

Exotic Skins 

Leather Dye 

Epoxies 

Imitation Stag 

Steel 




Blades 




Baldor Buffers 

Buffs 6"-8"-10" 



•440c 
•ATS 34 
•D-2 
•15N20 



•1084 
•1095 
•203-E 



Multi Tool Grinder-Buffer 



Multi Tool Attachment only $310 
Jet Motor only $189 



Custom Stabilizing 

10 Years Experience 

Wood-Bone-Ivory-Horn 




Orders only 800-972- 1192 www, knifeandgun. com 




»SS»i 




Smokey Mountain Network on Dish Network 
Ch. 221 Monday & Friday Nights at 8pm.' 



Visit SMKW at eKnife Works, com w* «j| 1 1 11 

for information on... A I4illl < li 

^w mm FOR A 

Soldier 




For a FREE Catalog or 
to Place Your Order Visit... 



rtttlfeH** 



bared his soul through his poetry and his 
work is a haunting addition to the folio. 

Ed Hitchcock, a friend of mine who 
lives in Tennessee and who was a machine 
gunner in the 28th Infantry Division dur- 
ing the battle, wrote a personal statement 
describing his experience of those dark 
and frigid days. There is also a document 
from Robbin Hudson, describing the mak- 
ing of the blade, and photos of the shrap- 
nel actually being excavated in Belgium. I 
am still waiting to hear from a friend in 
Germany as to whether or not a German 
veteran will contribute a statement. 

My intent is that the dagger will be the 





am TtB 






• The ancient walrus ivory'" 
handle begins to take shape. 


. 



Visit Our Retail Showroom in Seviervitle , Tennessee! 



centerpiece of a package whose totality is 
a comprehensive and elegant reflection of 
a time in our history when men went far 
beyond what anybody could have reason- 
ably expected of them, and that it will 
serve to remind people of those long rows 
of crosses so far from home. 

For more information contact Murad 
Sayen, Dept. BL2, 50 Mountain View Dr., 
South Paris, ME 04281 207.743.7278 
muradsay@adelphia.net, www. 

shadowchasers. com. 

About the author: Murad Sayen began 
making knives in 1977, when he estab- 
lished the Black Oak Knives knife shop in 
the Ithaca Youth Bureau in Ithaca, New 
York, where he taught at-risk teens to make 
knives as he taught himself. Subsequently, 
a local manufacturer of turbine blades 
hired many of his students. In 1980 Murad 
teamed up with Don Fogg, winner of the 
Blade Magazine 2005 Industry Achieve- 
ment Award, and the two collaborated 
for many years under the name of Kemal. 
They became known for making one-of-a- 
kind art knives and won numerous awards 
for their distinctive creations. 



56 / BLADE 



blademag.com 



FEBRUARY 2006 



Amazing knives forged throughout a history of 800 years , 
which are strong , beautiful , and exceedingly sharp! 



Seki City, the City of Blades, is the 800-year-old blade capital 
of the Orient. In Seki City we have the greatest number of 
Japanese sword craftsmen in all Japan, actively work on 
passing down the inimitable craft and tradition of ^ 

Japanese sword-making from generation to 
L generation, and intent upon introducing , 
these excellent swords from 
Japan to the world. 



Photo:JB^f^TANREN 







LADE 

The World's t1 Knife Publication 

700 East State St. 
lola, Wl 54990-0001 
PH. 715-445-4612 
Fax: 7 1 5-445-4087 
www.blademag.com 

Missy Beyer, 

Advertising Sales 

ext. 642 

e-mail: 

missy.beyer@fwpubs.com 



Bruce Wolberg 
Advertising Sales 
ext. 403 
e-mail: 
bruce.wolberg@fwpubs. 




HPM 



NET EM 






2thehilt.com 
2thehilt.com 
phil@2thehilt.com 

A.G. Russell Knives, Inc. 

www.agrussell.com 

ag@agrussell.com 

Anders Hogstrom 
www.andershogstrom.com 
andershogstrom@rixmail.se 
andershogstrom@hotmail.com 

Anderson Knives 

www.cbaknives.com 

info@cbaknives.com 

Angel Sword 

www.angelsword.com 

info@angelsword.com 

Archers Knives 

www.archersknives.com 

archert@trib.com 

Arizona Custom Knives 

www.arizonacustomknives.com 

sharptalk@bellsouth.net 

Atlanta Cutlery 

www.atlantacutlery.com 

atlcut@mindspring.com 

Beckwith's Blade 

www.beckwithsblades.com 

info@beckwithsblades.com 

Benchmade 

www.benchmade.com 

Benchmade_Update@Benchmade.com 

Best Blade 

www.bestblade.com 

info@bestblade.com 

Benchmark/National Knife 
Distributors 
www.nkdi.com 
nkdi@nkdi.com 

Best Knives 

www.bestknives.com 

info@bestknives.com 

Blackstocksinc.com 

www.blackstocksinc.com 

garyz@yellville.net 

Blade Art Inc. 

www.bladeart.com 

info@bladeart.com 

Bladegallery.com 

www.bladegallery.com 

Omalley@bladegallery.com 

Bladetown 

www.bladetown.com 

customer@bladetown.com 

Blades By Brown Cutlery 

www.bladesbybrown.com 

dave@bladesbybrown.com 

Blades N Business 

www.bladesnbusiness.com 

Sales@bladesnbusiness.com 

Bob Neal Custom Knives 

www.bobnealcustomknives.com 

bob@bobnealcustomknives.com 



Bob's Knife Connection 
www.bobs-knives.com 
knifeconnection@nc.rr.com 

Brian Tighe 

www.tigheknives.com 

tighe@netcom.ca 

Bubba Knives 

www.bubbaknives.com 

warren@bubbaknives.com 

Burger Knives 

www.swordcane.com 

info@swordcane.com 

Busse Combat Knife Company 

www.bussecombat.com 

busse@bright.net 

CAS. Iberia 

www.casiberia.com 

cas@casiberia.com 

Cable Joe Knives 
http://homepage.mac. 

com/coffman/cablejoe 
cablejoeknives@earthlink.net 

Canada's Knife Zone 
Online Knife & Sword Store 
www.knifezone.ca 
sales@knifezone.ca 

Circle P Knives 

www.circlepknives.net 

paulv22@cox.net 

Cobra Imports Swords & Knives 

www.cobraimports.com 

cobraimports@aol.com 

Custom Knife Gallery of Colorado 

www.customknifegallery.com 

bob_glassman@yahoo.com 

Custom Knife Consignment 

www.customknifeconsignment.com 
bob@customknifeconsignment.com 

Custom Leather Knife Sheaths 

www.customsheaths.com 

rschrap@aol.com 

Cutlery Specialties 
www.restorationproduct.com 
Renaissance Micro-Crystalline 
Wax/Polish 
Dennis Blaine; dennis13@aol.com 

Cutting Edge Cutlery Co. 

No one in Canada has more knives 

www.swords.ca 

Dantes Knifeworks 

www.DantesKnife.com 

sales@DantesKnife.com 

E-Blades.com 

www.e-blades.com 

sales@e-blades.com 

EDC Knives 

www.edcknives.com 

blade@edcknives.com 

Every Day Carry Knives & Gear 

EdgeDealer.com 

www.edgedealer.com 

edgedealer1@yahoo.com 



Dave Ellis - "CA. 1st ABS M.S." 

www.exquisiteknives.com 

ellis@mastersmith.com 

Ernie Lyle - Knifemaker 

www.ernestlyleknives.com 

ernestlyle@msn.com 

FIRST NATIONS KNIVES, LLC 
www.firstnationsknives.com 
info@firstnationsknives.com 

John Fraps 

www.frapsknives.com 

jfraps@att.net 

Frost Cutlery 

www.frostcutlery.com 

knives@frostcutlery.com 

Gary Levine Fine Knives 

www.levineknives.com 

Gary@levineknives.com 

Georgia Knifemakers' Guild 
www.georgiaknifemakersguild.com 
"Member List, Web sites and 
Galleries" 

Ghostmaker Custom Knives 

www.ghostmakercustom.com 

admin@ghostmakercustom.com 

Grand Prairie Knives 

www.gpknives.com 

gpk@gpknives.com 

Great Lakes Custom Knives 

www.greatlakescustomknives.com 

bud@greatlakescustomknives.com 

Guild Knives - Selling 

Custom Collection, Don Guild 
www.guildknives.com 

Halpern Titanium 

www.halperntitanium.com 

info@halperntitanium.com 

HideAway Knife 

Easy to retain. Easy to conceal. 
Fast to access. 
www.hideawayknife.com 

Hoffman Knives - Selling 
Top Quality Collection - Walt 
www.hoffmanknives.com 

Independent Knife and 
Novelty 

independentknife.com 
info@independentknife.com 

Jot Singh Khalsa 

A Wise Investment in Handmade 

Knives and Swords 

www.khalsakirpans.com 

jotkhalsa@comcast.net 

Knife & Sword Auction 

www.bladebid.com 

bladebid@cs.com 

Knife Center of the Internet 

www.knifecenter.com 

info@knifecenter.com 

Knife Legends 
Handmade custom knives 
www.knifelegends.com 
pshindler@comcast.net 



Toll Free 800-272-5233 



Knife Mart 

www.knifemart.com 

sales@knifemart.com 

KnifeShows.com 

www.knifeshows.com 

tedmerchant@comcast.net 

Knives Plus 

www.KnivesPlus.com 

KnivesPlus@KnivesPlus.com 

Last Legend Competition Blades 

www.lastlegend.com 

sales@lastlegend.com 

Lee's Cutlery 

www.LeesCutlery.com 

beeneJL43@earthlink.net 

Legendary Knifemakers.com 
www.legendaryknifemakers.com 
We Buy Collections 

Lightfoot Knives 

www.lightfootknives.com 

pitbull@lightfootknives.com 

Lone Wolf Knives 

www.lonewolfknives.com 

sales@lonewolfknives.com 

Luna Knives 

www.lunaknives.com 

lunaknives@aol.com 

Mackrill Knives 

www.mackrill.co.za 

info@mackrill.co.za 

Marzitelli Custom Knives 

www.marzknives.com 

info@marzknives.com 

Charlie Mattox 

www.mattoxknife.com 

charlie@mattoxknife.com 

Moore Cutlery 

www.moorecutlery.com 

gary@moorecutlery.com 

Mother Of Pearl Co. Inc. 
www.knifehandles.com 
www.stingrayproducts.com 
mopco@earthlink.net 

Moulton Knives 

www.moultonknives.com 

dusty@moultonknives.com 

Museum Replicas 

www.museumreplicas.com 

musrep@mindspring.com 

www.myknifedealer.com 
Lynn 0. Olson 
blade@myknifedealer.com 

Nashville Knife Shop 

www.nashvilleknifeshop.com 

info@nashvilleknifeshop.com 

Neilson's Mountain Hollow 
J & Tess Neilson 
www.mountainhollow.net 
mountainhollow@emcs.net 

New Graham Knives 

www.NewGraham.com 

mdye@newgraham.com 






Nittinger Knives - Selling 
Top Quality Collection 
www.nittingerknives.com 
dave@nittingerknives.com 

Northwest School of Knifemaking 

Bronksknifeworks.com 

bronks@bronksknifeworks.com 

Ohare Knives 

sean@ohareknives.ca 

www.ohareknives.ca 

Okuden Custom Kydex 

www.okuden.net 

info@okuden.net 

Only Fine Knives 
www.onlyfineknives.com 
Specializing in William Henry & 
Chris Reeve 

Oso Famoso 

Fossil Ivory-Mammoth Bark Knife Scales 

http://www.osofamoso.com 

oso@osofamoso.com 

Peters' Heat Treating 

www.petersheattreat.com 

info@petersheattreat.com 

www.portlandknife.com 
Your source for the Northwest's 
finest knives 
sales@PortlandKnife.com 

Pratt's Collectible Cutlery 
Case, Puma, Parker, Boker, Bulldog, 
Muela, Remington 
Knife Store www.prattscutlery.com 

QuickKnife 
"Live Sharply" 
www.quickknife.com 
sales@quickknife.com 

Darrel Ralph 

www.darrelralph.com 

darrel@darrelralph.com 

Ray Jay Knives 

www.rayjayknives.com 

ray@rayjayknives.com 

Ray Rogers Handcrafted Knives 

www.rayrogers.com 

knives@rayrogers.com 

Robertson's Custom Cutlery 

www.robertsoncustomcutlery.com 

customknives@comcast.net 

Rocky Mountain Knife Works 

www.RockyMtnKnifeWorks.com 

sales@RockyMtnKnifeWorks.com 

Sentry Solutions Ltd. 

www.sentrysolutions.com 

tufcloth@sentrysolutions.com 

Smoky Mountain Knife Works 

www.eKnifeWorks.com 

webmaster@smkw.com 

Sooner State Knives 

www.soonerstateknives.com 

ssknives@swbell.net 



Spartan Cutlery 

www.knivescentral.com 

info@knivescentral.com 

Sporting Arms Custom Grips 

www.woodgrips.com 

rosewood@rascsa.co.cr 

Steel Addiction Custom Knives 

www.SteelAddictionKnives.com 

davestark@steeladdictionknives.com 

SUPER BLADES.COM 

WWW.SUPERBLADES.COM 

sales@superblades.com 

Svord Knives 

www.svord.com 

svord@xtra.co.nz 

Swamp Rat Knives 

www.swamprat.com 

info@swamprat.com 

Switchbladeking.com 

Large Selection of Automatic Knives 

Sales@SwitchBladeKing.com 

The Equipment Outpost 

www.the-equipment-outpost.com 

chad@the-equipment-outpost.com 

The Knifery 

Canada's #1 Knife Store 

www.theknifery.com 

knifery@telus.net 

The Sword Armory 

www.swordarmory.com 

sales@swordarmory.com 

Toolshop 

www.toolshop.de 

info@toolshop.de 

Trident Knives 

www.tridentknives.com 

tridentknives@yahoo.com 

True North Knives 

www.truenorthknives.com 

info@truenorthknives.com 

Twin Blades 

www.twinxblades.com 

twinblades@bulloch.net 

Viking Wholesale 

www.vikingwholesale.com 

sales@vikingwholesale.com 

Vinny's Knives 

www.vinnysknives.com 

vinny@vinnysknives.com 

Daniel Winkler 
Master Bladesmith 
www.winklerknives.com 
daniel@winklerknives.com 

Richard S. Wright 

www.richardswright.com 

rswswitchblades@hotmail.com 



pioneer maker 

■ ninnnor m sal*' car 



pioneer maker 




The author goes in 
search of A.G. Bimson 
and his World War 
II combat knives 

By Marv Clyncke 



I 



m 



60 / BLADE 



The U.S. military has always done 
a pretty good job of supplying 
equipment to its soldiers, but 
World War II came hard and fast and 
supplies to make the needed equipment 
just were not plentiful enough to meet 
the need. Many individuals stepped for- 
ward to help in the war effort. 

One such individual was A.G. Bimson 
of Berthoud, Colorado, who made knives 
and gave them to some of the local resi- 
dents who went off to war. 

Berthoud was only 9 years old when 
Bimson arrived from Quincy, Illinois, on 
Sept. 12, 1890. Born in Quincy on March 
8, 1863, and educated in Quincy schools 
and then at Musselmann College, he was a 
scholarly blacksmith. He married Marga- 
ret Eichmann in Cherry Bell, Missouri, on 
Dec. 20, 1887. They raised two sons and 




one daughter, who were still alive in 1980 
when I first started looking for information 
on their father. 

From 1891-93, with the help of a J. 
Lurvey, Bimson constructed the one and 
only shop that he occupied in Berthoud. 
For building materials, Bimson hauled the 
beautiful red-and-rose-colored stone from 
the foothills west of Berthoud. Today, the 
same stone is highly prized in the con- 
struction industry. Even at 106 years old, 
the shop remains in excellent condition 
and houses the Berthoud Historical Soci- 
ety Museum. 

Bimson started his business by shoe- 
ing horses and making plows for local 
farmers. He branched off into fashion- 
ing tools and wrought-iron candelabras, 
lamp bases and fancy grillwork. His work 
was displayed in many fine residences in 
the area and eventually could be ordered 



SteeL.CPM S30V/HRC 59-60 
Blade.. .4.75"/0.27" 
Overall. .9.75 
Handle.. .G-10 




.TRIDENTKNIVES.COM 
702 293 6769 



^ 



pi» v 



es 







We publish between 1 and 1 2 list per year with good old knives. Knife brands seen common in our 

list are Case, Remington, Bulldog Brand, Fightn' Rooster, Parker, Simmons, Shapleigh, antique german 

knives, antique english knives, antique ameriean knives, straight razors, Smith & Wesson, 

Weidmannsheil, Buck, Puma and so much morell 

Each list is at least 32 pages packed with good new and old knives. 

Our mailing list is $30.00 for a one year subscription. 

We will refund your $30.00 when you purchase $300.00. 

As long as you make at least a $ 1 00.00 purchase every 6 months, 

you will continue to receive our list. 

These list are VERY important to all collectors. They will provide you with a good market value on 

knife collectibles as well as the opportunity to purchase 

some really rare and hard to find cutlery pieces. 

We are also a Case distributor and carry the complete line of WR Case and Sons products. 
Send us a copy of your business license or letterhead for authorized dealer pricing. 

Our Bulldog Brand knives are hand made in Solingen, West Germany by master cutlers. 
Blades are individually hammer forged as well. 




(423) 894-5 1 02 

For Subscription or 

Free catalog Sample!! 



FEBRUARY 2006 



blademag.com 



BLADE / 61 




TRU GRIT INC 



The leading edge in high performance abrasives and knifemaking supplies. 

We offer the highest quality products, because we work with the highest 

caliber knifemakers. Home of the Hoggers & Gators ! 




ABRASIVES 

3M, Norton , Hermes, 
Klingspor, Standard 

Belts, Disc's, Sheets, Shop 
Rolls, Sponges, Flap wheels, 

Cartridge rolls, Scotchbrite. 

Custom size belts usually 

ship within 3 days. 



Ask about our special 
Quantity pricing ! 



BELT GRINDERS 

Burr King, Hardcore, 

Bader, Wilton, 
Kalamazoo & Multitool 

9" DISC GRINDER 




1/2 HP 110V 0-2500 
RPM REVERSABLE 
VARIABLE SPEED. 
ALSO AVAILABE IN 1/3 
HP SINGLE SPEED 



BALDOR BUFFERS 




BUFFING SUPPLIES 
STEEL 

ATS34, 440C, 416, 
BG42, S30V,5160,1075 

MOSIAC PIN 

DAMASCUS 

HANDLE MATERIAL 

STONES 

ETCHING SUPPLIES 
CASES 



760 E. Francis St. Unit N, Ontario, CA 91761 

(909)923-4116 * Fax (909) 923-9932 * Out of state-(800) 532-3336 

Visa - MasterCard - American Express - Discover 

Email us at - info@trugrit.com - Call or go online for a Catalog 

SHOP ONLINE AT: WWW.TRUGRIT.COM 



2006 

American Bladesmith Exposition 

January 20, 21 & 22 

At the Silver Legacy Hotel - Reno, Nevada 



^Vades^ 




Featuring all-forged blades by 
ABS Master and Journeyman Smiths 

Three Fabulous Days of World Class Knives 

Friday 12 PM - 4 PM 

Saturday 1 AM - 7 PM 

Sunday 10 AM -4 PM 

For show information call: 

Jay Hendrickson - 301-663-6923 

Johnny Perry - 864-592-0642 

For hotel reservations call: 

The Silver Legacy Hotel - 800-687-8733 • CODE: MBLADE 6 



m? 



through the Marshall Fields catalog, and 
in New Orleans and other stores in the 
South. One of Berthoud's residents at the 
time said Bimson was not a blacksmith 
but "an artist." A.G. had a reputation for 
making a weld that would hold where 
others' welds would fail. 

A good friend of mine who grew up in 
the Berthoud area gave me one of Bimson's 
knives in the late 1970s. My friend's father 
had given the knife to him many years be- 
fore. I was intrigued by the knife because 
of the stampings on the blade and guard, 
and the fact that as a long-time knife en- 
thusiast, I had never heard of Bimson. 

The knife is a large, heavy bowie type, 
with an 8-inch blade and 12 3/4-inch over- 
all length. The blade is handforged 7/32- 
inch thick and is 2 3/16-inch wide at the 
rear of the false edge. The false edge is 5 
1/8 inches long from the tip and is sharp- 
ened to make a formidable combat knife. 
The wood handle has a knob at the butt. 

The blade is deeply stamped A.G. 
BIMSON. The front of the guard is 
stamped A.G. BIMSON on one side and 
BERTHOUD, COLO, on the other, com- 
plete with the comma and periods. On the 
blade behind the name there is a large, 
half-inch-high "V" that, at the time (1980), 
I thought the owner of the knife had prob- 
ably stamped with a chisel. Since then I 
have acquired two more Bimson knives 
and examined three more. The chiseled-in 
"V" is on all of them. 

In early 1980, my wife Judy and I took 
a snowy trip to Berthoud to find out about 
the knife and the man who had made it. 

Herb Smith 

Through a good friend and knifemaker, 
Bob Russell, a partner in Colorado Cut- 
lery, also located in Berthoud, we met 
91-year-old Herb Smith. Herb had known 
Bimson for many years before A.G. died in 
1947 at the age of 83. Meanwhile, I had just 
obtained my second Bimson knife and had 
a renewed interest in learning more about 
the maker. 

Bob had told me that Herb owned a 
Bimson knife. When I asked to see it, 
Herb motioned me to a dining room table. 
I picked up the knife and was surprised to 
see the large "V" on the blade. Herb said 
all the knives were made for World War 
II, and the "V" was for "victory," the "V 
for Victory" being a hugely popular slogan 
during the war. 

I was all set for a complete history of 
the knife when he laughed and informed 
me that he had bought a box of junk at a 
farm sale some 10-15 years ago for a dollar 
or two, and the knife was in the box! He 
said that he did not know a whole lot about 
the making of the knives, but he knew they 



62 / BLADE 



blademag.com 



FEBRUARY 2006 




had to be of good steel and well tempered 
if Bimson made them. 

The knife is 12 1/8 inches long overall, 
again in a bowie style, with a 7 3/4-inch 
blade that is 1 5/8 inches wide near the 
guard. The handle is a very nicely figured 
walnut with "A.G. Bimson" stamped in the 
wood on both sides, the only one of the 
knives I have seen stamped on the handle. 
Herb's knife has "A.G. Bimson" stamped 
on the blade and also BERTHOUD, 
COLO, underneath Bimson's name. It also 



WILD BOAR BLADES 

Kopromed Deale Ko~ P romed U ' or: 

Wild Boar Blades 

Linder 

Okapi 

River Traders 

Thunder Mountain Forge Damascus 








Wild Boar Blades 

1701 Broadway #282 • Vancouver, WA 98663 
PH: 360-735-0570 • 888-476-4400 

www.wildboarblades.com 
info@wildboarblades.com 








IVORYWORKS LTD. 

GO NATURAL GO WITH THE BEST 

SPECIALIZING IN NATURAL KNIFE HANDLE MATERIAL 
MAMMOTH IVORIES STAG ANTLER 

PEARLS WOODS 

LOOK TO US TO: • Provide Quality Handle Material 
• Cut To High Standards • Provide Technical Help 

GO WITH THE BEST 

Banyan Bay Ivoryworks Ltd. 

7836 Oberlin Road, Elyria, OH 44035 

1-888-863-0265 

www.ivoryworksltd.com 

wdwrksltd@centurytel.net 



FEBRUARY 2006 



blademag.com 



BLADE / 63 



TRCM 



LV.I I 



CIABATTA 



Looking somewhat like a much smaller 

version of The Alamo, A.G. Bimson's 

114-year-old knife shop today houses the 

Berthoud Historical Society Museum in 

Berthoud, Colorado. (Clyncke photo) 



- S 

S5? 





is stamped on the guard with the name 
and town, as all the Bimson knives are. 

Two of the blades — including the 
one my friend gave me — do not have the 
town stamped under the maker's name, 
about the only variance I see. The other 
knives could have been stamped on the 
handles and the stamps wore off over 
time, but even under a good magnifying 
glass I could find no evidence of such a 
stamping. 

Herb's knife has a slightly concave 
area at the bottom of the blade just before 
the mid point. At first I thought the area 
was worn into the blade by heavy use, 



but I have observed the same area on one 
other knife. I believe that Bimson ground 
it in on purpose for some reason, either 
artistic or because he thought it would 
make a more wicked cut. 

The Second Knife 

I obtained the second of my two Bimson 
knives from a friend who bought it at an 
estate auction in the summer of 1999. He 
knew I had a Bimson knife and brought 
it over for me to add to my collection of 
one. It is also a bowie type but has a 6 
3/4-inch spear-point blade that has a non- 
sharpened false edge only 2 inches long. 



All but one of the 

Bimson knives the 

author has seen 

sports a guard with 

the maker's marks. 

(Clyncke photo) 



MSRP$250 

Revolutionary New Patented 
Mechanism 

Pin Lock Ultra Safety 

Superior Coil Spring Action 

(562) 903-0678 
www. p rotech knives.com 




64 / BLADE 



blademag.com FEBRUARY 2006 



Again, the blade and guard are stamped. 

However, under the name on the blade 
only the BERTH of Berthoud is discern- 
ible, with the "T" barely stamped and the 
"H" even less visible, as though the stamp 
were hit hastily toward the front only. The 
handle appears to be a deep, red cherry 
wood and, as with all the Bimson handles 
I have observed, is riveted on with copper 
rod. The spear-point blade is 5/16-inch 
thick, but the tang is a quarter-inch thick 
starting behind the guard. It is the only 
blade that appears to have been ground 
much after forging, as all the others are a 
uniform thickness from blade flat to hilt. 
All the guards are various thicknesses, 
from 1/16 to 1/4 inch. 

All the blades are very roughly made, 
with forging and grinding marks visible. 
Bimson obviously built all his blades for 
utilitarian purposes and not for looks, 
though his designs are very nicely done. 
I have been unable to find evidence that 
Bimson made sheaths for his knives, 
though some form of sheath would have 
been necessary to carry the large knives. 
Maybe he just left the sheaths up to the 
knives' recipients. 

Bimson had a second shop in the tour- 
ist town of Estes Park, which is the east 
entrance to Rocky Mountain National 
Park in Colorado. He worked at the shop 
for several summers, making his orna- 
mental iron for sale to tourists, but there 
is no indication that he made knives there. 
1 have documented eight existing knives, 
though I am sure there are more out there 
somewhere. (Editor's note: In the story, 
"A.G. Bimson: Last Of The Pioneer Black- 
smiths?" in the December 1992 BLADE®, 
Carl Bimson, Mr. Bimson's son, is quoted 
as saying that his father made no more 
than 50 knives.) 

More Bimson Knives 

Another friend of Bob Russell's has a 
Bimson knife that he bought many years 
ago in a shop in southern Arizona. It 
had no handle, so he had an elk-horn 
grip added and the guard replaced with 
a sterling-silver one. Several years later 
he had a gunsmith grind the blade to a 
nicer shape. As a knife enthusiast now, 
he realizes what a mistake it was to alter 
the rare knife. 

The Berthoud Historical Society Mu- 
seum also had a miniature Bimson bowie 
in its possession. Unfortunately, it was 
stolen several years ago. It was the only 
known example of a Bimson miniature. 

On my last trip to visit Herb Smith in 
November 1999, he gave me his knife to 
add to my collection, so I now have three 
of the V-for-Victory Colorado-made 
bowies. I will continue to look for more 
of the very rare Bimson pieces. 




ilONAL HUNTER 



,? Blade Steel IHl Ground; 
• Btade tengtimlSfS" 

. fll.J. TL.'.ll - I/O" 



• Overall Open Lengths'//' 
' Blade-Tech V-Hole 

• Precisian D-Nut "Torx" head blade pivot 

• Eccentric blade adjustment mechanism 

■ Ambidextrous tip-up / tip-down packet clip 
' liners w/ radius ramp liner lock 



'ifflf 



,.•*,:?>? 



$139 95 



« Choke of G- 70 or Carbon Fiber scales 
• Choice of Plain Edge or 25/75 Combo Edge 

DETECH 

TACTICAL & OUTDOOR ACCESSORIES 

WWW.BLADE-TECH.COM I 253.581.4347 



V ■ CALII 



CALIFORNIA'S LEADING CUTLERY STORE 



DRE ■ 



A Plaza Cutlery 
EXCLUSIVE! 



Plaza Cutlery Exclusive by Chris Reeve Knives "Doggy Knives"! Featuring the Large 
and Small Sebenza with silver contrast paw prints on the side of the knife! Large 
Sebenza is $449.95 and the Small Sebenza is $399.95! We usually have stock, 
but can run out, so order early for the holidays! 




Reminds 

you of your 

best friend each 

time you use 

your knife!! , 



Plaza Cutlery 

www.plazacutlery.com • E-mail: dan@plazacutlery.com 

3333 S. Bristol St., Suite 2060, Costa Mesa, CA 92626 

714-549-3932 Ordering Toll Free 866-827-5292 

Phone orders welcome and we accept all major credit cards! 



FEBRUARY 2006 



blademag.com 



BLADE / 65 



profile in steel 



al 

R 


, Aes 

DAI 


;th< 

BI 



By Les Robertson 



Sam Butler tests each blade 
that leaves his shop by chop- 
ping a bois d'arc fence post to 
test the knife's durability and 
edge retention. He cuts card- 
board to gauge edge sharpness. 
A sheep-horn handle, 4-inch 
drop-point blade of 5160, and a 
stainless guard and bolts high- 
light his "Drop Tine" hunter. 




66 / BLADE 



blademag.com FEBRUARY 2006 




ubbed the "Head 
Hunter," Sam's 
clip-point bowie 
sports a 10-inch 
blade of 5160 
carbon steel and a 
sheep-horn handle. 



Sam Butler has had an interest in 
making knives for as long as he 
can remember. He started down the 
knifemaking path, without even knowing 
it, some 15 years ago. It was then that he 
first met Brett Gatlin, another of today's 
bright young bladesmiths, and the two 
became friends. 



"For the most 
part, Sam's blade- 
to-handle ratios 
are right on." 

— the author 



As it often goes with friends, work 
and family responsibilities take you down 
different roads and in several directions. 



Giraffebone.com & Damasteel 



Bringing you the finest knifemaking products! 



Giraffe Bone 
Warthog Tusk 
Mammoth Ivory 
Kudu Horn 
Impala Horn 
Cape Buffalo Horn 
African Woods 



www.giraffebone.com 
Sandy & Jerry McClure 



V 



, % *»-804- ^ 



See us in 
Las Vegas 
Nov. 10-12 



Damascus 

5 Turn 

20 Turn 

Odin's Eye 

Rose 

Hakkapelita 

Random 



www.ssdamascus.com I 
Sandy McClure 




ge selection 
.. dmade and 
uction knives 



Get "The Point," a printed knife 

catalog presented by 

Arizona Custom Knives 



Julie Hyman | 5099 Medoras Ave. • Saint Augustine, FL 32080 sharptalk@bellsouth.net 




FEBRUARY 2006 



blademag.com 



BLADE / 67 



MffiMM @^s©a 



A 7-inch blade of 5160 carbon steel 
and an African blackwood handle 
top off Sam's "Peacemaker" bowie. 



CRAWFORD 
KNIVES ^ A 

w 



Collector Quality Folders 





The Big Bite Kasper 

Special Mammoth Tooth handle, Damascus blade 

and bolsters, file work, anodizing, and jewelling. 

Each knife is handmade one at a time using the very best of 

materials to give each customer a unique high quality masterpiece. 

Credit cards accepted. 

Crawford Knives 

205 N. Center Drive • West Memphis, AR 72301 

(870) 732-2452 • www.crawfordknives.com 



LONE STAR WHOLESALE 



GREAT PRICES 

DEALERS ONLY 806-356-9540 




Resale Certificate or FFL Required 
Lone Star Wholesale, PO BOX 587, 
Amarillo, TX 79105 FAX 806-359-1603. 
All FAX Correspondence, please include 
Tax info, and phone number. 



Brett and Sam were no different. That 
was until January 2004, when Sam spoke 
with a mutual friend. The friend men- 
tioned that he recently had seen Brett. 
When Sam inquired as to what Brett was 
doing, the answer put Sam back on the 
road again. The friend replied, "Brett's 
making custom knives." 

Sam contacted Brett and went to the 
monthly meeting for both new and sea- 
soned knifemakers held by Al Lawrence 
in DeQueen, Arkansas. Al runs River- 
side Machine Shop, which among other 
things is a knifemaking supply business. 
Lawrence is known to most in those parts 
and in the knife business as "Uncle Al." 
His monthly gatherings are always well 
attended. In March 2004, Sam went to 
one of the meetings and it was there that 
his knifemaking began in earnest. 

I met Sam in Little Rock, Arkansas, at 
this year's Arkansas Custom Knife Show. 
Together with Brett Gatlin, we had dinner 
the night before the show. That evening, 
Sam told me a lot about himself. 



"The knives' 

overall fit and 

finish belie the 

fact that he is a 

new knifemaker." 

— the author 



When I saw him the next morning 
during show set up, he was standing be- 
hind what I thought was a table of some- 
one else's knives. When he told me they 
were his I had to laugh, as up to that 
point I did not know he made knives. He 
had omitted that small detail during our 
dinner conversation the night before. 



Sam Butler 

Dept. BL2, 16450 MC 10 

Fouke, AR 71837 

870.653.6406 

Sambtl@swat.coop 



Specialties Fixed blades, espe- 
cially bowies, fighters and hunt- 
ers/skinners 

Steels 5160 and other carbon varieties 
Handle Materials Assorted woods, 
sheep horn and stag 
Guards Stainless steel, though he 
also has used nickel silver 
Miscellaneous Has been making 
knives for less than two years; sheaths 
custom made by Kenny Rowe 
List Price Ranges S250-S325 



68 / BLADE 



blademag.com 



FEBRUARY 2006 




Sam's "Night Prowler" features a 
buckeye-burl handle, a 4 3/4-inch 
blade of 5160, a nickel-silver guard 
and mosaic pins. 



I was struck by the quality of Sam's 
work, especially when taking into ac- 
count that he had been making knives 
for less than a year. His designs are at- 
tractive and functional at the same time, 
an aspect of knifemaking with which 



most new makers have difficulty. For in- 
stance, the handles of most new makers' 
knives have a tendency to be somewhat 
"blocky," or either a little too big or too 
small and out of proportion to the blade. 
For the most part, Sam's blade-to- 




"Sway-Back Skinner" is Sam's 
name for his sheep-horn fixed 
blade in 5160. 



Lansky 

Makes It Easy 

You've got a lot of equipment 
to get ready before the season 
starts. Don't forget to sharpen 
your knife properly. It's your 
most important and most used 
tool but is often over-looked. 
With Lansky® sharpeners proper 
knife care is as easy as 1, 2, 3. 



Controlled-Angle System 

Easy to use and produces 
professional results on every 
knife, every time. 



NEW — 

Folding Diamond Paddle 

Offered 

in a 

choice 

of five 

full surface 

diamond 

grits. Folds into 

comfort grip, 

non-slip handles. , 



NEW — Quick Fix 

Sharpens a blade on the 
tungsten -carbide head and 
polishes on the ceramic rods 
— with just a few strokes.. 




Look for Lansky" and Crock Stick" 
sharpeners at better sporting goods 
stores, log-on to our website, or ask 

us for a free catalog featuring our 
full line of knife and tool sharpeners. 

If LANSKY 

WBm. SHARPENERS 

"THE SHARPEST INVESTMENT YOU MAY EVER MAKE" ® 

Post Office Box 50830, Department BLA 

Henderson, Nevada 89016 USA 

www.lansky.com 



FEBRUARY 2006 



blademag.com 



BLADE / 69 




Mother 

of 
Pearl 
a? Company 



Pearl slabs including; 

white, gold, pink, black, brown & abcdone 

OTHER MATERIALS; 

Jig, Pick, Smooth & Stag Bone 
in a variety of colors & patterns: 
Mosaic Abalone Buffalo & 
Ram's Horn, Stingray Skins, 
Wallets & Belts. 



See Us At: 

Parker's Show 

Pigeon Forge, TN 

December 1-3 



Chesapeake Knife Show 

Timonium, MD 

December 11, 2005 



Catalog send $5.00 or download from our 
Web site to: 

Mother of Pearl Company 

P.O. Box 445, Franklin, JVC 28744 

Phone (828) 524-6842 

Fax (828) 369-7809 

www. knifehandles.com 

www.stingrayproducts.com 



C.O.D. 



Terms: 

Prepayment < 



MC/VISA 



^^SMa ®^®© D 



handle ratios are right on. The knives' 
overall fit and finish belie the fact that he 
is a new knifemaker. His blades have a 
nice satin finish and the guards are fitted 
very well to both the blade and handle. 
While there is always room for improve- 
ment, he shows a grasp for knifemaking 
that few makers with so little experience 
making knives possess. 

Sam credits most of his early success 
to his friend and mentor, Brett Gatlin. 
Other makers, such as Jerry Fisk, Roger 
Massey, Mike Williams and J.R. Cook, 
also have helped with his education. He 
acknowledges them all for giving him 
pointers at Uncle Al's monthly meetings. 
As Sam puts it, "They helped me more 
than they know by saving me from re- 
inventing the wheel." 

He makes several styles of knives, 
but his favorites are bowies and hunt- 
ers. He works primarily with 5160 car- 
bon steel but he can forge just about any 
steel his clients request. His choice for 
guard material is stainless steel. He has 
used nickel silver and brass for guards as 
well. For handle materials, Sam focuses 
on different woods, sheep horn and stag. 
He says that he is looking forward to us- 
ing ivory in the near future. 

Sam makes fixed blades only and 



does no embellishment on them, though 
he admits that he would like to attend a 
class on engraving. Each of his knives 
comes with a custom-made leather sheath 
by Kenny Rowe. 

Sam tests each blade that leaves his 
shop. He does so by chopping a bois d'arc 
(aka Osage orange) fencepost to gauge 
the knife's durability and edge retention. 
He cuts cardboard to test edge sharpness. 

To say that Sam's knives are afford- 
able is an understatement. His pricing 
policy rewards those who buy his knives 
early on. The pricing structure provides 
collectors with an exceptional value for 
the money. As the demand for and qual- 
ity of his work continue to increase, you 
can expect a commensurate price surge 
as well. His base prices by style are: 
bowie, $325; fighter, $275; and hunter/ 
skinner, $250. 

As with many makers, Sam makes 
knives part time. He lives in Fouke, Ar- 
kansas, and has a full-time job with the 
Air Force Space Command. He has a 
one-year delivery time and attends only 
one show a year — the Arkansas Custom 
Knife Show. 

Sam has a five-year-plan that in- 
cludes taking the necessary steps to get 
his journeyman smith rating from the 



ijjjjii^ iya )nal ill 




il 




• Genuine stag handles with nickel silver pins 

• 440C stainless steel carving knife double drawn and cryogenically treated to RcH 59-60, 
with nickel silver bolster 

• Matching 440C sturdy, uniquely styled carving fork with crown stag 

• Beautiful leather presentation case 

• Matching steak knives and cleaver available 

• Lifetime Warranty 



www.knivesofalaska.com 

800-572-0980 




70 / BLADE 



blademag.com 



FEBRUARY 2006 



American Bladesmith Society, and even- 
tually attaining his ABS master smith 
stamp. Since the bowie is his favorite 
knife style, he is looking forward to 
making as many different versions of it 
as he can. Ultimately, he said he would 
like to fashion bowies with damascus 
blades and fittings. Though Sam is the 
first to admit he has a long way to go, he 
must have goals! 

I have always found one of the best 
aspects of collecting handmade knives 
is the people involved. Sam is a perfect 
example. He is a down-to-earth guy who 
possesses not only the talent but also the 
drive necessary to make a fine knife. 
He has no illusions that he has much to 
learn. To that end he is quick to credit 
those who have helped him and points 
out that he would not be where he is to- 
day without their help and the support of 
the ABS. 

Sam is the quintessential "up-and- 
coming" maker. His knives are well 
made and provide an excellent value 
for the money. He is focused on what he 
wants to accomplish and will expend the 
effort necessary to attain his goals. 

If you like well-built forged blades at an 
affordable price, 1 highly recommend that 
you consider buying one of his knives. 




KNIFE . 
'EXPO 



m 



Pasadena Conference Center 

Lower Level Conference Bldg., 300 East Green Street, 

Pasadena, CA 

February 24, 25, 26, 2006 

CALIFORNIA'S LARGEST, OLDEST & 

FINEST KNIFE SHOW 

DOOR PRIZE • SPECIAL KNIFE by Richard Rogers 

FRIDAY 12:00 NOON - 7:00 PM • SATURDAY 10:00AM - 
6:00 PM • SUNDAY 10:00 AM - 4:00 PM 

For additional information visit our Web site scblades.com 
or call (818-368-71 10) 

CUSTOM KNIVES • ANTIQUE KNIVES • SWORDS RAZORS 

SUPPLIES & EQUIPMENT • PRIZE WINNING COLLECTIONS 

SEE THE LATEST IN FACTORY KNIVES 

CONTINUOUS RAFFLES and DEMONSTRATIONS 

DRAWING FOR $1000 SHOPPING SPREE WITH PAID ADMISSION 

KNIFE APPRAISALS BY PAUL BASCH 

KNIFE THROWING BY BOB KARP • KNIFE FORGING DEMONSTRATION BY RED ST. CYR 

ROPE CUTTING & KNIFE MAKING DEMONSTRATIONS 

WOOD CARVING BY CALIFORNIA WOOD CARVERS 

AMATEUR KNIFE MAKING CONTEST OPEN TO THE PUBLIC 

BUY • SELL • TRADE 



THE PERFECT ADDITION TO ANY COLLECTION ! 

DVD VOLUME #1 FEATURES: 



GREG LIGHTFOOT 
BRIAN LYTTLE 
KIRBY LAMBERT 



Shop Tours 
Lifestyles 



Interviews 
Current Models 



Special Bonus Feature: 

Intro by Neil Ostroff of True North Knives 



DvD contains over 120 minutes of footage! 

To order your copy visit: 
www.masterknifemakers.com or call: (306) 584-3555 





Suite *122 2505 I l : Avenue Reglna Saskatchewan SIP OK6 
sates&maiterknitemakers.com Teh (306} S84-3555 



FEBRUARY 2006 



blademag.com 



BLADE / 71 



Question & 

question & answer 

answer 

m _ _ _ By Joe Szilaski 

How to Drill Pearl biade* &««**«■ 
Without Chipping It 

Drilling mother-of-pearl can be extremely 
hazardous to your health and is tricky to do 



1 : 1 enjoyed reading "Drilling Holes Made 
Easier" by BLADE® field editor Wayne 
Goddard in the November BLADE, He 
did a good job covering issues involving 
the drilling of steel. 1 do not have much 
problem drilling steel but I do have a 
problem drilling mother-of-pearl. When 
I drill it, often the pearl will chip around 
the hole. 1 asked a few knifemakers if 
they had the same problem. They told 
me the chipping occurs when the pearl 
heats up as it is drilled. I have since tried 
to drill it in a small pan of water but the 
pearl continues to chip. Any suggestions? 
(Charlie Burdick, Saugerties, New York) 

There are a few things you need to be care- 
ful of when drilling mother-of-pearl. First 
is safety. When you drill or sand pearl, 
wear a dust mask or respirator. WARN- 
ING: The dust from mother-of-pearl is 
extremely hazardous to your health. Once 
you inhale the dust, your lungs will have it 
as a permanent resident. 



"When working 

with any natural 

pearl, there are 

no guarantees." 

— the author 



When working with any natural pearl, 
there are no guarantees. Unfortunately, that 
is the nature of the material. However, I do 
have a few suggestions that may help. 

To start, when buying mother-of-pearl, 
check it out carefully in good light. Make 

72 / BLADE 




When you drill or sand pearl, wear a dust mask or respirator to protect yourself from 
severe lung damage. Laurent Doussot's folder boasts a handsome carved mother-of- 
pearl handle. His address: Dept. BL2, 1008 rue Montarville, St.-Bruno, J3V 371 Quebec, 
Canada 450.441.3298 doussot@sympatico.ca. (SharpByCoop.com photo) 




It is paramount that you have complete control of your hammer, placing each blow 
where it needs to be. Start with a lighter hammer, heavy enough to move the steel but 
lightweight enough for you to maintain total control — as ABS master smith Jim Crow- 
ell demonstrates here. (Hinchman-Pianalto photo) 



blademag.com 



FEBRUARY 2006 



sure the piece does not have any deep 
cracks. 

Second, before you begin drilling holes 
in it, make sure the piece of pearl lays 
evenly flat on the drilling block. An uneven 
surface can chip or break when it is drilled. 

When grinding your pearl flat, use a 
slower-speed grinder if you have one. With 
a slower speed there will be less chance of 
heating up the pearl. If you do not have a 
slower grinder, take care not to keep the 
pearl on the belt too long and not to press 
too hard on it. Heating up the pearl will 
create microscopic cracks that the naked 
eye cannot detect. This will cause a prob- 
lem that may not show up until you begin 
drilling the pearl. 



"The dust from 
mother-of-pearl 
is extremely haz- 
ardous to your 

health." 
— the author 



Before you begin drilling, make sure 
your drill bit is sharp. When using a sharp 
drill bit, you will not need to apply as much 
pressure; less pressure means there is less 
chance to crack or chip the pearl. If you are 
not sure about how to sharpen your drill 
bits, you are better off buying a new bit for 
a few dollars instead of ruining a hundred- 
dollar piece of pearl. 

The method I use in drilling pearl for 
knife handles is quite simple — or at least 
it works for me. First, I set the depth of my 
drill press so that the drill-bit point sits on 
the top of my drill block. Most drill presses 
allow you to set the depth with a depth 
indicator, stop screw or stop rods. Properly 
setting the depth will ensure that the drill 
bit cannot penetrate any further than the top 
of the drill block. 

At this point, I begin to drill the hole, 
being careful not to press too hard. I will 
often back up the drill bit to clean the bit's 
fluting and eliminate any buildup of pearl 
dust that will cause friction and heat. If the 
pearl scale is more than about 3/32-inch 
thick, I squirt some water on the hole I am 
drilling. 

Once the drill has bottomed out, you 
will see only a tiny pinhole on the bottom 
of the pearl scale. At that point, turn the 
scale over and drill it from the opposite 
side. I have been using this method for a 
long time and, knock on wood, I cannot 
remember ever experiencing any chipping. 
(I probably just jinxed myself saying that.) 

Working with mother-of-pearl is unlike 
working with any other material, so you 



Lightfoot 
Knives 



TACTICAL DIVISION 




**+ CATCH 

DOG 

FRAME LOCK 4.5 BLADE 
$495.00 US 

NO PRINTED CATALOG 



phone:780/846-2812 
fax:780/846-2813 
RR 02 Kitscoty, AB 
New Sit ' Canada TOB 2P0 

www. liahtfootknives.com 




OSO GRANDE KNIFE & TOOL 

America's #1 Specialty Equipment Retailer 



Al_ MAR _____ BK'T 
J______l____" ___.IL, 



S£3COLUMBIA li 
_fl RIVER ;w " 



E 



BUCK ~** ' 



ft* COLO 



_f4_i ' ^ 
— ^ "IS" ~— . carco 



&.•*, 



PRODUCTS TECH S»WJU» 



—_, ^/_3»r-fe3!__S5 

;§£; spydorco _„„»„_., ""JiiF"* _CI_~ United 



SOG 




Vl( "t'UKINOX 



www. osograndeknives. com 

Info: 760-742-0385 Toll Free Orders: 1 -888-676-6050 



■__________■ 



• S V e 19*° 



'Handles With Care" 

from 

MASECRAFT 
SUPPLY COMPANY 



Pearl, Horn, Bone, Exotic Woods, Micarta, 

G-10's, Carbon Fiber, Celluloid, India Stag, 

ImiStag, Pearl Laminated Veneer Sheets, 

COLORPLY Laminated Wood Veneer, 

Imitation Pearl, Ivory Alternative, Recon Stone 

and a lot More. 



Call to order our catalog 

P.O. Box 423 BL 

254 Amity St., Meriden, CT 06450 

Phone: (203) 238-3049 

E-mail: masecraft@masecraftsupply.necoxmail.com 



FEBRUARY 2006 



blademag.com 



BLADE / 73 



uStSDrSEwj^^TeSrw 



Blade Show 



June 16, 17, 18, 2006 
In Atlanta's Cobb Galleria Centre 




SHOW OPENS 

Friday, June 16: 2pm - 7pm 
Sunday, June 

Show Highlights 



TO THE PUBLIC 

Saturday, June 17: 9am - 6pm 
18: 9am - 4pm 



• American Bladesmith Society 
Annual Convention 

• Special Knifemakers Guild Section 

• FREE "Super Seminars" 

• Blade Magazine's 2006 Knives of the Year™ 
and Handmade Awards™ 



• 2006 BLADE Magazine Cutlery Industry 
Hall-of-Fame Inductions 

• The Nation's Top Collections 

• Over 600 Knifemaker and Antique Tables 
and Manufacturers' Booths 

• All Major Knifemaking Suppliers 



Thanks to Knifemakers 

such as Duane Weikum with EDC Knives 

pictured below, all Attendees have a 

chance to win great knives in our 

Win-A-Blade Game. 




For more information on Duane, 
see "Where To Get Em." 



• 2006 Hotel Reservations • 

Renaissance Waverly Hotel 

Phone: (770) 953-4500 

Mention the Blade Show 

for Special Rate 

Book Early as rooms do sell out! 

• Travel Discounts • 

United Airlines is the official air carrier 
for the BLADE Show. 

Call 800-521-4041. 

Use Event Code 554SF. 

Avis is the official car rental service. 

The discount code is J099319. 

Call them at 800-331-1600 

For additional information contact 

2006 BLADE SHOW 

700 East State Street 
lola, Wl 54990-0001 

(877) 746-9757 

Fax: (715)445-4087 

E-mail: mary.lutz@fwpubs.com 

http://www.bladeshow.com 



question & 

question & ang/pr 



must take your time. Work it slow and you 
will get much further with one of nature's 
most beautiful materials. 

2: I am a beginning bladesmith with 
limited finances, and 1 need some help 
in selecting tongs and hammers to get 
started. I would appreciate any advice 
you can offer as far as what and where to 
buy. (name withheld by request) 

To get started, you need only a few different 
styles of hammers. Those most commonly 
used for bladesmithing are the cross pien 
hammer, sledge hammer, straight pien 
hammer and ball pien hammer. With these 
four you will be able to do almost anything 
you want in forging your blades. 



"When forging, 
keep good control of 
your hammer, plac- 
ing each blow where 
it needs to be." 
— the author 

However, the size of the hammer is also 
very important. When forging, keep good 
control of your hammer, placing each blow 
where it needs to be. My suggestion to you, 
or anyone just starting out, is to begin with 
a lighter hammer, heavy enough to move 
the steel but lightweight enough for you 
to maintain total control. I recommend 
beginning with a 2V4-3-pound hammer to 
forge your blade shape. To finish the blade, 
I would reduce the hammer's size to a 1 
1/2 pounder. If you are a large person you 
may be able to control a heavier hammer, 
but I would still suggest using the lighter 
hammer until you gain more experience. 

As far as tongs go, again, you need 
only a few different styles to get started. 
At first, get small- and medium-sized box- 
jaw tongs, a couple of different-sized bolt 
tongs, and a pair of V-bit tongs. For the "v" 
tongs, I would start with half- and three- 
quarter-inch models. Then, maybe add one 
pair of offset gooseneck tongs and you will 
be ready to go. 

These tools are available at any black- 
smith supply. A few include: 

•Tom Clark: He sells almost everything 
for bladesmithing and blacksmithing. Call 
him at 573.438.4725 or visit his website at 
www.ozarkschool.com; 

•Kayne and Son at the Blacksmith's 



Ed Wormser *»»-l«g""l»jt»if«'"t"s-"'n Jim Charnas 
847-757-9926 ^g BUY C \\ I CT I N $ J 08 " 302 " 5960 

Loveless Walker ^"N, Lake Moran 




The Raven Combat 

7" Blade 12 5/8" overall 530-V Re 59-60 
G-10 Gunner Grip™ Handles 
Blackhawk Sheath 
$299.00 

Combat Tested in Afghanistan 




Simonich Knives LLC 
Box 278 
Clancy, MT 59634 
(406) 933-9151 
www.simonichknives.com 
Mail: christine@simonichknives.com 



TEEL ADDICTION CUSTOM KNIVES 

Y SELL AND TRADE COME FEED YOUR ADDICTION 



FEATURING KNIVES FROM 

BOBBY BRANTON D.B. ERALEY 

WAITER BREND GRANT 4 GAVIN HAM 

LARRY CHEW TOM MAYO 

KIT CARSON MIKE OBENAUF 

LARRY DAVIDSON MIKE SNODY 

MIKE DRAPER J.L. WILLIAMS 




™ 55ESS5' DISC. VERT |$ 



www.steeladdictionknives.com DAVE STARK 909.731.3903 



Knives -Plus 

Retail cutlery and cutlery accessories since 1987 

EXCELLENT MAILORDER PRICES & SELECTION 

CALL FOR YOUR FREE CATALOG 

800-687-6202 



KNIVES PLUS® 

Retail cutlery and cutlery accessories since 1987 

2467 I 40 West, Amarillo,TX 79109 



www.knivesplus.com 



FEBRUARY 2006 



blademag.com 



BLADE / 75 




www.TheSwitchbladeAuction.Corn 




Italian Autos - French Autos -German Autos -American Autos 

If it's an Auto, you will find it here & for the best price on the internet! 

Also visitwww.Swinguard.Com & www.Flatblaster.Corn I 




Knife By Howard Hitchmough 




PARAGON SPORTS 

New York's Finest Sports Specialty Store 

867 Broadway at 18th Street, NYC 10003 (212) 255-8036 
Also Available Online at www.paragonsports.com 



www.knifeshows.com 

Give it a peek 
if it's knife shows you seek! 



question & 

ques Sh n lw§r r 



Depot: Call 828.667.8868 or 828.665.1988, 
or visit www.BlacksmithsDepot.com; 

•Riverside Machine Shop, aka 
"Uncle Al the Knifemaker's Pal": Call 
870.642.7643 or visit www.riversidema- 
chine.net; and; 



"I suggest starting 

with a 2 1/2-3- 
pound hammer to 
forge your blade 
shape." 
— the author 



•Mankel Blacksmith Shop: Call Ken 
Mankel at 616.874.6955. 

I hope this helps. Happy hammering! 

Send your questions for Wayne Goddard 
or Joe Szilaski to BLADE, P.O. Box 
789, Ooltewah, TN 37363-0789 
blademagazine@krause.com. Include an 
SASE with your full name and where you 
live for a personal response from Wayne, or 
e-mail him at wgoddard44@comcast.net. 
If you would rather e-mail your question(s) 
to Joe, his e-mail address is joe@szilaski. 
com. If you wish, BLADE will not print your 
name, city and state with your question. 

Blade 




You need only a few different styles of 
tongs to get you going. Jim Crowell uses 
a couple here to check the progress of 
his work. (Hinchman-Pianalto photo) 



76 / BLADE 



blademag.com 



FEBRUARY 2006 






„ „ w ., 706-896-2292 24 Hrs 

Call or Write: 

J.W. Denton 

102 N. Main St., Box 429 

Hiawassee, GA 

30546-0429 FAX 706-896-1212 




Associate Member 
Knifemakers Guild 



E-mail: jwdenton@alltel.net 



Randall TIbdt Krfves 




P.O. Box 1988 
Orlando, Florida 32802 

WRITE FOR 40-PAGE FULL COLOR CATALOG - PRICE $2.00 
INTL. MAILING - CATALOG US $5.00 http://www.randallknives.com 



Handmade 
by 

Gary Root 




MOONBLADES 
I CVSTOM 
KNIVES 



Bob Eggerling Damascus 

5" Blade 

Impala Horn Handle 

644 East 14th Street • Erie, PA 16503 
814-459-0196 



■iSM -S.W/11 'f„tUl 

■I'jifi &Jtfi i-'ja 



MIKEMOONEY 

480,987.3576 • Cell 480.244.7768 

1 9432 £. Cloud Road • Queen Creek, AZ 8524 2 

www.moonblade5.com ■ mike@moonblades.com 




Tru Hone 

Knife Sharpener 

The Tru Hone Knife 
Sharpener gives you a per- 
fectly sharpened knife in a 
fraction of the time 
required by old-fash- 
ioned methods. It sharpens both bevels of a knife 
blade simultaneously, resulting in equal bevels and 
precision sharpness in less than a minute. The 
Tru Hone can easily be adjusted to different angles 
allowing you to tailor your knives for any type of 
cutting operation. Its heavy duty stainless steel 
construction and 1/2 hp motor means you will get 
years of maintenance free knife sharpening. 

Tru Hone Corp. 

1721 NE 19th Ave. • Ocala, FL 34470 USA 
1-800-237-4663 

(352) 622-1213 • FAX (352) 622-9180 



A What do YOU want to k 

f] Learn from the masters in your 



| Ed Caffrey - ABS 

'I Dwayne Dusha 

y Chuck Burrows 

^1 David Broadwell - Sculpting h 

H Johnny Stout - Hollow Grinding fi 

\i Gene Osborn - Cable Damascus [! 







iss Instructional videos \) 
J, 

CCInstructionalVideos.com [i 
(817) 281-5424 )\ 



FEBRUARY 2006 blademag.com 



BLADE/ 77 



U.S. MARINE: LARRY KEEN- MASTER SERGEANT 

ONE OF THE FOUNDING MEMBERS OF TOPS FIELD TEAM 




U. S. MARINES TRUST TOPS 
...CAUSE THEY'RE HARD TO THE CORE" 



"Knife Making 
Sanding Belts" 

LOWEST PRICES 



Top Quality Cloth Belts A/0 



Size 

l"x30" 
l"x42" 
2" x 48" 
2" x 60" 
2"x72" 
4"x36" 
6" x 48" 



Any grit 

.700 ea. 

.700 ea. 
$1.15 ea. 
$1.40ea. 
$1.70 ea. 
$1.20 ea. 
$2.90 ea. 




* Belts (any-size) sheets, discs, rolls, etc. 

Available in A/O - sil-carbide, Zirconia, 
Cork, Scotch-brite material 

G.L. Pearce Abrasive Co. 

(Abrasive specialist) 

12771 Rt. 536 
Punxsutawney, PA 15767 

814-938-2379 for info & catalogs 

800-938-0021 purchases only 

VISA, MasterCard, C.O.D. 

shipping & handling $7.95 



For Dealers Only! 



For Dealers Only! 



For Dealers Only! 




Exclusive! 



**ft 




*£V 



Available only at 

National Knife 

Distributors. Inc. 



The Phantom Reflex, with ils new touch force 
technology, offers the speed and dependabili- 
ty of an automatic knife In an assisted opening format. 
The patent pending design ot the newest Randall King's [olders 
makes rt one ol the most practical pocket knives on today's market. 
Has T-6 aluminum handles with a camntlauge anodization. the knife is very 
strong, yet light. Has an ATS 34 blade with a black oxide coating. From the lacti- 
cal arena to the olljce. the Phantom Retlex is engineered lor quality. 
ITE M # RKPRCAM B Retail S169.SS 



We Also Carry: 

^COLUMBIA 
•tRIVER lUi\ 



BUCK 



Smith & Wesson 

CfllO STEEL Ka- Bar 




LEATHERMAN' 



Automatic 
Knives 



•Courteous Operators 
•Quick Service 



Call Us Toll Free -Brand Names -Courteous Operators 

-j _Qr\f\_AA~7_A f iA O "Dependable Sales Staff -Quick Service 

125 Depot St. Forest City, NC 28043 Telephone 828-245-4321 Fax 828-245-5121 
E-Mail us at nkdi@nkdi.com or Visit our w 



'■MMiMii 



tddk 



a 



4941 Cardinal Trail 
Palm Harbor, FL 34683 
Phone: (727) 942-6420 

or (603) 943-1327 



e-mail: 
willyb@willyb.com 

Willy B. Ellis 

Knifemaker 




Awards 
Artistry 

Specializing In: 
Hand Carved Ivory 
Antler and Horn 
Exotic Woods 
File Works 
Stone Settings 
Handmade Sheaths 
Scrimshandering 



78 /BLADE 



blademag.com FEBRUARY 2006 



"(_/ f ***** BU f ***** BUY 

OLD GERBER, LOVELESS, ANTIQUE, CUSTOM KNIVES 

SELL SLLL™ SLLL 

JAPANESE GENUINE SWORDS 
from SEKI , Capital of Japanese Sword 




SETO 



CUTLERY JAPAN 



NO. 674, INAGUCHI-CHO, SEKI-CITY, GIFU-PREF, 501-3932 JAPAN. 
TEL 81-575-22-8892 FAX 81-575-24-1895 
COQnOR&NT E-mail: sunny@setocut.co.jp http://www.setocut.co.jp/ 



www.SouthwestBlades.com 
877-844-4739 




Aleathesmah 



GERBER 

BUKER ^Spyclerco 

COLO S7EH 



Discount code: "blademag" for 10% off your order 



RIVERSIDE MACHINE 

UNCLE AL 
THE KNIFEMAKER'S PAL! 

Everything for 
Knife Making! 

201 W. Stillwell 
DeQueen, AR 71832 

(870) 642-7643 

FAX (870) 642-4023 

E-MAIL: uncleal@ipa,net 

www.riversidemachine.net 



NEW! NEW! NEW ! NEW! 
SIMBAF£€( 

NECK LOCK / SLIDE LOCK 
with 3 advantages: 




+ for right and left handed users 
+ self adjusting lock 
+ closed blade is hold by springforce. 
Made in GERMANY 

www.simbatec.com 



15th Annual 

Greater Shenandoah Valley 

Knife Show 

Fri.-Sun., 
March 31st -April 2nd 

Rockingham Co. Fairgrounds 
Harrisonburg, VA 

For Show & Booth Info Contact 

Joey Foltz 

540-833-6500 
www.svkc.com 



THORINDOG FORGE 

Cass Harris 

Part-Time Maker 




P.O. Boxl47 

Bluemont, VA 20135 

540-554-8774 



www.tdogforge.com 



TOPS KNIVES 

COMBAT TESTED - BATTLE PROVEN 
IRAQ ■ AFGHANISTAN ■ BOSNIA 
LA. - CHICAGO ■ MIAMI 



" DART ™ 
DART-001 



RANGER SHORT-STOP "" 

(Combat ■ Backup) #RSS0J 

"'"fS'inu ^l^^hi. Hl 9 h Carbon 

^RESCUE m> A/,Vhc58 

„ TEAM " 9L 0/4 ■ 6 J/4" 



SRP 
$329.00 
+ SSH 

Blade Color - 
Tactical Black 

Handles - Black 
Linen Micarta® 

Steel - S30V Re BO 

Heat Treated by 

Paul Bos 

OIA - 12 3/4" 
Blade- 7.0" X (3iW 




#nSS0f-B/ade-31/8"XQW 




FEBRUARY 2006 blademag.com 



BLADE / 79 





Bill Moran School of Bladesmithing 


2 






Washington, Arkansas 




DATE 


CLASS 


INSTRUCTOR 


6 


Feb. 13-24 


Intro to Bladesmithing 


Robinson/Massey 




Feb. 27-Mar. 3 


Damascus 


Fitch 


C 


Mar. 27-Apr. 7 


Intro to Bladesmithing 


Dean/Flournoy 


Apr. 10-14 


Damascus 


Williams 


L 


Apr. 17-21 


Handles & Guards 


Cook 


A 


May 6 -7 


Spring Hammer-In 


Neely/Fisk/Williams 


S 


May 8-19 


Intro to Bladesmithing 


Neely/Gaston 


s 


Jun 26-M. 7 


Intro to Bladesmithing 


K. & H. Harvey 




Jul. 10-14 


Damascus 


Tim Foster 




M17-M28 


Intro to Bladesmithing 


Fuller/Crowell 


s 


Jul 31 -Aug. 4 


Handles & Guards 


Walker 


c 


Oct. 2-13 


Intro to Bladesmithing 


TBA 


H 


Oct. 16-20 


Damascus 


Dunn 


E 


Oct. 23-27 


Handles & Guards 


Anders 


D 
U 




Schedule subject to change 




L 


Contact Mr. Scotty Hayes, ABS School Director 


E 




903/838-4541, ext. 237 






Texarkana College — 


- 500 N. Robison Road — Texarkana, TX 75599 



GAS FORGE 

Shape Your Large Blades 
By Hot Forging 



NC 
Knifemaker 




Reaches Welding Temperature 





^frA NC 




I^l^l Lowboy 


^ 


kL- 


^^^ 


i ■■. 




FREE CATALOG 



R 



NC Tool Company Inc 

6133 Hunt Road 

Pleasant Garden, NC 27313 

1-800-446-6498 



TTOllt 



Custom Made Knives 



Measure of Quality 




George Trout 

P.O. Box 13 Cuba Ohio 45114 

Ph. 937-382-2331 

gandjtrout@msn.com 



BLADES KNIVES TOMAHAWKS 

Over 100 Blades In Stock.. .Same Day Shipping! 



Stoirtess and Carbon steel blades 
from Germany. Norway, Japan 
and rhs USA.. .plus custom knife 
kits, pommels, guards, Handle 
materiol and omer supplies. 




Craz 




Crow 



1-800-786-6210 

www.crazycrow.conn 

Dealer Inquir es Accepted 
BQ Box 847 D-32 

Pottsbora TX 75076 



TITANIUM 



6AL/4V and Commercially Pure Titanium, Sheet, 

Bar, Rod, Stainless Steel Fasteners; Carbon Fiber, 

G-10; Titanium Pocket Clip Blanks 



Specializing in hard to find knifemaking materials 



■ Full line of Tactical Knife-making Supplies 

■ 6 Lobe Stainless Steel Fasteners 

■ Wholesale Prices on Carbon Fiber 

■ G-10 Available in Colors 

■ Rings 

See Our New Specials Page 
on www.halperntitanium.com 

Call: 888-283-8627 
Fax: 413-289-2372 

Web site: http://www.halperntitanium.com 
E-Mail Address: info@halperntitanium.com 



HALPERN TITANIUM, INC 

pal P.O. Box 214, Three Rivers, MA 01080 IS 



Heirloom Quality Custom 
Knives By... 



Michael O'Machearley 

129 Lawnview Drive ' , 
Wilmington, OH 4517 



ATS-34 




937-382-7569 



"Featured lit Blade Magazine" 
— -"/ ' August, 2003 - "Spec Sheet" 

When It Alt tomes Down To "A Sharp Edge" 



www.blacksmithsdepot.com 



World's Finest Blacksmithing 

Tools and Equipment 

Best Prices 

Sold By Experienced Blacksmiths 

NEW!! Peddinghaus 2 

Fly Press Horn Anvils 

■ [ Fl>^gcmasler T, 

Gas Forges 

m 






4 



Kayne and Son 

Custom Hardware, Inc. 

100 Daniel Ridge Road 

Candler, NC 28715 

(828) 667-8868 or 665-1988 

fax (828) 665-8303 



80 /BLADE 



blademag.com 



FEBRUARY 2006 



Knivesngear.com 



• Chris Reeve • Strider 
Ox Forge •Randall 
Made 




& many other high end blades 

727-776-3442 
knivesngear@tampabay.rr.com 





Fine Japanese Knives direct from Japan 

With 750 years of sword-making history and 

tradition, we offer the finest brand knives direct 

from Seki. Japan at the great saving prices. 

HATTORI, HIRO, SEKI-CUT, 
MCUSTA, SAJI & MORE 



www.JapaneseKnifeDirect.com 




okare knives 



"Silver Raven" 




Sean G'llare 

Xh7-fi95-26l« 

I'O Bui 574 

Fort Simpson, NT 

Canada, XOEONO 

sean@oltArcknives.cfl 

uwM.iilulrL'knivesAa 



Edmund Davidson 



The Integral- 

The Ultimate 

Hand Tool 




BG-42 Steel 



Loveless 
Design 

Straight 
Hunter 



S45 Virginia Are. 
, \A 24439 
Phone: 540-997-5651 
H-irif'.<><fllllfllff<f<iri<f.s<>ll.<-oui 



TOPS KNIVES 

BE READY: THE BEST 

PREPARATION FOR 

THE WORST SITUATION 



"NITE CHASER"' 



" SEA WOLFE " 




SRP 

$149.00 

+S&H 

Blade Length - 3 7/8" 
OIA Length - 8 W 
Hunter's Point 
Blade Thickness -(Wl 
Blade Color - Tactical Gray 
Handles ■ Black Linen Micarta® 
Steel - 154CM - Re 58 Cryo Treated 



' BAGHDAD " ATC-PANTERO " 

BULLET '" SRP 
#BAGB-03 
Handle - 
BluelBlackG-10 
OIA - 6 114" 
Blade - 3 112' 

x(3JT¥ 




(SPECIAL ASSAULT WEAPON) 

When There's No Time 
For A Second Chance 




SJ39.00 
+SSH 



#SAW-01 



Handle ■ Black G-10 

Steel ■ 1095 High 
Carbon Alloy Re 58 

OIA - 7 1/2" Blade - 3 1I2"X (3116 s ) 



#SAW-02 



#707C>0S V 
#1070 ry fc* 



\ 



" STEEL EAGLES " ™ 

\ #107C OIA - 13" 
* ,B/ade-7"X(Wj 



SRP #107C 
& 107D 
$199.00 
+S&H 



■ ■ 

s 



SRP 

$249.00 
+S&H 

| #1070 - OIA - 13" 
Blade - 7" x ( W ) 

#111A-OIA-ie" 
Blade- 11"xljl4") 
*Opposing Pitch Saw-Teeth 
Change Saw Style 
J Handles - Black Linen Micarta® 
I Steel ■ 1095 High Carbon Alloy Re 58 



...CAUSE THEY'RE HARD TO THE CORE! ""... 

A Tactical-OPS USA 

figh P. 0. Box 2544 Idaho Falls, ID 83403 
j©i PH: (208) 542-01 1 3 FAX: (208) 552-2945 
TOPS ...BORN IN THE USA... www.topsknives.com 



FEBRUARY 2006 



blademag.com 



BLADE/ 81 



"PICK YOUR PLAYGROUND" 



I 
I 
I 



I 



0000 Hrs. On Duty - Night Shift 

0100 Hrs. High Risk Entry 

0200 Hrs. SWATCallout 

0300 Hrs. Officer Needs Assist 

0400 Hrs. Chopper Insertion Rescue 

0500 Hrs. Street Fight 

0600 Hrs. Drug Boat Interdiction 

0700 Hrs. Emergency Response Team 

0800 Hrs. Armed Vehicle Patrol 



Anywhere 

Border Town, Pakistan 
Ramparts, Los Angeles 
Downtown Miami 
Mountains, Afghanistan 
Fallujah, Iraq 
Keywest, Florida 
Pipeline Probe, Iraq 
Downtown, Baghdad 



I 



...and the day has just begun... For GUYS that PLAY for KEEPS- 
TOPS KNIVES "ON DUTY" Around The Clock! 



-cEOIMSv. 




Finest Quality 
Superior Service 

Popular Blade Material 

440C, 440V, ATS-34, 154 CM, 

BG-42, 52100, D-2, 0-1, A-2, 1084, 

15N20, Nickel 200, Damascus. 
Guard Bolster & Liners 

304, 416, 410, Nickel Silver, Titanium, 

Brass, Copper and Aluminum. 
Handle Material 

Colored G-10, Carbon Fiber, Colored 

Phenolics, Natural Woods, 

Dymondwood®, Horn, Bone and 

Reconstructed Stone. 
Pocket Knife Supplies 

Steel Balls, Washers, Thumbbobs, 6 

Spline and Hex Screws, Clips, Mokume, 

Mosaic Bolsters and Pivot Pins. 
Machinery 

Heat Treat Supplies, Tools, Handle Bolts, 

Polishing Supplies, Engraving Supplies, 

Abrasive Belts, Blades, Books & Videos. 

Catalogs $5.00 U.S.A. 
* $8.00 outside U.S.A. 

SHEFFIELD KNIFEMAKERS 
SUPPLY INC. 

P.O. Box 741 107, Orange City, FL 32774-1 107 

Phone: 386-775-6453 • Fax: 386-774-5754 

Web: http://www.sheffieldsupply.com 

E-mail: sheffsup@totcon.com 



CUSTOM KNIVES 



624 Kings Highway North 
Rochester, NY 14617 

585 544- 1 948 



HEAVY DUTY HUNTER 



dickfaustknives@mac.com www.knifeshows.com/faust 



No. 3 Five Inch 

M.S. A. Co. Safety Hunting Knife 

2002 Reproduction 




BOWIE CORPORATION 

2036 13th Street, Menominee, Ml 49858 

www.bowiecorporation.com 

ph: 906.864.3922 • fax: 906.864.3924 

Toll Free: 877-622-2397 



FREE KNIFE CATALOG 



Cera-Titan Blade 




To place an order or request a FREE catalog 
of knives, call toll-free: 800.992.6537x18 
or write to: Boker USA.1550 Balsam St. 
Lakewood, CO 80214-5917 



1 88 Zeta 
V $97.95 



The Art of Lonewolf 




Line Buster 

by 

Lonewolf 

7" Damascus 

Blade 
Stag Handle 



Brochure: $1.00 
VISA & MC Accepted 



www.knivesbylonewolf.com 
E-mail: lonewolf@hemc.net 



J.A. Lonewolf & Sons 

481 Hwy. 105, Demorest, GA 30535 

Phone: 706-754-4660 FAX: 706-754-8470 




82 / BLADE 



blademag.com FEBRUARY 2006 



► Your Source for European Knives 




Puma ■ Bbker ■ Dovo ■ Eickhorn 
Fallkniven ■ Helle ■ Marttiini 
EKA ■ Opinel ■ Laguiole 
Wenger ■ Victorinox 
and many others... 



www.TOOLSHOP.de 




• IMMEDIATE PAYMENT FOR KNIVES 

• No Collection Too Small Or large 

• CUSTOM/ANTIQUE/COMMEMORATIVES 

• A Fair And Reputable Dealer For Over 25 Years 



^■\ 



Blue Ridge Knives 



X^v 



166 Adwolfe Rd. • Dept BL • Marion, VA 24354 

Phone 276-783-6143 • Fax 276-783-9298 

www.blueridgeknives.net 




SKIFF! BLADES 



Fine Knives 
Handcrafted in the 
Foothills of the 
Adirondacks 





P.O. Box 537 

Broadalbin, NY 12025 

(518)883-4875 

skiffmadeblades@hotmail.com 

www.skiffmadeblades.com 



Cove Cutlery Ltd. 

Fine Custom and 
Production Knives 



A 

A 




15,000 

products to 

choose from on 

our Web site. 

Cove Cutlery Ltd. 

USRte 1 (Jet. 216) 
Charlestown, RI 401-322-1311 



www.covecutlery.com 




"We wrote the book on 
knives-well, actually several." 

ONLINE BOOKSTORE. 



www.blademag.com 




April '06 
May '06 
June '06 
July '06 



Dec. 14, 2005 
Jan. 18, 2006 
Feb. 15, 2006 
Mar. 15, 2006 



Magazine 

700 E. State St. 

lola, Wl 54990-0001 

1 -800-272-5233 ext. 642 

FAX (715) 445-4087 



TOPS KNIVES 

NOW ... CAUSE 

THERE AIN'T 
NO TOMORROW 



" CQT-M/AJ /"™#oi 

OIA- 6 314' 
Blade - 3" X ( 3/16" 
Color - Tactical Gray 



SRP yc;. 

$79.00 f „<5 
+SS.H 




FEBRUARY 2006 blademag.com 



BLADE / 83 



Blade 

THE WORLD'S #1 KNIFE PUBLICATION ■ 

MAGAZINE CLASSIFIED 

HEADINGS AVAILABLE 

CLASSIFIED ADS 

Only 60 t per word 

Minimum charge is $9.00 per ad. 

800-942-0673 
CLASSIFIED FREQUENCY DISCOUNT 



(Consecutive Issues Only Of The Same Ad.) 
1-2 Issues No Discount; 3-6 Issues 15%; 7-12 Issues 20% 

6135 Grohmann 

6140 Heimerdinger Cutlery Co. 

6150 Henry Sears 1865 

6175 John Primble, Belknap 

6200 Klaas, Robert 

6210 Lackawanna Cutlery Co. 

6225 Marble Arms & Manf Co. 

6235 Napanoch Knife Co. 

6254 Ontario Knife Co. 

6262 Pal Cutlery Co. 

6282 Russell Barlows 

6300 Utica 

6310 Wade & Butcher 



ANTIQUE FACTORY KNIVES 

6010 American Knife Co. 

6020 Baldwin Cutlery Co. 

6025 Belknap Hardware Co. 

6030 Bertram (C) Cutlery Co 

6035 Boker Germany 

6040 Boker USA 

6045 Bruckman (E) Cutlery 

6050 Bruckmann, Solingen 

6055 Burkinshaw Knife Co. 

6060 Camillus 

6065 Canton Cutlery Co. 

6070 Case Brothers 

6075 Cattaraugus 

6080 Central City Knife Co. 

6090 Christy Knife Co. 

6095 Colonial Cutlery Co. 

6100 Cripple Creek, USA 

6105 Diamond Edge 

6110 Eagle Pocket Knife Co. 

6120 Eye Brand Knives 

6125 George Wostenholm 

6130 Gerber Legendary 
Blade 



6325 Misc. Antique Factory 

Knives 
FACTORY BRANDS 

6340 Al Mar 

6380 Barteaux Machetes Inc. 

6390 Bear MGC 

6398 Benchmade 

6421 Blue Mountain 

Turquoise 
6424 Boker 
6448 Buck 



6466 Bulldog 

6476 C.A.S. Iberia Inc 

6480 Camillus 

6486 Case 

6492 Case Classics 

6510 Cold Steel 

6523 Columbia River 

Knife & Tool 

6530 Cripple Creek 

6580 Fairbairn-Sykes 

6586 Fight'n Rooster 

6614 Gerber 

6650 Henckels 

6660 IBCA/ABCA 

6700 Ka-Bar 

6766 Marble's 

6842 Puma 

6860 Queen 

6876 Remington 

6940 Smith & Wesson 

6944 Sog Specialty 

6952 Spyderco 

7000 Tops 

7040 Valley Forge 

7046 Victorinox 

7084 Winchester 

7090 Misc. Factory Brands 
KNIFE TYPES /PATTERNS 

7100 Advertising 

7126 Baseball Bat 

7132 Bayonets 

7138 Bolos 

7144 Boot 

7152 Bowies 

7158 Bowies (Antique) 

7180 Camp 

7232 Commemoratives / 

Limited Editions 



7290 Diving 
7322 Fighters 
7334 Folding 

7338 Folding (Multi-Blade) 
7344 Fruit 

7374 Hunting (Folders) 
7376 Hunting (Straight) 
7420 Machetes 
7450 Navy 
7460 Office 
7466 One-Hand 
7526 Razors 
7532 Rifleman's 
7540 Scout 
7546 Senator 
7576 Sog (Type) 
7602 Swords 
7622 Tool/Pliers 
7628 Toothpick 
7640 Trench 
7650 Utility 
7660 Wharncliffe 
7666 Whittler 
7674 Misc. Knife Types/ 
Patterns 

HANDMADES 

7718 Bartrug (Hugh) 

7778 Bose (Tony) 

7785 Boye (David) 

7792 Burke (Dan) 

7800 Centofante (Frank) 

7818 Cooper (John Nelson) 

7825 Corbit (Jerry) 

7888 Davis (Terry) 

7928 Emerson (Ernest) 

7958 Fisk (Jerry) 

7980 Fowler (Ed) 

8020 Gilbreath (Randall) 



8030 Goddard (Wayne) 

8128 Holder (D') 

8188 Hudson (Robbin) 

8348 Lile (Jimmy) 

8400 Loveless (Bob) 

8450 Moran (Bill) 

8708 Randall 

8788 Ruana (Rudy) 

8808 Scagel (William) 

8880 Shadley (Eugene) 

8900 Smith (J.D.) 

8968 Terzuola (Robert) 

9000 Tighe (Brian) 

9100 Walker (Michael) 

9150 Warenski (Buster) 

9170 Wile (Peter) 

9180 Yellowhorse (David) 

9224 Miscellaneous 

Handmade 
MILITARY 
9310 Civil War 
9365 Korean 
9405 Vietnam 
9432 WWI 
9445 WWII - German 
9450 WWII -Japanese 
9465 WWII - USA 
9470 WWII - Miscellaneous 
9475 Miscellaneous Military 
MISCELLANEOUS PRODUCTS/ 
SERVICES 

9680 Agency Wanted 
9685 Appraisal Services 
9690 Auction Services 
9700 Books / Magazines / 

Videos 
9705 Buy / Sell / Trade 



9710 Catalogs /Mail Order 

Lists 
9712 Cigar Cutters 

9715 Collectible 
Advertisements 

9720 Collections 

9730 Dealers Wanted 

9735 Design Services 

9738 Distr Wanted 

9740 Engraving 

9750 Factory Reps Wanted 

9770 Handle Materials 

9780 Heat Treating 

9790 Knife Boxes / Containers 

9800 Knife Cases / Displays 

9810 Knife Clubs /Societies 

9825 Knife Rolls 

9840 Knifemaking Equipment 

9850 Knifemaking Instruction 

9875 Knifemaking Supplies 

9890 Knife Shops 

9895 Knife Shows 

9900 Leather / Sheaths 

9915 Manufacturers Wanted 

9924 Memorabilia (Knife) 

9935 Multiple Brands For Sale 

9936 Multiple Brands Wanted 
9938 Oils & Lubricants 
9940 Original Catalogs 
9945 Repair (Knife) 

9965 Sales / Auctions 

9975 Scrimshaw 

9980 Services, Miscellaneous 

9985 Sharpening / 
Sharpeners 

9988 Show Cases 

9991 Steels 

9993 Tobacco Products 

9996 Miscellaneous Products 



SCAGEL (WILLIAM) 




BLADE 



A NEW concept in knife Hunting- Outdoors- Defense 
www.otherblade.com 



CASE BROTHERS 



BUYING KNIVES: Case, Randalls, custom handmade and out- 
of-production. Years in business. Confidentially assured. 
Sensitive to estates. Please call 817-645-6008 anytime day/ 
night or e-mail delong@digitex.net 



GROHMANN 



CANADA'S KNIFEZONE, premier online knife and sword 
store. 160 brands including Grohmann knives. 
www.knifezone.ca, 1-866-885-6433. 



ALMAR 



AL MAR Knives wanted by collector. 1 to 100. Also catalogs, 
price lists etc. Stu Shaw 772-285-3755. E-mail: 
stushaw@adelphia.net 



BUCK KNIVES on consignment. To sell or for list of knives to 
buy, call Larry Oden. 765-472-2323 wkday eves, or Sat. 
References available. 



OLDER CASE pocketknives for sale. XX, USA, 10 Dot and 
others. Clean outstanding knives with pretty handles. Please 
call or write for my list. Charlie Mattox, PO Box 1 565, Gallatin, 
TN 37066. 1-877-520-9192, voice mail pager. Mobile phone 
615-419-5669. Http://www.mattoxknife.com 

WANTED: CASE pocketknives especially 10 Dot and older. 
Check with Charlie before you sell. Call or write. Charlie 
Mattox, PO Box 1565, Gallatin, TN 37066. 1-877-520-9192, 
voice mail pager. Mobile phone 615-419-5669. 
Http://www.mattoxknife.com 



REMINGTON 



REMINGTON KNIVES: Bullets, Wildlife, commemoratives, 
anniversary issues all years. Product information and pricing. 
800-622-5120 daytime. 



TOPS KNIVES- Buy from Blade Place and save. Orders over 
$100 get free shipping (USA Only). Buy 2 knives and get 1 0% 
discount. Toll Free order line 888-356-4724 or order online 
www.bladeplace.com. Mention this ad to get your discount. 



SWORDS 



SUPERIOR SWORDS Indestructible. Simply The Best. 
bradyodom.com bradyodomswords@yahoo.com. Brady 
Odom Master Sword Maker 1-800-573-4005 28 



8400 




LOVELESS 


(BOB) 


LOVELESS KNIVES 

Cuthbert, GA 39840 


wanted: Gordon White, PO 
229-732-6982 anytime. 


Box 181, 


8450 




MORAN 


(BILL) 


MORAN KNIVES wanted by collector. Bob 415-768-4821. 


8788 




RUANA ( 


3UDY) 



RUANA KNIVES-WANTED By long time collector. New knives 
or old knives with "M" stamp, small knife stamp or signature. 
No collection to small. Any condition. Call or write-Vincent 
Roberts, 300 Marshall LN SE, Cleveland, TN. 37323-(423- 
559-5168). or Email:Hillbillenigma@earthlink.net 



SCAGEL KNIVES and axes wanted: Gordon White, PO Box 
181, Cuthbert, GA 39840. 229-732-6982 anytime. 



9224 MISCELLANEOUS HANDMADE 



I AM looking to purchase any Bagwell knives, which were 
displayed at his table at the 1981 New York Custom Knife 
Show. Contact Dominique Beaucant, 2592 50th St, 
Woodside, NY11377. 

WANTED: SCAGEL, R.H. Ruana, Randall, Loveless, Morseth, 
Remington, and Marbles knives and axes. Any Heiser knife or 
axe sheaths. 229-732-6982, anytime. Gordon White, Box 
181, Cuthbert, GA 39840. 



BUY, SELL, TRADE 



84 /BLADE 



ANVILS. WWW.OLDWORLDANVILLES.COM 

FOR SALE: Antlers (deer, elk, moose), buckskins, tanned 
furs, etc. Over 150,000 items. Complete Internet catalog 
(pictures), http://www.hideandfur.com 

LEE'S CUTLERY knives for work, sport, pleasure & collecting. 
For a wide variety of knives, check out www.leescutlery.com 

WANTED: ANY condition handmade knives; Randall, 
Scagel, Ruana, F.S. Richtig, Morseth, Bone, Cooper, 
Loveless, Moran, Lile, etc. Also military knives and 
pocketknives, watches. Send description and price to: 
Angelo Solino, 6 Wesley Court N, Huntington, NY 11743. 
631-423-1729. 



CATALOGS/ MAIL ORDER 
LISTS 



DISCOUNTS UP to 55% on Case, Columbia River, Chris 
Reeve, Buck, Puma, Lone Wolf, Smith and Wesson, Gerber, 
Boker, Benchmade, Spyderco, Queen Schatt & Morgan, 
Kershaw and many more. Free catalog. Sooner State Knives, 
PO Box 67, Konawa, OK 74849. 580-925-3708 VISA/MC. 
ssknives@swbell.net or visit our web site 
www.soonerstateknives.com. 

GREEN RIVER Knives, ivory micarta, buffalo horn, oak, with 
sheaths. Brochure $1 York Mountain Enterprises, RD2 Box 
272B Dept. B, Pittsfield, PA 16340. 



blademag.com FEBRUARY 2006 



LIST OF over 600 automatic antique and modern knives. 
Including Case Zippers, Ka-Bar, Grizzly, Presto, Flylock, Case, 
Remington, Latama, Italian pick locks and many more 
brands. Send $5.00 refundable with first order. Skelton 
Enterprise, Jerry Skelton, 3795 Hwy. 188, Alamo, TN 38001. 
731-656-2443. Request list "S". 

OCCULT CATALOGS Spells, Charms, books, curio, and more! 
Get revenge! Send $5 to: Thorns Corner, PO Box 8028, 
Lewiston, ME 04243-8028. 

THROWING KNIFE catalog and instruction sheet sent free for 
SASE to: Tru-Balance Knife Co., PO Box 140555, Grand 
Rapids, Ml 49514. 

COLLECTOR KVIVES- Queen, Schatt & Morgan, Ka-Bar, 
Remington and Case. Send $2 for our catalog. S & S and 
Sons Cutlers, Po Box 501A Lomita, CA 90717 PH 310-326- 
3869 or www.snsandsonscutlers.com. 



9790 KNIFE BOXES/ CONTAINERS 



DISPLAY CASES: Oak, Walnut, wood, glass, standard or 
custom sizes. 28 page catalog. Send $1 . Woodland Products, 
61292 CR 7, Elkhart, IN 46517. 



FINE FOLDERS deserve protection. Ron Lake and Mike 
Walker send their folders with one of these soft goatskin, 
ultrasuede lined slips. Six sizes for pocket or belt. Arne 
Mason, 258 Wimer, Ashland, OR 97520. 541-482-2260, 
www.arnemason.com 



KNIFEMAKING SUPPLIES 



COLLECTIBLE 
ADVERTISEMENTS 



NEW: COLLECTABLE Knives of Finland by Les Ristinen. 176 
pages, 40 with color text from 1 649 to 2005. Antique catalog 
reprints $35 +$5 postage. Check or MO. Suomi Shop, 1 7533 
Co Hwy 38, Frazee, MN 56544 218-538-6633. 



HAND ENGRAVING by Reid Smith. Over 17 years of 
professional experience. Call 704-846-4242 or visit me at 
www.RDSengravers.com 



ill 



FOLDER SUPPLIES pivot pins, stainless and gold plated 
screws, titanium sheet. IBS Intl., R.B. Johnson, Box 11, 
Clearwater, MN 55320. 320-558-6128. 

http://www.customknives.comr.b.johnson/ 

NORDIC KNIFE making supplies. The most extensive catalog 
of Scandinavian knife making supplies on the web. Hand 
forged custom Damascus blades from some of the finest 
bladesmiths in Europe, factory blades, curly birch, sheaths, 
exotic woods, tools, kits, knife making tips and more. Come 
to Brisa knife making supply of Finland for all of your knife 
making needs, http://www.brisa.fi 

STEEL TANG Stamps: Mark your knives with your name, logo 
or design. Quality hand-cut hardened steel stamps made to 
your specifications. "If it's worth making, it's worth marking." 
Established 1898. Henry A. Evers, Corp. 72 Oxford St., 
Providence, Rl 02905. 800-553-8377. 



KNIFE SHOPS 



12 YEAR established knife business in North Carolina for 
sale. 919-460-0203 or email beckscutlery@mindspring.com 
Beck's Cutlery 



OIL HARDENING/ zone and clay tempering- all steels. Lee 
Oates, PO Box 1391, LaPorte, TX 77572-1391. For prices 
http://www.bearclawknives.com 281-587-6080. 



LEATHER/ SHEATHS 



CUSTOM LEATHER Knife Sheaths in your design or mine. 
Write or call: Robert Schrap, 7024 W. Wells St., Wauwatosa, 
Wl 53213. 414-771-6472 evenings or knifesheaths@aol.com 



SCRIMSHAW 



CUSTOM SCRIMSHAW by Juanita Rae Conover. Single or full 
color. Wildlife a specialty. Exceptional quality. Call for sample 
pictures and turn around information. PO Box 70442, 
Eugene, OR 97401, 541-747-1726 or 

juanitaraeconover@yahoo.com 

SCRIMSHAW, RELIEF carving, 3D carving, in business since 
1979, timbeersscrimshaw@hotmail.com 607-467-3961, 
http:// home.twcny.rr.com/sixth pacavalry/scrimshaw.htm 



9996 MISCELLANEOUS PRODUCTS 



ATTENTION CUT-OUT coin jewelry, coin buckles, inserts, bolo 
ties, chains, holders, tie-tacks, key chains, money clips, 
jewelry components. Great money maker. Catalog $1. 
Bernard Myles, 1605 S 7th St, Terre Haute, IN 47802. 812- 
232-4405. 

CUTTING EDGE Outdoor Goods- Knives, Multi-Tools, GPS, 
Binoculars, MORE! Name Brands. $2.95 Shipping! 
www.goldrushtradingpost.com 

NORTHWEST KNIVES, www.nwknives.com 800-611-8849, 
Antique, custom, military, factory, swords- we've got it all. 
Free Catalog! 



c 



ADVERTISERS' INDEX 



) 



A.G. Russell Knives, Inc 14 

Al Mar Knives 12 

American Bladesmith Society 80 

American Knife Making Supply 

115 

Arizona Custom Knives 67 

Arkansas Custom Knife Show 46 

Atlanta Cutlery 123 

B 

Banyan Bay Inc 63 

Beckwith's Blades 112 

Best Knives 106 

Blade Art 45 

Blade Show 2006 74 

Blade-Tech Ind 65 

Bladegallery.com 115 

Blue Ridge Knives 83, 111 

BokerUSA 9 

Bonds House Of Cutlery 106 

Bowie Corporation 82 

Bradley Cutlery 25 

Bradley's Blades 106 

Briar Custom Knives 51 

Burger Knives 102 

C 

C.A.S. Iberia 31,124 

Camillus Cutlery Co 109 

Carlson, Kelly 53 

Center Cross Video 77 

Chopra Deepak 54 

Chris Reeve Knives 27 

Clem &Co 35 

Collectibles Insurance Agency 48 

Collectors' Show, The 20 

Columbia River 17, 43 

Cove Cutlery 83 

Crawford, Pat 68 

Custom Knife Company 53 

Custom Shoppe, LLC 93 

D 
Davidson, Edmund 81 

The advertisers' index is provided 



Denton, JW 77 

Diamond Machining Technology 

E 

Elishewitz Custom Knives 53 

Ellis, David 120 

F 

Faust, Dick 82 

Finer Points 32,64 

Fowler, Ed 119 

Frost Cutlery 111 

G 

G.L. Pearce Abrasive Co 78 

Gary Levine Fine Knives 106 

George Trout 80 

Giraffebone.com 67 

GlendoCorp 49 

Grohmann Knives Ltd 97 

Guild, Don 119 

H 

Halpern Titanium 80 

Hanson, Don 112 

Hawkins, Rade 112 

Henry Evers Corp 97 

I 
Idaho Knife Works 81 

J 

Jantz Supply 52 

Joy Enterprises 40 

K 

Kayne Custom Hardware Inc 80 

Kellam Knives Co 51 

Kencrest/Hara 34, 57, 81 

Kershaw Knives 21, 33, 117 

Knife & Gun Finishing Supplies. ..56 

Knife Center Of The Internet 53 

Knife Mart 40,55,91,101 

Knifekits.com 39 

Knifeshows.com 76 

Knights Edge Ltd 3 

Knives Of Alaska 70, 114 

Knives Plus 75 



Lansky Sharpeners 69 

Legendaryknifemakers.com 75 

Lightfoot Knives 46, 73 

Lone Star Wholesale 68 

Lone Wolf Knives 45 

Lonewolf, J 82 

M 

Magnum USA 82 

Masecraft Supply 73 

Master Cutlery 36 

Master Knifemaker's 71 

Masters Of Defense Knife 23 

Meyerco 16 

Micheal O'Machearly 80 

Midwest Gun Exchange 15 

Moki Knife Company 36 

Mooney, Mike 77 

Moteng International Inc 28 

Mother Of Pearl Company 70 

N 

N.I.C.A 44 

National Knife Distributors 78 

NC Tool Company 80 

Nealy, Bud 92 

New Graham Knives 110 

Nordic Knives 93 

O 

O'Hare Knives 81 

Ontario Knife/Queen Cutlery. .7, 113 
Oso Grande Knife & Tool 73 

P 

Palacio Enterprises Inc 81 

Paragon Industries 92 

Paragon Sporting Goods 76 

Parkers' Knife Collector Serv 61 

Peters' Heat Treating Inc 105 

Pietro Rosa Due Buoi Snc 112 

Plaza Cutlery 65 

Pro Cut 5,118 

R 
Randall Made Knives 77 



Red Hill Corporation 101 

Reddick Enterprises 80 

Reno ABS Show 62 

Riverside Machine 79 

Root, Gary 77 

S 

Seto Cutlery 79 

Sheffield Knifemakers Sply In 82 

Shenandoah Valley Knife Coll 79 

Shepherd Hills Walnut 2 

Simbatec 79 

Simonich Knives, LLC 75 

Skiff Made Blades 83 

Smoky Mountain Knife Works In 

56 

Sog Specialty Knives Inc 29 

Solvang Knife Show 37 

Southern California Blades 71 

Southwest Blades 79 

Spyderco 8 

Steel Addiction Custom Knives. ...75 

Strider Knives 99 

Swinguard's Custom Knife Sale. ..76 

T 

Taylor Cutlery 113 

Texas Knife Outfitters 76 

Texas Knifemakers Supply 48 

Thorindog Forge 79 

Toolshop 83 

Tops 78,79,81,82,83 

Trident Knives 61 

Tru-Grit 62 

Tru-Hone Corporation 77 

True North Knives 8 

Twin Blades 20 

Two Guys Show Promotions 81 

U 
United Cutlery 11 

w 

Wild Boar Blades 63 

William Henry Knives 5 

Willy B. Customs 78 

Wilson Tactical Knives 114 



as a reader service. Occasional last-minute changes may result in ads appearing on pages other than those listed here. 
The publisher assumes no liability for omissions or errors. 



FEBRUARY 2006 blademag.com 



BLADE/ 85 




wHatsnewat'S il G W 



Folder Blades Can 
All Be Interchanged 

The Hunter's Edge Knife from Savage 
features four interchangeable 
blades — a drop point, gut hook, fillet 
and saw — and a hardwood handle. 

For more information contact Savage 
Sports Corp., attn: P. Iwanski, Dept. BL2, 
118 Mountain Rd., Suffield, CT 06078 
866.312.4120 www.savagearms.com. 




Van Dijk's Sword 
Stretches 38 Inches 

■ ichard van Dijk's 38-inch sword 
showcases a five-bar-damascus 
kblade, and an ebony hilt capped 
with silicon, bronze and damascus fittings. 

For more information contact Richard 
van Dijk, Dept. BL2, 76 Stepney Ave., 
RD2 Harwood, Dunedin, New Zealand 
0064.3.4780401 www.hoihoknives.com. 





Robo Power Assists 
In Opening Blade 

The Camillus Blaze, designed by 
Darrel Ralph, is a locking-liner 
folder with a RoboPower™ assisted- 
opening AUS-8 blade and a Zytel® handle. 
For more information contact Camil- 
lus, attn: J. Furgal, Dept. BL2, 54 Main St., 
Camillus, NY 13031 315.672.8111. 




Knife Comes With 
Steel/Grip Choices 

The Mikov Jaguar folding dagger 
comes with a choice of three damas- 
cus blade patterns and an amboyna- 
burl, cocobolo or snakewood handle. 

For more information contact Mikov, 
attn: R. Bican, Dept. BL2, 407 79 Mikulasov- 
ice 741, Czech Republic +420.412.394.160. 



Carved Gold And 
Pearl Define Knife 

A carved black-lip mother-of-pearl and 
gold handle highlight a Ken Steiger- 
walt Damasteel damascus folder. 
For more information contact Ken Stei- 
gerwalt, Dept. BL2, 507 Savagehill Rd., 
Orangeville, PA 17859 570.683.5156. 




Bowie Embellished 
With Golden Bugs 

Jerry Fisk builds a bowie with a 10- 
inch damascus blade, a silver-and-gold 
guard, and an ancient- walrus-ivory grip 
decorated with carved-gold ants and spiders. 
For more information contact Jerry Fisk, 
Dept. BL2, 10095 Hwy. 278 W, Nashville, 
AR 71852 870.845.4456. 




86 / BLADE 



blademag.com 



FEBRUARY 2006 



what s new 

what s new 

Case Folders Have 
Premium Materials 

Case's new locking-liner folders sport 
drop-point BG-42 blades, bone, 
amboyna-burl or mother-of-pearl 
handles and nickel-silver bolsters. 

For more information contact Case, 
attn: J. Sullivan, Dept. BL2, Owens Way, 
Bradford, PA 16701 814.368.4123. 




Celtic- Pattern Blade 
Has A Flame Edge 

Kelly Carlson's art dagger parades a 
9-inch, nitre-blued Andre Anders- 
son damascus blade in a Celtic- 
circle pattern with flame-pattern edges. 

For more information contact Kelly 
Carlson, Dept. BL2, 54 S. Holt Hill, Antrim, 
NH 03440 603.588.2765. 




Carved Damascus 
Enhances Art Knife 

I obert Weinstock's damascus folder 
features a carved blade, carved- 
kdamascus bolsters and a black-lip 
mother-of-pearl handle. 

For more information contact Robert 
Weinstock, Dept. BL2, POB 170028, San 
Francisco, CA 94117 415.731.5968. 





Tapper Cleanly Cuts 
Small-Size Threads 

The HMT-1 Tapper will tap to the center 
of a 1.75-inch blade or liner, and tap 
sizes range from 00-80 to 6-40. The 
shaft is a precision-ground, stainless steel rod. 
For more information contact Jeff 
Higgins, Dept. BL2, 124 Pine Meadow, 
Bennington, NH 03442 603.588.6167. 



Beech Wood Anchors 
A Full-Tang Hunter 

Wild Boar Blades introduces a 
full-tang 440C fixed blade with 
a beech wood handle. 
For more information contact Wild 
Boar Blades, attn: R. Simonson, Dept. 
BL2, 1701 Broadway, #282, Vancouver, 
WA 98663 888.476.4400. 




Bronze And Buffalo 
Horn Accent Knife 

John Pawlowski fashions a 440C fixed 
blade from copper, brass, nickel silver, 
buffalo horn and alternate ivory. 
For more information contact John 
Pawlowski, Dept. BL2, 4349 William 
Styron Sq. N, Newport News, VA 23606 
757.223.0613. 




FEBRUARY 2006 blademag.com 



BLADE / 87 




naker 

r showca. — 

sn 



rcase 




knifemaker sh 



"Knifemaker Showcase" spotlights the photographs of knives sent by any and all custom knifemakers to BLADE® lor filing in the Knifemakers Archive. The 

Knifemakers Archive is the most complete collection of knifemakers' knives and information in the world. If you are a custom knifemaker and have not sent 

us a photo (the better quality the photo, the better chance it has of getting in the magazine), write to: BLADE, c/o Krause Publications, 700 E. State, lola, 

Wl 54990 blademagazine@krause.com. Please include a close-up mug shot of yourself with your knife picture. 




Glenn Paul Smit 

"At a small gun show in Bel Air, Maryland, I met Norman 
Pepersack, who made miniature knives. Miniatures really 
piqued my interest in knifemaking," Glenn Smit relates. "I 
ordered a few miniatures from Terry Kranning, and with deliv- 
ery, he included a little bag of scrap materials labeled 'Minia- 
ture Knife Kit.'" Though Terry meant the bag as a joke, Smit 

built the kit knife. He has since 

included full-size knives in his 
offerings. The drop-point hunter 
(left) sports a 4 1/2-inch 440C 
blade, a brass guard, Pakkawood™ 
handle and mosaic pins. Smit's 
list price: $125. His address: 
Dept. BL2, 627 Cindy Ct„ Aber- 
deen, MD 21001 410.272.2959 
wolfsknives(< 







Darriel Caston 

"I used money I earned mowing 
lawns to buy Knives 1982 at a 
book store on Aviano Air Base in 
Italy," Darriel Caston relates. "The 
desire to design and create a fold- 
ing knife grew in me with every 
page I turned. The first folder I 
bought was a Jim Corrado piece — 
one of his signature knives called the Unicorn — and 
the form and shape of the knife were perfection to 
me." Corrado became Caston's first knifemaking 
mentor, followed by Timothy Wright, Dan Burke, 
Reese Bose and Richard Rogers. The folder (right) 
dons a 2 1/2-inch Bertie Rietveld dragonskin-damas- 
cus blade, titanium liners and a jade handle. Caston's 
list price: $750. His address: Dept. BL2, 3725 Duran 
Cir., Sacramento, CA 95821 916.359.0613. 




ymsn.com. 

Jimmie 
Buckner 

Jimmie Buckner spent 

four years in the U.S. Air 

Force and retired after 30 

years with the Georgia 

State Patrol. He is grateful to those who have helped him in 

knifemaking. "I had the privilege of meeting B.R. Hughes, 

who put me in touch with bladesmith Bill Bagwell. After 

knowing Bagwell for a year or so, he took me under his wing, and I became his 

student — probably his only one ever," Buckner says. "I also studied under Bill 

Moran and the late Don Hastings when hammer-ins were held in the Old Smith 

Shop in Washington, Arkansas." The bowie (above) features a 5160 blade and a 

silver-wire-inlaid maple handle. Buckner's list price: $1,075. His address: Dept. 

BL2, POB 162, Putney, GA 31782 229.436.4182. (Point Seven photo) 




88 / BLADE 



blademag.com 



FEBRUARY 2006 




Jay Fisher 

"Knifemaking has been 

good to me. I've been 

lucky, but I seldom work 

less than 12-hour days," 

Jay Fisher says. "I was 19 

years old and working as an 

industrial electrician when 

I heard about the 'secret of steel' — 

that you could heat it and cool it 

at different rates, dozens of times, 

deriving a piece of steel harder or 

softer." A full-time knifemaker 

since 1988, Fisher makes working 

knives, collector pieces, military 

knives and art knives. "I've made 

over a thousand gemstone-handle 

knives," he says. "Working with 

rock requires a different set of 

tools and can be frustrating, but the 

rewards are worth it. People think 

gemstone is fragile, but if done right, it will outlast blades. 

My inspiration comes from the countless knife and weapons 

makers throughout history who remain faceless except for the 

works they left behind." The "Raptor Karambit" (above) sports 

a 440C blade, engraved 304 stainless steel bolsters and a Red 

River jasper handle. Fisher's list price: $1,200. His address: 

Dept. BL2, 1405 Edwards, Clovis, NM 88101 505.763.2268 

www.jayfisher.com. 




Joseph Rosica 

"Since World War II, when I saw a bowie with a brass knuckle guard 
[knucks knife], I have been a knife collector," Joseph Rosica remarks. 
"That led to making knives for the past 43 years." Rosica keeps his knife 
prices between $150 and $195 apiece, depending on handle material 
and size. Most have ironwood handles and 440C blades that he mirror 
finishes. "Then I hand sew leather sheaths," Rosica notes. "I believe in 
first-class knives at reasonable prices, and I fix, 
free of charge, any problems that occur during 
normal use." Rosica's fixed 
blade (below) sports an iron- 
wood handle and a mirror- 
polished, fileworked 440C 
blade. Rosica's list price: 
$175. His address: Dept. BL2, 
539 N.E. 62nd St., Newport, 
OR 97365 541.574.0955. 




Martin Walker has been a diesel technician for 15 years 
and a part-time knifemaker for six years. "I've always liked 
knives and enjoy working with metal. One day I imagined 
a knife that I'd like to own and realized that nothing similar was available on the 
market," Walker relates. "That was all it took to get me going. Being a mechanic, 
I just had to tear into something, and I've been working on that ideal knife ever 
since." Walker fashions fixed blades, tactical folders and letter openers, but his 
favorite pattern remains his own "Barehead" folder. The Barehead folder (above) 
is available in an ATS-34 or spring-steel blade, a jigged-bone handle and a handle 
shield. Walker's list price: $100-$200, depending on materials. His address: Dept. 
BL2, 5750 Fayette Corner Dr., Whiteville, TN 38075 901.231.0032. 



FEBRUARY 2006 



blademag.com 



BLADE / 89 



:■••■■■■■.■■•• ,:mmmmm : -^ 



■•■-. ■■ 






■ 



knife .talk 

KniTe xalk 



When Jake Cook saw his good friend, Eldon 
Perkins, forging this knife, Jake seemed to know 
that it would be the ideal present for his dad. Eldon 
agreed and the deal was done. 



V 



\ 





By Eldon Perkins, with an 
introduction by Ed Fowler, 
BLADE® field editor 



&/?& a 



Making and delivering 
Jake Cook s final present 



WAS BITTERSWEET BUT IT 



was also a privilege and an honor 





An outdoors enthusiast, Jake Cook — obvi- 
ously pleased here after a particularly fruitful 
hunt — and the author hunted together often. 



fu 




A note from Ed Fowler: It is very 
likely that we all remember our first 
knife, the person who gave it to us and 
the pride of ownership and responsibil- 
ity we knew. Most likely when we think of 
a gift knife, we remember a grandfather, 
father or someone who took an interest 
in us and wanted us to know his feelings, 
or to simply say "thanks. " When we re- 
member the knife, other memories follow 
of lives and times shared. The following 
gift knife is one of love and tragedy of the 
kind every parent will understand. 

Eldon Perkins' wife, Amy, called me 
several years ago wanting to know if I 
would teach her husband how to make 
knives. Eldon had been working on his 
own for years and wanted to make the 
best high-endurance/performance hunt- 
ing knife he could. His family has been 
ranchers and hunters for generations. 

I invited Eldon and Amy to my Willow 
Bow Ranch, and Eldon and I spent three 
days making knives. Since then he has 
returned to the Willow Bow at least once 
a month for the past three years, simply 
wanting to watch and learn. He has done 
very well and the knives he makes are of 
exceptional quality. 

In the following account, Eldon tells 
of a gift knife he made that bridged gen- 
erations in another manner, when a true 
hero said "thanks" to the father who 
raised him. 

This past winter an old friend of 
mine, Jacob Cook, and I ran into 
each other in a local store. I had 
not seen him for a couple of years, so we 
talked for quite awhile. During the con- 
versation, he said that he understood that 
I was making knives. That was all it took 
and we talked knives a while longer. 
A young man, "Jake" had been a friend 



of mine throughout his childhood and into 
adulthood. Many hours we spent together 
along with my good friends, Jake's par- 
ents, Marlin and Cindy Cook. We pursued 
antelope, mule deer and elk. We enjoyed 
pack trips together and the entire outdoors 
and the thrills associated therein. 

As I talked with Jake in the store, he 
promised to come to my shop someday 
and further his knowledge of knives. I 
told him he was welcome anytime. We 
shook hands and went our separate ways. 



"I possessed 

the last gift he 

would ever give 

to his father." 

— the author 



The day Jake arrived at my shop, 1 
was glad to see him. Many people talk 
about visiting the shop but few actually 
show up. I was preparing for the 2005 
Oregon Knife Collectors Association 
Show and had several knives at differ- 
ent stages of completion, so it was a good 
day for my favorite topic. 

I happened to be forging a knife on my 
vintage 1930 Little Giant power hammer 
and my great-grandfather's 200-pound 
anvil. I explained the forging process to 
Jake. He got to witness the heat cycles 
and normalizing cycles, and began to re- 
alize that not all knives are born equal. 

Jake had grown into a man. He had 
many responsibilities and obligations 
and his time was limited, so he had to go. 



Robust !! 

Stainless Steel 
Cryogenic Heat Treat 



Leather 
Sheath 




For Those who 
Can't Afford 
A Cheap Knife 



UPS Shipping $8 +$2 Ea Add'l Knife 

Credit Cards/ M.O. to: 

Knife Mart, 596 W. 300 S. 

Heyburn, ID 83336 
Super 8 $q 331 3213 Thousands 

www.knitemart.com in Stock 
For Knives KNIFE 



FEBRUARY 2006 



blademag.com 



BLADE / 91 




Paragon heat treating 
furnaces for knife makers 

"I couldn't achieve the control I now 
enjoy had 1 not had a Paragon furnace," 
says Ed Fowler. "Owning a Paragon is 
extremely beneficial to blade smithing." 

The KM-24D shown above features 
the new Sentry digital controller and a 
larger, 'A" wide thermocouple. Ask 
about our optional gas injection flow 
meter. 

Interiors of our knife maker fur- 
naces: 14 W long KM-14D, 24" long 
KM-24D, and 36" long KM-36D. (All 
three models are 5 W wide x 4 'A" high 
A inside.) Free brochure available. 
(pWuuptl. Industries, Inc. 

£ 201 1 South Town East Blvd., 

A Mesquite, Texas 75149-1122 

800-876-4328 / 972-288-7557 
Toll Free Fax 888-222-6450 
www.paragonweb.com 
paragonind@worldnet.att.net 



Knife .talk 
tnrre talk 



As much as Jake 
enjoyed hunting, h 
seemed to equally 
savor working. When 
not in the outdoors 
. he worked in a body . 
shop with his dad 
I and with his grandfa- 
- trier on the ranch. He 
• also was a volunteer 
firefighterW^iSefioo 




I thanked him for his visit and he left. I 
continued with my work. 

Barely 20 minutes passed when he 
returned. He asked if he could buy the 
knife I had just forged as a gift for his 
father. I said of course, set it aside and 
marked his name on it. I could forge an- 
other one for the show. 



He reminded me that his father was 
left-handed in case that would make 
a difference in how I constructed the 
knife. We laughed as I kidded him that 
being left-handed was merely a birth de- 
fect and no fault of his dad's. We worked 
out the details of the transaction, shook 
hands and sealed the deal. 



The author flexes one of his blades 
to 90 degrees in Ed F.owler's~khife 
shop.-(FowleTphbto) 




92 / BLADE 



blademag.com 



FEBRUARY 2006 



Jake's visit reminded me of when he 
was a youth and all the good times we had 
together. He enjoyed working as much as 
hunting. His dad had a body shop and his 
grandfather owned a ranch. When not in 
the outdoors, Jake worked with his dad in 
the body shop and with his grandfather on 
the ranch. He also was a volunteer fire- 
fighter, a side job that he loved. 

His soul mate was Fawna Easman. 
This past March 25, he and Fawna became 
Mr. and Mrs. Jake Cook. They loved each 
other and were a perfect match. 

Deadly Inferno 

Three weeks after the Cooks' marriage, 
on April 18, I was notified that Jake had 
responded to a fire in an apartment build- 
ing in Evanston, Wyoming. He and an- 
other fireman, Robert Henderson, were 
informed that there were children inside 
the building. Jake and Robert entered the 
raging inferno to rescue the children. 
Upon their entry, an explosion known to 
firefighters as a backdraft erupted, leav- 
ing Jake and Robert dead. 



"Jake was 

never out of my 

mind as I finished 

the knife." 

— the author 



The news left a hole in my heart that 
will never heal. I knew my friend was 
gone forever. 

After his funeral, I stepped back into 
my shop knowing that I possessed the 
last gift he would ever give to his father 
in the form of a handforged knife. 

Jake was never out of my mind as I 
finished the knife. When I presented it 
to his father, I explained to him how the 
knife was born. It was an experience I 
will never forget. It was the most im- 
portant knife I have ever made. I will 
remember Jake Cook forever. He will al- 
ways be in my heart and soul. 

I would like to thank Marlin and Cin- 
dy Cook for allowing me time with Jake 
as a boy. I would also like to thank Ed 
Fowler for giving me the knowledge and 
the support to build the gift from a hero. 

A note from Ed Fowler: This drama is a 
tragedy, one that bridges time and loss. 
The hope here is that it brings a message 
of love and devotion to a father who 
raised a son who truly was a hero. 




Made in the USA 



Northwoods 
Knives 

Willow Leaf 



The new Willow Leaf by Northwoods Knife 
Co. is a product of The Custom Shoppe 
LLC of Gladstone, Mich., USA. This is our 
idea of everything a really useful hunter 
should be: a four-inch blade of high grade 
D2 steel with lots of curve for skinning and 
plenty of point to boot. The guard is of alu- 
minum and the handle beautiful cocobolo, 
curly maple, or a variety of Micarta and G10 
options. The sheath comes complete with a 
field-sized sharpening stone and is of the 
same first-class quality as all our sheaths. 
The perfect lightweight, practical package 
for your outdoor jaunts. 

906-789-1 420 



David G. Shirley and 
The Custom Shoppe, LLC 

7266 U.S. 2 and 41, Gladstone, Ml 49837 



WWW.NORDICKNIVES.COM 

Specializing in Custom & Randall Knives Since 1971 




Your Satisfaction is Guaranteed by our Return Policy 



Visit our Web Site, 

also featuring 

manufactured sport knives 

and kitchen cutlery 



1634-C6 Copenhagen Dr. 

Solvang, CA 93463 U.S.A. 

(805)688-3612 

or (800) 992-6574 (orders only) 



FEBRUARY 2006 



blademag.com 



BLADE / 93 




show calendar 



Note: Shows marked with an asterisk (*) have knives as the main focus. Events marked with two asterisks 
(**) are knifemaking seminars or symposiums, knife-throwing competitions, auctions, or other similar events. 
BLADE'S® "Show Calendar" also can be seen on BLADE'S Web site at www.blademag.com. 



NOVEMBER 



Nov. 28-Dec. 2 Exeter, CA Knifemaking 
Fundamentals, Sierra Forge & Fire Bladesmith- 
ing School. Contact Michael Vagnino, Dept. 
BL2, 130 E. Maple St., Exeter, CA 93221 
599.592.2080 www.ForgeAndFire.com.** 

Nov. 29-Dec. 3 Texarkana, TX Advanced 
Damascus, Bill Moran School Of Bladesmith- 
ing, Texarkana College. Contact Scotty Hayes, 
Texarkana College, 2500 N. Robison Rd., Texar- 
kana, TX 75503 903.838.4541.** 



DECEMBER 



Dec. 1-3 Pigeon Forge, TN Parkers' Greatest 
Knife Show on Earth #29, Grand Hotel Conven- 
tion Center. Contact PKCA, attn: B. Parker, 
Dept. BL2, 6715 Heritage Business Ct., Chat- 
tanooga, TN 37422 423.892.0448.* 

Dec. 3-4 Fort Worth, TX Great Western Show, 
Fort Worth Convention. Contact Great Western 
Shows, Inc., attn: G. Moore, Dept. BL2, 205 
North Market, Ste. 209, Brenham, TX 77833 
979.836.0303 info@greatwesternshow.com. 

Dec. 3-6 Exeter, CA Tip & Throat Sheaths class, 
Sierra Forge & Fire Bladesmithing School. 
Contact Michael Vagnino, Dept. BL2, 130 E. 
Maple St., Exeter, CA 93221 599.592.2080 
www.ForgeAndFire.com.** 

Dec. 10 Eugene, OR Oregon Mini Knife Show, 
Lane County Convention Center. Contact 
OKCA, POB 2091, Dept. BL2, Eugene, OR 
97402 541.484.5564 www.oregonknifeclub. 
org.* 

Dec. 6-17 Texarkana, TX Introduction to Blade- 
smithing, Bill Moran School Of Bladesmithing, 
Texarkana College. Contact Scotty Hayes, Texar- 
kana College, 2500 N. Robison Rd., Texarkana, 
TX 75503 903.838.4541.** 

Dec. 10-11 Waxahachie, TX 2 nd Annual Knife- 
makers' Guild Lone Star Cutting School & Clinic. 
Contact Warren Osborne 972.935.0899.** 

Dec. 11 Timonium, MD 19 th Annual Chesa- 
peake Knife Show, Holiday Inn. Contact Marty 
Merchant, Dept. BL2, POB 126, White Hall, MD 
21161 410.343.0380 www.knifeshows.com.* 



JANUARY '06 



Jan. 20-22 Reno, NV ABS Exposition, Silver 
Legacy Hotel. Contact Jay Hendrickson 
301.663.6923 or Johnny Perry 864.592.0642.* 

Jan. 27-29 Lakeland, FL 28 th Annual Gator 
Cutlery Club Show, Lakeland Center. Contact 
Dan Piergallini 813.754.3908 or 813.967.1471.* 



Jan. 28-29 St. Louis, MO Gateway Area Knife 
Club Show, Carpenters Hall. Contact Paul at 
314.241.6006 or Glenn at 636.300.1482.* 



FEBRUARY 



Feb. 4-5 Little Rock, AR 1 l m Annual Arkansas 
Custom Knife Show, Robinson Center Exhibit 
Hall. Contact David Etchieson 501.472.8446 
aka@alliancecable.net.* 

Feb. 9-12 Las Vegas, NV Shooting, Hunting, 
Outdoor Trade (SHOT) Show, Las Vegas Conven- 
tion Center. Open to the retail trade only. Call 
800.388.8104 e-mail SHOT@ttgonline.com. 

Feb. 10-12 Las Vegas, NV Las Vegas Custom 
Knifemaker Show, Mandalay Bay. Contact 
Wallace Beinfeld, Dept. BL2, POB 2197, 
Cathedral City, CA 92234 760.202.4489 fax 
760.202.4793 lvcks.com.* 

Feb. 18-19 Napa Valley, CA The Collec- 
tors' Show, Silverado Resort & Coun- 
try Club. Contact John Green 530.637.5387 
collectorsshow@foothill.net, www.collectors- 
show.com.* 

Feb. 24-26 New York, NY 17 th Annual East 
Coast Custom Knife Show, Crowne Plaza 
Hotel. Contact Steve D'Lack, Dept. BL2, POB 
313, Turners, MO 65765 417.866.6688 fax 
417.866.6693 hg_inc@hotmail.com, www.ecck- 
show.com.* 

Feb. 24-26 Dayton, OH NKCA Dayton, Ohio, 
Show, Hara Arena. Contact the NKCA office at 
423.875.6009. 

Feb. 24-26 Pasadena, CA Southern California 
Blades Knife Expo 2006, Pasadena Conference 
Center. Call 818.368.7110 for more information.* 

Feb. 25 Wyoming, MI 2 nd Annual West Michi- 
gan Edge Show, K of C Hall. Contact West 
Michigan Promotions Ltd., 278 W. Cleve- 
land St., Dept. BL2, Coopersville, MI 49404 
616.837.7194.* 

Feb. 25-26 Lewisburg, PA 1 8 m Annual Keystone 
Blade Association Show, Country Cupboard Inn. 
Contact Marilyn Kepner 570.584.4835 or Skip 
Fryling 570.387.4955.* 



MARCH 



March 10-12 Dalton, GA NKCA Northwest 
Georgia Knife Show, Northwest Georgia Trade 
& Convention Center. Contact the NKCA 
423.875.6009.* 

March 24-26 Janesville, WI 23 rd Annual 
Badger Knife Show, Holiday Inn Express Janes- 
ville Conference Center. Contact Bob Schrap, 



Dept. BL2, POB 511, Elm Grove, WI 53122 
414.479.9765badgerknifeclub@aol.com.* 



APRIL 



April 7-9 Bessemer, AL Jim Batson/Alabama 
Forge Council Bladesmithing Symposium and 
Knife Show, Tannehill State Park. Contact Jim 
Batson, Dept. BL2, 176 Brentwood, Madison, 
AL 35758 540.937.2318 jbbatson@knology. 
net.**/* 

April 8-9 Eugene, OR 31st Annual Oregon 
Knife Show, Lane County Convention Center. 
Contact the OKCA, POB 2091, Dept. BL2, 
Eugene, OR 97402 541.484.5564 www. 
oregonknifeclub.org.* 

April 8-9 Bethalto, IL Bunker Hill Knife 
Show, Knights of Columbus Hall. Contact Mike 
Pellegrin 618.667.6777 mikepell@apci.net.* 

April 21-23 Shepherdsville, KY NKCA 

Shepherdsville Spring Show, Paroquet Springs 
Conference Centre. Contact the NKCA 423.875- 
6009.* 

April 22-23 Coquitlam, B.C., Canada The 

Vancouver Knife Show, Coquitlam Sports 
Complex. Contact Bob Patrick 604.538.6214 
bob@knivesonnet.com.* 

April 28-30 Novi, MI Wolverine Knife Collec- 
tors Club Show, a joint show with Michigan 
Antique Arms Club, New Rock Financial Show- 
place. Contact Pat Donovan 586.786.5549 or 
Frank Meek 586.264.203 1 (evenings). 

April 28-30 Solvang, CA 22 nd Annual 
Solvang Custom Knife Show, Royal Scandina- 
vian Inn. Call Nordic Knives 805.688.3612 fax 
805.688.1635 www.nordicknives.com.* 



MAY 



May 7-8 Tucson, AZ Tucson 3 rd Annual Knife 
Show, Tucson Convention Center. Contact Mike 
Griffin, Dept. BL2, 5301 E. Sahuaro Dr., Scotts- 
dale, AZ 85254 480.948.2961, or call DonNorris 
520.744.2494 or Ted Vance 520.275.0798.* 



To ensure timely publication of your knife 
show in the "Show Calendar," BLADE® 
requests that you send all pertinent infor- 
mation concerning your show in written 
form — dates, locations, etc. — at least three 
months before the show takes place to 
Krause Publications, attn: J. Kertzman, 
700 E. State St., lola, WI 54945 (715) 445- 
2214 fax (715) 445-4087. BLADE depends 
on the shows themselves for prompt and 
accurate information. 



94 / BLADE 



blademag.com 



FEBRUARY 2006 




NEXT ISSUE 



where to 



where to get 'em 



get em 



UP-AND-COMING TACTICAL MAKERS 
Ryan Bailey, Dept. BL2, 4185 S. St. Rt. 605, 
Galena, OH 43021 740.965.9970 www.darrel- 
ralph.com; Todd Begg, Dept. BL2, 420 169 th 
St. S, Spanaway, WA 98387 253.531.2113 
todd@beggknives.com; D.B. Fraley, Dept. 
BL2, 1355 Fairbanks Ct., Dixon, CA 95620- 
2615 dbfknives.@aol.com; Tim Galyean, 
Dept. BL2, 11310 S. Macksburg, Canby, OR 
97013 503.799.7779 (cell) tjgalyean@hotmail. 
com; Kirby Lambert, Dept. BL2, 536 College 
Ave., Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada S4N 0X3 
306.737.2333 kirby@lambertknives.com; Chris 
Smith, c/o John W. Smith, Dept. BL2, 1322 Cow 
Branch, West Liberty, KY 41472 606.743.3599 
www.jwsmithknives.com; Dave Winch (address 
n/a) 

HOW MANY PASSES DOES IT TAKE? 
Diamond Machining Technology, attn: Christine 
Miller, Dept. BL2, 85 Hayes Memorial, Marlbor- 
ough, MA 01752 508.481.5944 www.dmtsharp. 
com; Fallkniven, attn: P. Hjortberger, Dept. BL2, 
POB 204, S-961 23 Boden, Sweden 46-921 544 
22 fax 46-921 544 33 www.fallkniven.com; R.J. 
Martin, Dept. BL2, 51 Bramblewood, Bridgewa- 
ter, MA 02324 860.347.1 161 www.rjmartinknives. 
com; A.G. Russell Knives, attn: D. Myers, Dept. 
BL2, 1920 N. 26 th , Lowell, AR 72745-8489 
800.255.9034 www.agrussell.com; Spyderco, 
attn: J. Laituri, Dept. BL2, 820 Spyderco Way, 
Golden, CO 80403 800.525.7770 www.spyderco. 
com, customerservice@spyderco.com 



CARBON STEELS 

Admiral Steel, attn: Terry Summers, Dept. 
BL2, 4152 W. 123 rd , Alsip, IL 60803-1869 
800.323.7055 www.admiralsteel.com; Reggie 
Barker, Dept. BL2, 603 S. Park, Sprmghill, LA 
71075 318.539.2958 www.reggiebarkerknives. 
com; Paul Bos, c/o Bos Heat Treating, Dept. 
BL2, 660 S. Lochsa, Post Falls, ID 83854 
208.262.0500 paulbos@buckknives.com; Wes 
Byrd, Dept. BL2, 189 Countryside, Evensville, 
TN 37332 423.775.3826 w.l.byrd@worldnet. 
att.net; Crucible Steel Service Center, attn: 
Scott Devanna, Arlington, TX 817.649.2800 
www.crucibleservice.com; Don Hanson III, 
Dept. BL2, POB 13, Success, MO 65570-0013 
573.674.3045 www.donhansonknives.com; 
Marble's, 420 Industrial Park, Dept. BL2, Glad- 
stone, MI 49837 906.428.3710 www.marblesout- 
doors.com; Mace Vitale, Dept. BL2, 925 Rt. 80, 
Guilford CT 06437 203.457.5591 

BLADEHANDMADEe AWARDS 
Thad Buchanan, Dept. BL2, 915 NW Peren- 
nial, Prineville, OR 97754 541.416.2556 
knives@crestviewcable.com; Joe Flournoy, 
Dept. BL2, 5750 Lisbon, El Dorado, AR 71730 
870.863.7208; Jack Levin, Dept. BL2, 7216 
Bay Pkwy., Brooklyn, NY 11204 718.232.8574; 
Steven Rapp, Dept. BL2, 7273 South 245 East, 
Midvale, UT 84047 801.567.9553; Richard 
Rogers, Dept. BL2, POB 769, Magdalena, NM 



87825 505.854.2567 rsrogersl@yahoo.com; 
Shane Taylor, Dept. BL2, 18 Broken Bow, Miles 
City, MT 59301 406.242.7175 taylorknives.com; 
Donald Vogt, Dept. BL2, 9007 Hogans Bend, 
Tampa, FL 33647 813.973.3245 vogtknives.@aol. 
com; Hans Weinmueller, Dept. BL2, 11624 
S John Harvey, Vail, AZ 85641 520.762.5482 
hanswmr.photosite.com/folders/gent_folders. 
html; Mike Williams, Dept. BL2, Rt. 4, POB 
64-1, Broken Bow, OK 74728 405.494.6326 
hforgge@pine-net.com 

JAPANESE KNIVES 

Benchmade USA, attn: Alex Whitaker, Dept. 
BL2, 300 Beavercreek Rd., Oregon City, OR 
97045 503.655.6004 www.benchmade.com; 
C.A.S./Hanwei, attn: P. Shipley, Dept. BL2, 
650 Industrial Blvd., Sale Creek, TN 37373 
423.332.4700 www.casiberia.com; Columbia 
River Knife & Tool, attn: D. Flagg, Dept. BL2, 
9720 SW Hillman, Suite 805, Wilsonville OR 
97070 503.685.5015 www.crkt.com; Magnum, 
c/o Boker USA, attn: C. Hoffman, Dept. 
BL2, 1550 Balsam St., Lakewood, CO 80215 
303.462.0662 fax 303.462.0668 www.bokerusa. 
com; Spyderco, attn: J. Laituri, Dept. BL2, 820 
Spyderco Way, Golden, CO 80403 800.525.7770 
www.spyderco.com 

BLAZ1N' A TRAIL TO BLADE SHOW WEST 
Paul Basch, Dept. BL2, 3091 A Yorkshire 
Cir., Springdale, AR 72764 479.751.2728 
paulbasch@hotmail.com; Todd Begg, Dept. BL2, 
420 169 St. S, Spanaway, WA98387 253.531.21 13 
www.beggknives.com; Thad Buchanan, 
Dept. BL2, 915 N.W Perennial, Prineville, OR 
97754 541.416.2556 knives@crestviewcable. 
com; Ed Caffrey, Dept. BL2, 2608 Central 
Ave. W, Great Falls, MT 59404 406.727.9102 
ed@caffreyknives.net; Jon Christensen, Dept. 
BL2, 7814 Spear Dr., Shepherd, MT 59079 
406.373.0253 jbchris@aol.com; Vince Evans, 
Dept. BL2, 35 Beaver Creek Rd., Cathlamet, 
WA 98612 360.795.0096 vevans@localnet.com; 
Frank Gamble, Dept. BL2, 3872 Dunbar PL, 
Fremont, CA 94536 510.797.7970; David Lang, 
Dept. BL2, 6153 Cummulus Cir., Kearns, UT 
84118 801.809.1241; Steven Rapp, Dept. BL2, 
7273 S. 245 E, Midvale, UT 84047 801.567.9553; 
Chuck Richards, Dept. BL2, 2889 Shields Ln., 
Fortuna, CA 95540 707.725.2526; Jeff Stover, 
Dept. BL2, Collectors' Gallery, Alpine Village, 
Torrance, CA 310.532.2216 edgedealer@aol. 
com; Ford Swauger, Dept. BL2, 1419 Colonial 
Rd., Roseburg, OR 97470 541.679.8861; Joe 
Szilaski, Dept. BL2, 29 Carroll Dr., Wappingers 
Falls, NY 12590 845.297.5397 www.szilaski. 
com; Michael Zscherny, Dept. BL2, 1840 Rock 
Island Dr., Ely, IA 52227 319.848.3629 

BLADE SHOW 2006 AD 

EDC Knives, attn: D. Weikum, Dept. BL2, 
5111 Telegraph Ave., #150, Oakland, CA 94609 
415.336.4234 www.edcknives.com 

Blade 



On Most Newsstands 
by Jan. 10 

Knifemakers To 
Watch in 2006 

Evolution of a 
Competition Knife 

Knife Mechanisms: 
All Are A Lock 

Factory Tactical 
Fixed Blades 

Art Deco Knives 

Swords: Are Two 

Hands Better 

Than One? 

Hammerin' Hot: 
Adam Des Rosier s 

Collector Interview: 
Gary Smith 



FEBRUARY 2006 



blademag.com 



[fcjfflffifeJ&asD®® 




The late Ralph Selvidio (right) built this reproduction of the Bare Moore bowie to 
the specifications of his knifemaking apprentice, Ron Lambert (opposite page). 
When the knife was commissioned in 1989, Ralph usually fashioned blades from O- 
1 tool steel, but Lambert talked him into a bowie with a 1/4-inch-thick 440 stainless 
steel blade. The knife stretches 13 1/2 inches overall and features a desert-iron- 
wood handle, nickel-silver fittings and engraving by Bill McHenry. 




Mentor 
Knifemaker 



The author offered 
to sweep and clean 
Ralph Selvidio's 
shop in exchange 
for watching him 
make knives 

By Ron Lambert 



I first met Ralph Selvidio, in 1989, at 
the Northwest Cutlery Collectors 
Association (NCCA) knife show in 
Marlborough, Massachusetts. I was a 
pocketknife collector, but my marginal 
interest in fixed blades compounded 
the minute I approached Ralph's table. 
He had designed and fashioned some of 
the most incredible fixed blades I had 
ever seen. 

In the course of our ensuing conver- 
sation, we found out that we lived 20 
minutes from each other in Rhode Is- 
land. When I told him that I had always 
wanted a handmade bowie, Ralph said, 
"I'll make you one for $300." (Ah, those 
were the days.) 

We discussed knives, in general, and 
I commissioned him to make a bowie for 
me, giving him a $100 deposit. 

Ralph usually fashioned blades from 
O-l tool steel, but I talked him into a 
bowie with a 1/4-inch-thick 440 stain- 
less steel blade. The knife stretches 13 
1/2 inches overall and features an 8 1/4- 
inch blade with a false edge, a desert- 
ironwood handle, nickel-silver fittings 



and a leather sheath. 

Ralph was busy at the time, so it took 
11 months to finish the piece, and then 
it was sent to Bill McHenry for engrav- 
ing. I admired Ralph's style and work- 
manship so much that, while waiting for 
the bowie, I bought a fighter knife he 
had already made. It sports an 8 7/8- 
inch, double-edged, ATS-34 blade, en- 
graved nickel-silver bolsters and a rose- 
wood handle. 

Ralph and I became fast friends. I 
made a deal with him — I would sweep 
and clean his shop every Saturday if 
he would allow me to watch him make 
knives. He said, "Forget cleaning the 
shop! If you're going to be here, you 
might as well learn [hands on] how to 
make a knife." We became even better 
friends. 

Before I met Ralph, he was a karate 
instructor. Frustrated that he could not 
find a particular style of knife pertain- 
ing to karate, he decided to make one. 
Ralph soon became a self-taught, full- 
time knifemaker. His knives are all one- 
of-a-kind, handmade pieces, and feature 



96 / BLADE 



blademag.com 



FEBRUARY 2006 




Under the tutelage of Ralph Selvidio, 
knifemaker Ron Lambert (shown) learned 
to build pieces such as this 0-1 fixed 
blade featuring an ebony handle and en- 
graved nickel-silver bolsters. Lambert's 
list price for a similar piece: $250. 



exotic-wood sheaths with skin overlays. 
Snakeskin was his favorite, and thus his 
trademark — "Rattler Brand." 

Initially, my handmade knives re- 
sembled Ralph's in one way or another. 
His one rule was, "There are no rules." 
My first knife under his tutelage was an 
O-l hunter with a 3 7/8-inch blade, an 
ebony handle and nickel-silver bolsters 
that I paid to have engraved. 

Over time, Ralph taught me how to 
develop and perfect my own knifemak- 
ing style. To date, I have built and sold 
approximately 80 knives. 

After I had apprenticed for about a 
year under Ralph, he switched to mak- 
ing folders. I talked him into making me 
his model No. 3 folder, which turned out 
to be the only slip joint he ever made. 
The knife showcases a 2 1/8-inch O- 
1 blade and engraved bronze handle. 
He also helped me make my first fold- 
er before I became too sick to work on 
knives in 1996. 

During and after recuperating from 
an illness, I lost interest in making 
knives. Ralph never gave up on 
me. Because of his con- 
stant encouragement 
and faith in me, 
1 have re- 



turned (albeit slowly) to knifemaking. 

Ralph's first shop was cold in the win- 
ter. The bucket of water used to quench 
blades during the grinding process was 
often frozen. I remember it being so cold 
a bottle of Super Glue™ froze. We placed 
it on a kerosene-burning stove to warm 
it and ended up practically asphyxiating 
ourselves. The entire shop looked like an 
FBI forensic lab filled with fumes. 

Ralph was not only a master crafts- 
man, but he was also an incredible art- 
ist creating singular designs. Toward the 
end of his career, he made high-end au- 
tomatic knives that commanded starting 
prices of $3,000 each. He was patient, 
generous with his time and put his own 
knifemaking aside to help me and other 
knifemakers, including George Dailey. 

On May 30, 2004, at the age of 47, 
Ralph lost a six-month battle with lung 
cancer. I can think of no better epitaph 
to Ralph than quoting his mother, Patri- 
cia Quaratella, who said, "His search for 
knowledge about things that interested 
him always amazed me. He was invari- 
ably himself and he was cool!" 




The only slip-joint folder Ralph Selvidio 
ever made, and his third folder overall 
(model No. 3), showcases a 2 1/8-inch 0-1 
blade and engraved bronze handle. 



CLASSIC DESIGNS 
FOR OVER 45 YEARS 



(give a §j.ji tftat XmsU a Jjfetime 




H Free Shipping 
_l on $50 



orders! 

Take the Hassle Out of the Holidays 
Let Us Ship Your Gifts For You! 

Seconds Sale! 50% Off! 
Call/Email To Order Or for a Free Info Pack 



GRDHHANH 



[SSMMS 



www.grohmannknives.com 



® 

TANG STAMPS 

E6H TANG HOLDER 




Finest hardened tool steel die 

stamps mark your tangs for 
instant, permanent identification. 
Logos, lettering, symbols, sizes to 
your specifications for hand, E6H 
Tang Holder, or press application. 
Evers... professional 
quality since 1898. 

FREE BROCHURES 



HENRY A. EVERS CORP, 

72 N. Oxford St., Providence, Rl 02905 
TOLL FREE: 1-800-55-EVERS 

Phone; 401-781-4767 Fax: 401-781-9581 



everstam p @ aol.com 

ORDER DIRECT FROM MANUFACTURER 



FEBRUARY 2006 



blademag.com 



BLADE / 97 




s SDecsheet 5heet 



By MSG Kim Breed 
5th Special Forces (retired) 



In the Chopping Mode 

TOPS' MT-21 chops, whacks and push cuts its way 
through a testing minefield 



The United Parcel Service man showed 
up with a box from Mike Fuller of 
TOPS Knives. Looks like Christmas 
was early this year. I laid out the knives and 
looked them over. The first one to jump out 
at me was the Mission Team 21.1 just like 
the way the blade is shaped. Not wasting 
any time, I ran it through a play session. 

Workin' It 

I grabbed my camera and the MT-21 and 
headed out the door to the garage. First 
on the cutting agenda: a heavy cardboard 
tube, the kind in which steel is shipped. 
1 chopped backward and up, forward and 
down, and finished with a frenzy. The MT- 
21 did not let me down. The weight of the 
knife makes chopping easy and the handle 
does not create any hot spots on the hand. 

Next, I grabbed some leftover half-inch 
plywood strips and chopped them up. The 
MT-2 1 felt solid as it bit deep into the lami- 
nated wood. Little chunks of it went flying! 
After a dozen or so whacks, the plywood 
was history. I did a visual check of the 
edge for chips or nicks but found none. The 



1 








HL 


I 

1 


^_ (y^ 






' " 







The author chopped backward and up, forward and down, and finished 
the cardboard tube with a frenzy. The knife's weight makes chopping 
easy and the handle does not create any hot spots on the hand. 

98 / BLADE 



blade's black finish had 
some wood smears and 
indentations but weath- 
ered the chopping fine. 

Since I was in the 
chopping mode, I went 
to the ol' woodpile and 
grabbed a chunk of 2-year- 
old oak. The first chop was 
near the edge and I got about 
4 inches of penetration. Next I 
went for the meat of the wood 
and had only a little over a quarter 
inch sticking up. I grabbed another 
log and beat the MT-2 1 into it. About 
halfway through, the wood split and I 
twisted the knife to separate the pieces. 
It made great kindling! The hard wood 
did nothing to dull the edge. The blade 
finish had more wood smears and indenta- 
tions but held up great. 

I choked up on the knife and cut some 
low-hanging branches of the tree where I 
hang my deer. The choke-up hold evened 
out the balance and made the knife very 
controllable. The grooves on the blade 
spine are 
rounded enough 
not to cut your 
thumb but 
large enough to 
provide a secure 
grip. This is a 
workingman's 
knife. 

I had some 
bamboo that 
needed trim- 
ming and the 
MT-21 was 
excellent for 
the job. I was 
going to use it 
in a draw-knife 
fashion but my 
vise was not 
cooperating, so 




I went with the reverse draw-knife style — 
pushing the knife away instead of pulling 
it toward me. The sharp edge made short 
work of the hard growth rings and did not 
splinter the bamboo. I sure love the way 
the 1095 carbon steel bites into what- 
ever it is cutting. 

Since the blade is about a quar- 
ter-inch thick, I wanted to be sure 
the tip would still penetrate. The 
modified false edge eased the 
task. I used my new phone 
book, which is 1-inch thick 
when compressed. Using 
the ice-pick grip, I stabbed 
into the book twice. The 
MT-21 penetrated it 
completely both times. 
Excellent perfor- 
mance — I could 
feel the blade 
crunch-cutting 
as it went 
through. 



A 6%-inch drop- 
point blade of 
1095 carbon steel 
and a green/black 
Micarta® semi- 
gloss handle high- 
light TOPS' Mission 
Team 21 all-around 
utility knife. MSRP: 
$229. 



blademag.com 






I 



FEB 



RUAFT. 




HlQhis.pee^d Tools. F-or 
Hardcore 1 Individuals. 



Using a log, the author beat the MT-21 
on the blade spine into a chunk of oak. 
About halfway through, the wood split 
and he twisted the knife to separate the 
pieces for kindling. The hard wood did 
nothing to dull the edge. 

The Sheath 

The sheath is ballistic nylon with a plas- 
tic insert. It has an extra pouch to store 
anything from a sharpening stone to a 
pistol magazine. A fabric-fastener strap 
secures the knife in place. 

Overall 

The drop-point design makes the MT-2 1 an 
excellent all-around knife, sturdy enough 
to handle big chopping chores yet very 
controllable doing the smaller duties. It is a 
great using knife. 

Recommendations 

As for the sheath's fabric-fastener strap, 
the knife tends to move back about 1 inch 
when secured. 1 would use a second strap 
closer to the guard to further secure the 



SPEC CHART 



Knife Mission Team 2 1 

Company TOPS Knives 

Knife Pattern All-around utility 

Blade Pattern Drop point 

Blade Steel 1095 carbon 

Rockwell Hardness 58 Re 

Blade Grind Hollow 

Blade Stock %" 

Blade Length 6 3 / 4 " 

Blade Finish Black traction coating 

Handle Green/black Micarta® semi-gloss 

Overall Length ll 3 / 4 " 

Sheath Ballistic nylon w/insert and extra 

storage pouch 
MSRP $229 



The author choked up on the knife to cut 
some low-hanging branches. The choke- 
up hold evened out the balance and 
made the knife very controllable. The 
grooves on the blade spine are rounded 
enough not to cut your thumb but large 
enough to provide a secure grip. 

knife and eliminate all play. 

For more information contact TOPS 
Knives, attn: M. Fuller, Dept. BL2, 2544 
Idaho Falls, ID 83403 208.542.0113 www. 
topsbiives.com. Hi AOf? 



«1 










www.stnderknives.com 



The sheath is ballistic nylon with a plas- 
tic insert. It has an extra pouch to store 
anything from a sharpening stone to a 
pistol magazine. 



FEBRUARY 2006 



blademag.com 



BLADE / 99 




Knife Book Ever? 

LADE's Guide To Knives S Their Values 
has been completely overhauled— and is available 



100 /BLADE 



blademag.com 



^ti"^"" Knives 

wh'k- ink*. ,,,..' Wjc,rwrt while, hri 



OftliilJrili-, ijfL i n - . 



VERy 
HIGH 

CVH) 






SHAPE 
w»!Biir-P J sirj r . KllMH , 

CJNOB 



h '"* to UK aaoe ^ enJ mJ « W « buaa, 



NOTE: tor .«n ()N , w 



M'n^cu.xa.hrn*,,, 



i Ifl! la 



»«-~Uj:,J2C1D. 



" Btikcr, farmer's. 
3 5**", bone m JB . $135 



Mm* en** en.WBft 



■'■Wtanillr.JJoo. 






■"NBa^oiw^tjo,, 



3 



>«ltM 



Pete Cohan has totally revamped the antique pocketknife value charts for the 
new BLADE Guide, adding a "Low/Medium" range and providing a special section 
that explains in simple yet complete detail which features of the knife 
affect its value, and how. 



Considered by many the most com- 
prehensive book on the subject 
of knives ever written, BLADE'S 
Guide To Knives & Their Values has been 
renamed, revised and revamped to make it 
bigger and better than ever. 

Originally titled Levine's Guide To 
Knives & Their Values and written by 
Blade Magazine Cutlery Hall-Of-Famer© 
Bernard Levine, the book has been re- 
christened to capitalize on the marquee 
name value of BLADE® magazine and to 
coincide with the editing of the book by 
BLADE'S editor, Steve Shackleford. 

Shackleford assembled some of the 
leading authorities on knives and their 
values to provide the latest in knife value 
information, as well as to update existing 
values from the book's previous editions. 
Plus, BLADE'S Guide includes more than 
2,000 illustrations, over 200 of which are 
new, as well as updated knife histories and 



contact information, new stories and much 
more — all while maintaining most of the 
educational data provided by Mr. Levine 
from the original book. 

Among the book's many highlights: 
•Accurate value information from the 
leaders in their respective fields, in- 
cluding Pete Cohan and Richard E. 
White on antique knives; Dave Ellis 
on the knives of Cutlery Hall-Of-Fam- 
ers Bob Loveless and Bill Moran; 
Larry Oden and Joe Houser on Buck 
knives; and Bill Claussen on military, 
exotic, international, kitchen and other 
knives, and more; 

•Totally revamped by Pete Cohan, the 
antique knife authority who is cur- 
rently overseeing the construction and 
development of the new National Knife 
Museum at the Smoky Mountain Knife 
Works in Sevierville, Tennessee, the 
book's valuing system is both more 



i ncjon 

(ft O TJfl) H 

a ° 2:^,2 
,_. o -o -< n .. 

09 3 C ft) _ 

w n> as,* £ 
w 



Z + gtf 
CO*, mo.? 



s>i« 




QJ 


52. 


A- 

3 


a 


ft 


<d 


-i 


N 


i-i 


| 


r 




a 


*■ 


■z 


^1 


JG 


n 




,*■ 




3 


-< 


M 


m 


» 


■q 


a 


* 


o 


hH 


fD 





SANDING BELTS FOR SHARPENING 

Add 10% to Zirc prices for Ceramic belts. 
SIZE A.0. ZIRCONIUM S.C. 

BROWN BLUE BLACK 



1"x30" 


$.75 e 


1"x42" 


.80 


2"x4872"x42" 


1.20 


2"x60" 


1.50 


2"x72" 


1.60 


2"x132" 


2.50 


3"x132" 


4.50 


4"x36" 


1.60 


4"x132" 


6.00 


6"x48" 


3.50 



.50 ea 


$1.10 ea 


1.65 


1.40 


2.50 


2.20 


3.00 


2.75 


3.50 


2.50 


6.00 


5.00 


7.50 


7.00 


3.50 


2.75 


9.00 


9.50 


6.50 


4.50 



BLACK SIL. CARBIDE WATERPROOF 

9"x11" Sheets $29.00/100 220-2500 Grit 



5 1/2"x9 1/2" Sheets $12.50/50 1 



Grit 



CERAMIC BELTS - NORTON "SG'VCARBO "MEDALLIST®" 
NORTON 8 BLUE "NORZON" ZIRCONIA, CORK BELTS 



COTTON BUFFING WHEELS & POLISHING COMPOUNDS 



DISCS, FLAP WHEELS, SHOP ROLLS 



RED HILL CORP., P.O. BOX 4234, GETTYSBURG, PA 17325 

(800)822-4003 MpE %22? 

www.sjpergrit.com ^^[lH catalog 



FEBRUARY 2006 



blademag.com 



BLADE/ 101 




ut * for DOUBl 



g[fo^^©©Qf^ 



MCK KfflVfiS of 



'™>i«r«i shapes, ft , . . 








H Botc r ,far mc . r . s 





distinguished crdftmanship 

Esi,l987 

RENOWNED WORLDWIDE FOR 
THEIR QUALITY TACTICAL 
WALKING STICKS 




AND A 

WIDE RANGE OF 

SUPERIOR HAND MADE KNIVES 

www. s wa rdea nc . com 

I n ro^sivordt ane .com 

Tel: 301 393 S123 

(message service] 

6 Munslcr 4278 SeulK Africa 



Over 2,000 images, all with updated values, grace the new BLADE Guide, 
including 200 new images, all with values never-before published in the 
previous editions. 



detailed and much easier to understand 
and to apply an exhaustive selection of 
antique pocketknives; 

•Never-before-published keys to Loveless 
and Moran knives, including value tips 
on specific Loveless and Moran marks, 
sheaths and more by ABS master smith 
and knife purveyor Dave Ellis; 

•Updated values of Randall knives by 
Rhett Stidham, president of the Randall 
Knife Society, and of Scagel knives by 
Scagel authorities Dr. James Lucie and 
Gordon White, and of other pioneer 
knifemakers by book author and pur- 
veyor Bill Claussen; 

•Compiled by Buck aficionados Larry 
Oden and Joe Houser, the most detailed 
value listings of antique Buck knives 
ever published in book form; 

•A potpourri of stories on antique knives 
by BLADE field editor Richard E. White, 
including those on where to find them, 
large-pattern pocketknives, stockmen, 
military pocketknives, scout knives, ad- 
vertising knives and more; 

•The most comprehensive listings any- 
where of existing knifemakers and 
knife purveyors and their contact in- 
formation, values on club, commemo- 
rative and limited-edition knives, and 
much, much more. 



On this and the following pages is an 
excerpt from the book entitled "Double- 
End Jack Knives," with the updated value 
chart and value information and many new 
illustrations courtesy of Pete Cohan. It is 
but a sample of the all-new, mega-com- 
prehensive BLADE'S Guide To Knives & 
Their Values — a must buy for beginning 
knife enthusiasts, cutlery aficionados and 
every blade buff in-between. 

To order your copy of BLADE'S Guide To 
Knives & Their Values, call 800.258.0929 
or write KP Books, FOB 5009, Iola, WI 
54945-5009 www.krausebooks.com. 

Ordinarily, jack knives have 
all their blades in one end, 
while knives with blades 
in both ends are either pen knives 
or multi-blades. However, certain 
patterns of folders with blades in 
both ends are too large and robust 
to be called pen knives, while they 
are too simple, with only two blades, 
to be called multi-blades. These are 
the double-end jack knives. 



102 /BLADE 



blademag.com 



FEBRUARY 2006 



Stodt-Knife-Type Doubted Jack* 

. i™.m> is called Baa ^premium |a<V w» I 
I tngc IWt mi t *■■■' ""' ou » "- 1 * n 



un 






Sdra*C*.C*JfeMȣ"* 



GaelfciMd 3QS 

T(»l»' ls:l "■'"' 
gpnviiftt stag. SS7S 

vtou 




, tftuHKrt pbbKxo i**s.b«K MB. 
r ,350:5l/r SI" 



caaafflwCat™. 



ill 

jatk. (Mlcnn.il n-'Uulukl: 4 
(brown W&B* 



UTITJr 



I- 






I, ft*.******* i' re "" , " ,, ilCkbW1C *"* 



S16S 






BLADE'S Guide is much more than antique pocketknives only. It also has 
values on the knives of Blade Magazine Cutlery Hall-Of-Famers© Bob Loveless, 
Bill Moran, W.D. "Bo" Randall, William Scagel and many more, as well as the 
most complete listings of Buck knife values ever published, plus the values 
of hunting, military, commemorative, limited-edition, kitchen, club, exotic 
and many other kinds of knives. 



One unusual type is the double- 
end "melon tester." The long, 
thin knife with a slim spear blade 
and a pen blade is covered under 
"Special Purpose Jack Knives." 
So is the smaller double-end "florist's 
knife." 

Farmer's Jacks 

An even more unusual type of 
double-end jack is the Wharncliffe- 
shaped "farmer's jack." Its two blades 
are a pruning blade in the wide end 



and a spey or budding blade in the 
narrow end. 

Base values for DOUBLE-END 
JACK KNIVES of the indicated 
shapes, from 3 9/16 to 4 3/8 inches 
long, two large blades, full bolsters 
and bone-stag handles. Excellent, 
unsharpened condition. 

NOTE: For MELON TESTERS 
and FLORIST'S KNIVES see the 
segment on "Special Purpose 
Jack Knives"; for MUSKRATS and 
DOUBLE-END TRAPPERS see the 
segment on "Trappers, Muskrats 
and Large Trappers." 



Stock-Knife-Type 
Double-End Jacks 

With the exception of the sunfish, 
the farmer's jack and the double-end 
melon tester, all double-end jack 
knives are built on either cattle-knife - 
or premium-stock-knife-handle 

frames (see "Multi-Blade Knives"). 
In the early years of the 20th century, 
the names "cattle knife" and "stock 
knife" were sometimes used for 
two-bladed knives. Since the 1920s, 
however, the names have been used 
only for knives with three or more 
blades. Larger two-bladed versions 
are considered jack knives, no 
matter if they are single-ended or 
double-ended. Smaller, two-bladed, 
double-ended versions that are 3 1/2 
inches long or less and come with a 
pen second blade are pen knives. 

The single-ended jack that is 
based on the premium stock knife 
is called the "premium jack." The 
premium jack has several double- 
ended counterparts. The most 
impressive of these is the TEXAS 
JACK or MOOSE. 

Texas jacks are big, usually at 
least 3 7/8 inches long. Their size 
may account for their "Texas" name, 
while the large blade out each end 
may have reminded someone of a 
bull moose's giant antlers. 

The master blade of a Texas Jack 
is always a wide clip. The second 
blade is a spear or a long, wide spey. 

Slender, double-end premium 
jacks with either a slender clip 
and a long spey or else two clip 
blades are considered double-end 
trappers (see "Trappers, Muskrats 
and Large Trappers"). 

DOUBLE-END PREMIUM JACKS 
are serpentine or, rarely, sleeveboard 
knives with a clip blade in one end 
and a small spey or a pen in the other. 
Small versions with a pen blade are 
pen knives. 



FEBRUARY 2006 



blademag.com 



BLADE/ 103 




your knife rights 



mi 




rights 



Search and Seizure: Know 
The Law Part II 



By Judge Lowell Bray 
BLADE® field editor 



A search and seizure backfires on 
police officers in South Dakota 



Last time, "Your Knife Rights" began 
consideration of the Fourth Amend- 
ment of the Constitution, which 
says in part, "the right of the people to be 
secure in their persons, houses, papers, and 
effects, against unreasonable searches and 
seizures, shall not be violated." This time, 
"Your Knife Rights" continues the study 
by examining a case involving a concealed 
item taken from a person in a public place. 
Such cases generally have been 
analyzed in two steps: 1) Did the officer 
have probable cause to arrest the person, 
and if not, 2) Did he have justification to 
stop the person in what has come to be 
known as a "Terry stop"? (Editor's note: 
Basically, a "Terry stop" is when an officer 
is justified in searching an individual who 
is committing or appears to be committing 
a crime, is at close range and whom the 
officer believes is armed and dangerous to 
the officer or others.) A good illustration of 
the application of these legal principles is a 
case that arose on an Indian reservation in 
South Dakota. 

U.S. v. Brandon In The Woods 

According to reports, at approximately 
11:28 a.m. on Feb. 21, 2004, Tammy Hale 
called the police department of the Chey- 
enne River Sioux Tribe and reported that 
a man had walked into house No. 476 at 
"Chinatown Housing" with a knife. Hale 
stated that the man was waving the knife 
"all over the place." 

104 /BLADE 



Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe officers 
Jeremy Webb and Halley Maynard arrived 
in the Chinatown Housing area at 11:33 
a.m. They had no name or description to 
work with other than that the person with 
the knife at the Hale residence was a male. 

Officer Maynard observed a man walk- 
ing toward his squad car about 30 or 40 
yards from house No. 476. Maynard did 
not see the man walking out of the house 



"The officers 
involved in this 
investigation basi- 
cally attempted to 
work backwards." 
— the court 



or even out of the lot itself. Maynard also 
noticed that the man was carrying an object 
in his right hand, an object that he put in his 
right front pocket. Maynard testified that 
he did not know what the object was and 
none of his observations up to that point 
led him to believe that the man possessed 
a weapon. 

Officers Webb and Maynard then 



pulled up to the man in their squad car, 
stepped out of the vehicle, asked the man 
to place his hands on his head, handcuffed 
him and searched him. The officers found 
a 3-inch folding knife in the man's right 
front pocket and transported him to police 
headquarters. 

The court discussed the law as follows: 

The Fourth Amendment guar- 
antees "[t]he right of the people to 
be secure in their persons, houses, 
papers, and effects, against unreason- 
able searches and seizures." Under 
the Fourth Amendment's exclusionary 
rule, evidence obtained in violation of 
the Fourth Amendment cannot be used 
in a criminal proceeding against the 
victim of an illegal search and seizure. 

[The] [defendant makes essentially 
two claims here. First, he contends 
that the investigatory stop on the 
street was an unreasonable search 
under the Fourth Amendment, thereby 
requiring the suppression of the 
knife subsequently seized from him 
and statements he later made to law 
enforcement. Second, he argues that 
his arrest violated the Fourth Amend- 
ment, as it was not supported by prob- 
able cause. 

An investigatory, or Terry, stop with- 
out a warrant is valid only if police offi- 
cers have a reasonable and [clear or 
distinct] suspicion that criminal activity 



blademag.com 



FEBRUARY 2006 



may be afoot. When justifying a particu- 
lar stop, police officers "must be able to 
point to specific and [clear and distinct] 
facts, which, taken together with 
rational inferences from those facts, 
reasonably warrant that intrusion." A 
Terry stop may turn into an arrest if 
the stop lasts for an unreasonably long 
time or if officers use unreasonable 
force. During a Terry stop, officers can 
check for weapons and may take addi- 
tional steps reasonably necessary to 
protect their personal safety and main- 
tain the status quo during the course of 
the stop. 



"Many thousands 

of people in South 

Dakota routinely 

carry knives in 

their pockets." 

— the court 



The government has a couple of 
problems with the claimed Terry stop 
that took place here. The first prob- 
lem is the lack of specific facts that 
might warrant this particular intrusion. 
The Supreme Court long ago made [it] 
clear that it is appropriate for police to 
conduct an investigative stop "when the 
victim of a street crime seeks immedi- 
ate police aid and gives a description 
of [the] assailant." 

We have no "street crime" involved 
here. There was no description of an 
assailant here. The only information 
provided was that there was a man 
with a knife who was waving it around 
in the house. Maynard testified that he 
saw a man on the street put something 
in his pocket. Maynard had no idea 
what the [alleged] knife looked like, let 
alone what the man [who allegedly had 
been waving the knife] looked like. 

Without question, it would be at 
least somewhat unusual for an assail- 
ant to wield a [3-inch pocketknife] as 
a weapon of choice in a knife attack. 
It would be presumptuous for an offi- 
cer to surmise that an object small 
enough to be carried in a man's pocket 
was the weapon involved here. When 
one considers the threat of an immi- 
nent attack with a knife or a stabbing, 
an image of a [pocketknife] does not 
generally enter one's mind. 

Indeed, Maynard testified that 
he did not know what the defendant 
was putting in his pocket and, at the 
point he stopped to investigate, had 



not observed anything that led him to 
believe the man may have been carrying 
a weapon. These statements seemingly 
contradict any claim that reasonable 
suspicion existed. Essentially, what 
the officers were looking at when they 
stopped was nothing more than a man 
walking normally in the street who put 
something small in his pocket. 

The second problem for the govern- 
ment is the fact that the two officers 
handcuffed the defendant immediately 
upon coming into contact with him. 
There is no claim that [the] defendant 
consented to any seizure or search. 

After reviewing cases that said not every 
time a person was handcuffed resulted in a 
"seizure" for Fourth Amendment purposes, 
the court said: 

In this case, the officers' "reason- 
able suspicion" as to [the defendant] 
walking normally on the street, as 
already discussed, was nil. Moreover, 
the officers did not conduct a pat-down 
search when they initially confronted 
the defendant. Instead, they imme- 
diately handcuffed [him] and then 
proceeded with the intrusive search. 
Intuitively, when an officer restrains 
an individual with handcuffs, it is clear 
that the individual is not free to leave. 
It is hard to imagine any situation more 
tantamount to an actual arrest. 

If officers do not have a reasonable!,] 
[clear and distinct] suspicion sufficient 
for the initial detention, a subsequent 
search will be held unconstitutional 
even though probable cause is later 
established. Regardless of whether the 
Terry stop in this instance exceeded 
permissible bounds, the court is not 
able to conclude that this defendant's 
later arrest was supported by prob- 
able cause. The officers involved in 
this investigation basically attempted to 
work backwards. 

Probable cause for an arrest exists 
if, at the moment the arrest was made, 
the facts and circumstances within the 
officers' knowledge and of which they 
had reasonably trustworthy information 
were sufficient to warrant a prudent 
person in believing that an offense 
ha[d] been committed. Probable cause 
is evaluated "not from the perspective 
of an omniscient observer, but on the 
facts as they would have appeared to 
a reasonable person in the position of 
the arresting officer." 

The fact that the defendant had 
something in his hand and put it in his 
pocket is not evidence of any threat. 
In fact, it is evidence to the contrary. 
If the defendant had some dangerous 
weapon and intended to use it, he would 
not have put it in his pocket. It is also 



DOES YOUR 
KNIFE HAVE 




ISSUES? 



USE ONLY THE BEST 

HEAT TREATING 

SERVICES FOR THE 

CUSTOM KNIFE MAKER: 

Vacuum Heat Treating 
and Cold Treatments 

for Tool Steels, 

Stainless Steels and 

Specialty Steels: 

ATS-34, 

BG-42, 

CPM-S30V 



215 Race Street 
Meadville, PA 16335 

814.333.1782 
FAX: 814.333.2533 

H\ PETERS' 

mum HEATTREATINC, INC. 



WORRY FREE Heat Treating 
www.petersh eattreat.com 



FEBRUARY 2006 



blademag.com 



BLADE/ 105 



Bonds House 
Of Cutlery 




m 



Ui'/M 



702.87O.2J4/ 

LAS VEGAS, NV. 



We Have 

Gerber 

Collectibles 



%t Home Of Hard To Find Cutlery jf 





www.levineknives.com 




* Specializing in 
folders 



• The rising stars 

• Fair prices 



The best makers 

Dealer of Handmade Knives 
Phone: (203) 438-5294 



P0 Box 416 • Ridgefield, CT 06877 

Gary Levine Fine Knives 




1-800-956-5696 Toll free USA & Canada PRICE • SELECTION • SERVICE 



Mp«'L^ > 



)BerettaU.S.A. 



IAWB 5MF f ™B? k^/II GERBER 

1 UCCNQWr^!!*. BLADES' 



^COLUMBIA EMEUS 
W% R I V E R I ' 





BENCH> <ADE 



www.bestknives.com 




your knife rights 

rights 



clear that he had the legal right to carry 
a knife in his pocket or in his hand. 

There was no evidence that[,] at 
the time [the defendant] had the knife 
in the street[,] that he had any intent to 
unlawfully assault someone. In fact, the 
evidence at best would be that he had 
no such intent. Whatever he had in his 
hand, he had placed in his pocket. 

The court takes judicial notice of 
certain well-known facts. Many thou- 
sands of people in South Dakota 
routinely carry knives in their pockets. 
Every hunter of deer, antelope, pheas- 
ants, grouse, rabbits, and other wild 
game carries a knife. Every person 
going fishing carries a knife. It is frankly 
outrageous that a citizen in South 
Dakota walking down the street with 
a knife in his pocket can be stopped, 
required to raise his hands on his 
head, be handcuffed, searched, and 
then hauled away to the police station. 



"It is clear that 
he had the legal 
right to carry a 
knife in his pock- 
et or in his hand." 
— the court 

This is not some activity that is taking 
place in a metropolitan area. This is 
rural South Dakota. Even assuming 
the search of defendant's person was a 
legal search, finding the knife provided 
no probable cause whatsoever to 
arrest the defendant. Finding a small 
knife in the pocket of a South Dakotan 
is about as indicative of criminal activity 
as someone wearing a seed corn cap. 

The court granted the motion to 
suppress the search, the knife and the state- 
ments the defendant made after his arrest. 

[Facts taken from United States v. Brandon 
In The Woods, 354 F. Supp. 2d 1087 (2005).] 

The author has been a lawyer since 1973 
and a judge since 1982. He is secretary/ 
treasurer of The Knifemakers ' Guild, a 
journeyman smith in the American Blade- 
smith Society and a charter member of the 
Florida Knifemakers Association. 

Blade 



106 /BLADE 



blademag.com 



FEBRUARY 2006 





Holiday Savings! 



Order by Jan. 15, 2006 and Shipping & Handling is FREE! 



Blade's < 




Blade's Guide to 

Knives & Their 

Values 

Covers most all knives made around 
the world, mostly from the 19th 
century through the present, with 
up-to-date values, 2,000+ photos 
for easy identification, and feature 
articles highlighting trends in the 
industry. Plus, you'll find detailed 
lists of custom knifemakers and 
companies. 

Softcover • 8-1/2 x 1 1 • 576 pages 

2,000 b&w photos 

ltem# LGK6 • $29.99 




How to Make 
Folding Knives 

A Step-By-Step How-To 

by Ron Lake, Frank Centofante 

and Wayne Clay 
Follow easy instructions on how 
to make a folding knife. Three top 
custom makers include safety tips, 
suppliers' lists, and answers to 
frequently asked questions. 
Softcover* 8-1/2x11 • 194 pgs 
350 b&w photos 
ltem# KMF01 • $15.95 




THE WORLD'S GREATEST KNIFE BOOK 



2GTHANNJAL 

KNIUIS 

20062P 

f 



OVER 10DO D LADES IN VIVID COLOR 



Knives 2006 

26th Annual Edition 

Edited by Joe Kertzman 

Get the latest custom knifemaking 

trends and techniques straight 

from the experts, showcased in 

1,000+ brilliant color photos. Plus, 

you'll discover a valuable directory 

of knifemakers, organized by state. 

Softcover -8-1/4x1 0-7/8 

304 pages • 1000+ color photos 

Item* KN2006 • $24.99 



Blade's Guide to 

*v Making 
'nives 



rifflw 



Blade's Guide to 
Making Knives 

Edited by Joe Kertzman 
Gain professional tips for grinding 
blades, crafting hunting knives, 
forging pattern-welded steel into 
intricate designs, making folding 
knives, and fashioning the important 
bolster between knife and blade. 
Features detailed instructions and 
250 striking color illustrations. 

Softcover »8-V4x 10-7/8 
160 pages • 250 color photos 

Item* BGKFM • $24.99 



Dillon* * Manilla ttutir* ■ Appllcatloni 



Tactical Knives 

by Dietmar Pohl 
Illustrates the development, varieties, 
and applications of tactical knives 
from their origins through today. 
Dozens are identified and showcased, 
with special attention given to World 
War II and Vietnam War knives. 
Softcover • 7-34 x 10 • 192 pages 
10 b&w photos • 150 color photos 
Item* TCTKN • $24.99 




Wayne Goddard's 
$50 Knife Shop 

by Wayne Goddard 
Demonstrates how to outfit a knife 
making shop for about $50 using 
household and Junkyard items. 
Detailed diagrams show the design 
and construction of all tools needed 
to make great knives on a shoestring 
budget. 

Softcover* 8-1/2x11 
160 pages* 75 b&w photos 

8-page color section 
Item* WGBW* $19.95 



Knife Talk II The High 
Performance Blade 

by Ed Fowler 

Ed Fowler presents 65 articles on 

such topics as function, design, and 

technique; philosophy; and forging and 

heat-treating. He also discusses knife 

manufacturing and industry legends. 

Softcover • 8-1/2 x 11 • 200 pages 

250 b&w photos • 8-page color 

section 

Item* KNTA2* $19.99 




To order call 

800-258-0929 

Offer K26K 

KP Books, Offer K26K 
P.O. Box 5009 
lolaWI 54945-5009 

www.krausebooks.com 

•Shipping & handling is free to U.S. 
addresses for orders received by 
Jan. 15, 2006. Non-US addresses 
please add $20.95 for the first book 
and $5.95 for each additional. After 
1/15/06, please add $4 for the first 
book and $2.25 for each additional 
book sent to U.S. addresses. 

Residents of CA, IA, IL, KS, NJ, PA, 
SD, TN, VA, Wl please add appropriate 
sales tax. 

KP Books is an imprint of 
F+W Publications, Inc. 



®M 



"'{&***& 



By David Rhea 



A.G. Russell said he does 90 percent of his sharp- 
ening on ceramic rods, such as the A.G. Russell 
Ceramic Sharpener. The rods are set in a V, 15 
degrees to a side. The rods are a 90+ percent 
alumina ceramic and the walnut base is 10 1/4 
inches long. MSRP: $34.95 ($9.95 for a single 
replacement rod). The knife is the new Katz A1/ST, 
with a 5 1/2-inch blade of 440C Plus Stainless. 
The handle is stag. MSRP: $195. 



f*v: 



it Take? 

Go beyond a certain point and 
you needlessly remove metal 



108 /BLADE 



blademag.com FEBRUARY 2006 




There is an old commercial that went, 
"How many licks does it take to get 
to the center of a Tootsie Roll Pop®? 
One, two ... c-r-r-r-unch! Nobody knows!" 
In that spirit, we at BLADE® decided to 
inquire about how many passes across a 
sharpening stone it would take to properly 
sharpen a knife. More to the point, How 
much should you sharpen a blade before 



you are needlessly removing metal? 

BLADE asked the question of a few of 
the authorities in the field, and one thing 
became crystal clear: There is no formu- 
laic answer. Every knife is different and/or 
used under diverse circumstances, and so 
requires differing amounts of sharpening. 

"To be able to say how many strokes it 
takes to sharpen a knife," Blade Magazine 






FEBRUARY 2006 



blademag.com 



BLADE/ 109 



nives 




www. newgraham. com 
1.866^ 




Great Prices and 
Great Service on: 

Chris Reeve Knives 

Spyderco 

Lonewolf 

Benchmade 

SOG 

William Henry 

Case 

Case Select 

Victorinox 

Microtech 

MOD 

PentagonLights 

INOVA 

Surefire 

Longbow 

AlMar 

Blackjack 

And over 50 other 

brands featured in our 

store and at 
www.new graham, com 

566 Virginia Ave. 
Bluefield,VA 24605 




Cutlery Hall-Of-Famer© A.G. Russell be- 
gan, "requires that all knives dull uniform- 
ly. The fact is, if you sharpen your knife 
as soon as it loses the state of sharpness 
you enjoy, it's only going to take a stroke or 
two." He added that if you continue to use 



your knife until it is "dead dull," then it is 
going to take a dozen strokes or more. 

Custom knifemaker R.J. Martin agrees 
with A.G. "There really is no fixed number 
of strokes that you can tell everybody," he 
stressed. "Every knife has different thick- 




A.G. Russell said he 
prefers setting the initial 
bevel of the edge with 
a DMT diamond stone. 
DMT's model W6FPSH 
6-inch diamond whetstone 
comes in a plastic case 
with mounting capability 
and non-skid rubber feet. 



110 /BLADE 



blademag.com 



FEBRUARY 2006 



nesses and can be made out of different 
steels that take different amounts of sharp- 
ening. There are so many different stones 
and grits and pressures, you can never say 
'20 strokes will do it.'" 

"There is no magic formula or so many 
strokes," concurred BLADE field editor, 
ABS master smith and sharpening wizard 
Wayne Goddard, who taught a sharpening 
seminar at the recent BLADE Show West 
(for more on the show, see the story on 
page 18). "I don't think you can say there 
is such a thing as an average number of 
strokes. What good is it to know what the 
average is?" 

OK, so scratch that question. How- 
ever, one thing on which there is general 
agreement is that most people tend to over- 
sharpen their knives. That is, they continue 
to drag the blade across an abrasive sur- 
face beyond the point where the knife can 
be considered fully sharpened, removing 
metal and years of use from the knife. 

A.G. is particularly perplexed by peo- 
ple who use sharpening as a form of enter- 
tainment. "People who sit in front of the 
television with a wet stone and a knife and 
sharpen away for some period of time are 
just wearing their knife out to no purpose," 
he exclaimed. "If you take more than two 
or three strokes on a diamond stone, and 
another couple of strokes on a ceramic rod 
or Arkansas stone, you're wasting steel." 



"Most people tend 

to over-sharpen 

their knives." 

— the author 



Wayne teaches that there is a proper way 
to sharpen a blade. However, he empha- 
sized that others may have their own tried- 
and-true methods, and he is not trying to 
knock anyone else's approach. "There's not 
any argument. I do it the way I do it — and 
that's the way I do it," he said with convic- 
tion. With that, let's examine his two-step 
process: Metal removal and refining. 

Metal Removal and Refining 

Wayne explained that sharpening knives 
takes either two different stones or one com- 
bination stone with the two correct types 
and sizes of grit to do the job. His choice for 
setting the bevel is Norton's medium Crys- 
tolon silicon carbide stone. "Nothing else 
cuts quite as fast," he asserted. 

He recommends holding the blade 
at about 15 degrees while roughing the 
edge — a flatter angle for cutting softer 
materials and more upright for harder ma- 
terials, depending on the knife's intended 



DEALERS ONLY! DEALERS ONLY! DEALERS ONLY! DEALERS ONLY! 



Blue Ridge Knives /^^ 



® 



Blue Ridge Knives • Department BL • 166 Adwolfe Road • Marion, VA 24354 



Your One Source For Knives And Swords 



Wholesale Distributor 



Over 270 Brands 



Online Shopping 



Send a copy of your business license and $3 [refundable] 
for 7SS page color catalog. Minimum order required. 

Phone (S76) 783-6143 • Fax C27G) 783-9298 
E-Mail: onestop@talueridgeknives • Web Site: www.blueridgeknives.com 



<Hen &. Rooster® 

^ World's Finest Since 1845 
Celebrating 160 Years 




1845-2005 



First Established in 
Solingen, Germany 
in 1845, the Hen & Rooster* 
trademark is renowned as one 
ofthe wo rid '5 fi nest cutle ry 
brands. In celebration of the 
1 60th Anniversary of Hen & 
Rooster*, we are proud to 
present this exquisite com- 
memorative Crown Stag Bowie. 
This beautiful collectors piece 
features laser engraved stain- 




gold plating. Each knife is a 

serialized limited edition of 

only 300 pieces. Be one ofthe 

few to own this historical piece, 



other 1 60th Anniversary items 

availble only through 

Frost Cutlery™. 



SProst *&utlery 

CALL US FOR 

A DEALER IN YOUR AREA: 

1-800-251-7768 

or visit our web site atwww.knifesatesinfo.com 



FEBRUARY 2006 



blademag.com 



BLADE/ 111 




W$8$i) : |-(D%® 



WWW.SUNFISHF0RGE.COM 



$m ^mm 3 CI CI 

P.O. Box 13 

Success, MO 65570 

573-674-3045 



When's the last time you saw a FORGED, 



^?T3- 



Visit WWW.duebUOI.lt, and while browsing, have a 

look at our exclusive, forged kitchen cutlery with 

Olivewood, Ebony, Oak and Stag handles 

www.duebuoi.it 

Made in Itah 



HAWKINS KNIFE MAKING SUPPLIES 

110 BUCKEYE RD., FAYETTEVILLE, GA 30214 

PHONE 770-964-1023 FAX 770-306-2877 

CONTACT: RADE, JUNE OR RUSSELL HAWKINS 

SUPPLIES FOR THE PROFESSIONAL AND AMATEUR 

BELTS: NORTON, KLINGSPOR, 3-M • STEEL BAR STOCK: 154-CM, BG-42, S-60-V, S-90-V 

BANDSAW BLADES: LENOX BI-METAL AND WOOD CUTTING 

DRILL BITS, TAPS, S/S SPLINE HEAD SCREWS 0-80 THRU 6-40 

BADER GRINDERS, BALDOR BUFFERS AND MICRO LATHES 

AUTOMATIC PARTS: COIL SPRINGS, CUTTERS AND ARBORS 

EPOXY, SUPER GLUE, SOLDER AND FLUX • BUFFING SUPPLIES: COMPOUNDS AND BUFFS 

HANDLE MATERIAL: WOOD, MICARTA, BONE AND HORN 

MORE ITEMS AVAILABLE; SEND $2.00 FOR COMPLETE LISTING 
ALL MAJOR CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED 









We offer a full line of quality, name brand knives, 
swords and other tools at below retail costs. 



cow vim 

ICOLUMBIA 

IftlVERHit! 




5ERBEI 



(SpydercO 



»AW^V y;\ 



KA-BAR 

Knives 



k«»l\&w 



SniiLliilQWtjvsHMV 



Al. MAR KNIVES 



m 

MYERCHIN. INC. 



BOKER 



- 713-935-0886 - 



WWW.BECKWITHSBLADES.COM 



& 



arpenmg ^^ 



purpose. He said to cut into the stone, edge 
forward, until you raise a wire edge, which 
is formed as the two sharpening bevels 
meet at the edge. The thin piece of blade 
material bends back and forth from the ac- 
tion on the stone and is not removed. 

"When the wire edge is not lined up, 
the knife will not appear to be sharp, yet 
sufficient material may have already been 
removed," Wayne noted. "Since the edge 
does not feel sharp, it's often worked some 
more on the stone, and many knives are 
worn out prematurely from this. When the 
wire edge is lined up, the blade will seem 
sharp. I refer to this phenomenon as 'false 
sharp.' The blade may shave hair and slice 
paper, but when the edge contacts any type 
of hard substance, the wire edge bends 
over and the knife will quit cutting." 

From there, to get a superior and long last- 
ing edge, you need only to properly remove 
the wire edge. To do this, he recommends a 




112 /BLADE 



blademag.com 



FEBRUARY 2006 




fine India aluminum oxide stone with a grit 
size of 320. At an angle of around 30 degrees, 
gently stroke the blade, alternating from side 
to side, until the wire is removed. The key 
is to stroke the blade very lightly to give a 
hair-shaving edge, yet leaving enough mi- 
croteeth to give superior slicing ability. He 
uses odorless kerosene for a sharpening fluid 
but says WD-40 will also work, though at the 
risk of clogging the stones over time. Oil also 



"Hold the blade 

straight up and 

down and you 

eliminate the 

guesswork." 

— A.G. Russell 



will work but is slow cutting. Kerosene, he 
advised, is the quickest, cleanest and most 
economical fluid. 

Conversely, A.G. said he never uses sil- 
icon carbide stones. He prefers setting the 
initial bevel of the edge with a DMT dia- 
mond stone. He insists that if you sharpen 




FEBRUARY 2006 



blademag.com 



BLADE/ 113 



*& 



arpening ^^ 

into the stone, edge first as if you are trying 
to peel off a decal, then the wire edge is a 
non-issue. He also said that once you estab- 
lish the bevel that produces your edge, you 
should never have to go back to that, unless 
you really beat up the blade. 

"I think everybody should have an 
India stone, and either an Arkansas stone 
or white ceramic," he explained. "Ninety 
percent of my sharpening gets done on ce- 
ramic rods. I have ceramic sharpeners that 
are set in a V, to 15 degrees to a side. That 
way you can hold the blade straight up and 



down and you eliminate the guesswork." 

When someone brings him a knife that 
needs re-beveling, A.G. uses the diamond 
stone. "If I didn't have diamonds, I would 
use India stone. If I didn't have the ceramic 
rods," he added, "I would finish on Arkan- 
sas stone." 

While many people cut paper to test 
a blade's sharpness, Russell cuts plastic- 
foam packing peanuts instead. Since his 
method does not involve looking for a wire 
edge, inspection and testing are critical. 

"Slicing a foam peanut so thin, super, 
super thin, that the slice flutters down like 
a snowflake — I mean, so thin you can al- 
most see through them — you can't do that 
except with a really sharp edge. It's much 




The Long Forgotten 
Turkey Stone 

According to Blade Magazine Cutlery 
Hall-Of-Famer© A.G. Russell, Crysto- 
lon and Carborundum are both trade names 
for silicon carbide and are used in a number 
of sharpeners. The names date back to the 
19th century. However, he said, long before 
either of them was the Turkey stone. 

A very fine sandstone, Turkey stone 
came from Turkey. In addition, there was 
the Arkansas stone. Made of novaculite, a 
sedimentary rock that consists mostly of 
microcrystalline quartz, Arkansas stone 
has a super fine grain. Hot Springs, Arkan- 
sas, is the world source of novaculite. Of 
the two, Turkey stone and Arkansas stone, 
the latter was much more expensive. 

When the technology was developed 
to make sharpening stones from alumi- 
num oxide, A.G. said the resulting stones 
were called India stones. The stones were 
not from India but the thinking was that 
by naming the stones after another exotic 
country, it would be easier to lure people 
away from using Turkey stones. The mar- 
keting strategy obviously worked because 
nobody but a few historians are aware of 
Turkey stones today, while you would be 
hard put to find a true knife aficionado 
who has not heard of India stones. 




' Hand sharpened, 6" convex gronnd blade insures deep penetration 

' Foil tang for extta strength 

' .140" thick and 10 1/2" long D2 tool steel blade is double dfaw heat-tteated 

with ctyogenic deep freeze tteatment to RcH 59-60 
' Available in Sotegrip, G-10, or Limited Edition Desert Ironwood with genuine Mammoth Ivoty funning boat inlay 
' Cadmium undercoat with epoxy top coat exceeds ASTMP 1000-hour salt spray for maximum corrosion resistance 
' Lifetime wartanty 
' Designed by Registered Alaskan Big-Game Guide/Outfitter, Charles Allen, Ptesident of Knives of Alaska 



114 /BLADE 



blademag.com 



FEBRUARY 2006 



better than slicing paper [for testing the 
edge]," he noted. 

R.J. Martin never uses sharpening 
stones. He sharpens all his knives on a 1- 
inch slack-belt setup, where the belt is run- 
ning over two wheels and is unsupported in 
between, which produces an "appleseed" 
or convex edge. He sharpens with the edge 
down to create his wire edge, which he 
said "produces a very, very strong edge, at 
the same time a very sharp edge." 

He finishes his blades very lightly 
on a buffer to remove the wire edge. He 
knows everyone does not have powered 
machinery, so he recommends Spyderco's 
Tri-Angle Sharpmaker set. "It's more or 
less a foolproof sharpening device. It has 
ceramic rods and it holds [the blade edge] 
at a pretty decent angle," he observed. 

To inspect the edge, Martin recom- 
mends a magnifier such as an Optivisor. 
He said the biggest problem people have 
sharpening knives is that they cannot re- 
ally tell what is going on at the very edge 
of the knife. 



"Look at the 
edge so you can 
see what's going 

on. It's really 
essential." 

— R.J. Martin 



"[The edge is] small and difficult to see; 
if you hold it under a light, it gets glary," 
he said. "Having even just a regular pair of 
reading glasses — something about a three 
power — you can look at the edge so you can 
see what's going on. It's really essential." 

Keep It Sharp 

How many passes does it take to sharpen 
a knife? The answer is that there is no set 
answer. It basically boils down to prefer- 
ence, practice and observation. The pros 
say to try different stones or rods to see 
which ones you like. Practice holding your 
blade steadily at the correct angle, or use 
a guide or a ceramic stone set to an angle 
that reflects your intended use. 

Most of all, keep your knife sharp. A 
dull knife is the byproduct of laziness and, 
for any application, is more dangerous than 
a sharp one. 

For the contact information for the 
sharpeners in the story, see "Where To Get 
'Em " on page 95. 



Need Genuine INDIA SAMBAR STAG? 
WE GOT IT! 



INDIA SAMBAR STAG 

Scales, Rolls, Tapers, 
Carvers, Crowns & Gun grips. 



MOTHER OR PEARL 

Black Lip, Gold Lip & White 

In Presentation, A+,A&B grades. 



\\W^4 




Scales in all sizes available: 51/2x11/2-5x1 1/2 
41/2x1 1/2-41/2x1 1/4- 41/4x1 1/4-31/2x1 



1/8 + Thickness, 3 1/2-4x1-11/2 inch 
scales available. 



We alSO deal in: Real Bane Imi-Stag, Smooth White Bone, 
Jigged Dyed Bone, Resin Casted Crown Handles, Buffalo Horn & Exotic Wood. 

Shop Online at: 



www.IndiaSambarStag.com 

Govt of India lifted the embargo on exports of 
Sambar Stag in 2005. We have all the sizes 
available in large quantity. All our Stag is Genuine 
India Sambar/Cheetal Stag only, recently 



imported from India. 

AKS . 

AMERICAN KNIFEMAKING SUPPLIES 



lli 



210.490.8580 TX - 718.544.5727 NY 



WWW B LA DEGALLERY C OM 




FEBRUARY 2006 



blademag.com 



BLADE/ 115 



m Tn< er a waixl s 















*\ 



w ^\ 



. 



HANDMADE 
AWARDS 

This year s award recipients reflect 

some of the finest the handmade 

industry has to offer 

By BLADE® staff 



"S, 



y 



vn 






- 






r v 






BEST DAMASCUS Shane Taylor won the Best 
Damascus Award for his Reign of Evil folding art 
dagger. Knife highlights: Third in a series of 12 that 
tells the.story about the battle between good and . — 
evil. THe "demon" in the blade is also in the window 
frame in the handle. The damascus is a nitre-blued 
15N20 and 1084 mosaic. Shane's list price for a simi- 
lar model: $21,000. Other models he offers: A little 
of everything, from miniatures to swords, specializ- 
ing in the high end. His annual output: 10-15 pieces. 
Sales: Accepts custom orders (two-year waiting list) 
and sells at shows (ABS Reno Show and BLADE 
Show). Near-future projects: Fourth knife in the 
Reign of Evil sertes. (Point Seven knife photo) 

) 

r x- 



^ 



\ 



K 



yx 



116/ BLADE 



/" 



blademag.com FEBRUARY 2006 




BEST UTILITY HUNTER Thad Buchanan won the Best Utility 
Hunter Award for his semi-skinner. Knife highlights: Hol- 
low-ground blade of CPM 154CM steel, maroon linen Micarta® 
handle, 416 fittings and leather sheath. Overall length: 8 1/2 
inches. Maker's list price for a similar knife: $350. Other 
models Thad offers: Slip-joints and fixed-blade utility 
knives. His annual output: About 50 knives. Sales: 
Accepts custom orders and sells knives at 
shows (Oregon Knife Show, Las Vegas 
Custom Knife Show, BLADE Show 
West and, tentatively, the BLADE 
Show). Future projects: 
Locking-liner folders. 
(BladeGallery.com 
knife photo) 




The winners of the 2005 BLADE- 
handmade™ Awards make what 
qualify among the best knives 
anywhere — and they went a long way 
toward proving it by pitting their work 
against the world's finest makers in judg- 
ing competitions at participating knife 
shows over the past year. 

With the category/categories they 
won listed first, the winners are: Best 



BEST FIXED BLADE Steven Rapp wo, 
Best Fixed Blade for his California Bow- 
ie. All engraving is by Julie Warenski. 
Other models he offers: Sheffield-style 
bowies and a few fantasy pieces in da- 
mascus and stone. His annual output: 
20-24 knives. Sales: Accepts custom 
orders. Future project: A knife with a 
spiral handle of gold quartz. (BladeGal- 
lery.com knife photo) 



Fantasy Knife and Best In Show: Jack 
Levin; Best Folding Knife: Richard Rog- 
ers; Best Damascus: Shane Taylor; Best 
Non-Damascus Handforged Knife: Mike 
Williams; Best Miniature: Hans Wein- 
mueller; Best Art Knife: Donald Vogt; 
Best Fighter: Joe Flournoy; Best Fixed 
Blade: Steven Rapp; and Best Utility 
Hunter: Thad Buchanan. 

In addition to garnering the attendant 
prestige and free publicity in BLADE® 
generated by the awards, the winners 
who have not been profiled in recent is- 
sues of BLADE will be profiled in BLADE 
in the near future. 

Rules and Participating Shows 

The BLADEhandmade categories are 




Onion 



Model 1079 

MSRP $99.95 

Steel J)2 tool steel with 

Black Teflon 8 coating 

Handle...Double-injection-molded 
Santoprene® 
(glass filled nylon) 

Blade 10 in. (25.4 cm) 

Overall.,.16 in. 

Weight...22.0 

Includes Kydex 

sheath 




kfttkaw 

K N I V% E S 

For information or a dealer near you, call: 1-800-325-28 
wwiv.kershawknives.com 

Kershaw Ken Onion knives are covered by US Patent Numbers: 
5.802.722 • 6,145,202 • 6,338,431 ■ 6.397.476 



FEBRUARY 2006 



blademag.com 



BLADE/ 117 




alerN 

1-800-356-8507 

Fax 562403-4261 

email info @procutdist.com 



mstim&Mw^^® 



BEST MINIATURE Hans 

Weinmueller won the Best 

Miniature Award for his minia 

ture horseman's knife. Knife 

Highlights: Blades/tools 

are ATS-34 and include 

a hoof pick, corkscrew, 

leather punch and 

screwdriver. A tooth- /£ 

pick and tweezers / 

are in the stag han- j 

die. Closed length: | 

2 1/4 inches. The 

maker's list price for a similar piece: 

$850. Other models he offers: High-end 

folders and some hunters. (BladeGallery. 

com knife photo) 




4 






X 



A 



j" 



BEST OF SHOW/BEST FANTASY Jack Levin 
won both the Best Of Show and Best Fantasy 
Knife Awards for his Blade-bow. Highlights: 
Combination knife and crossbow w/a bayonet 
that opens from the bottom side and a sliding-lock 
mechanism that can provide up to 200 pounds of 
pressure. Other models Jack offers: Stilettos, dirks, 
bowies and hunting swords. His annual output: One 
or two Blade-bows, about six knives and some hunting 
swords. Sales: Contact the maker for more information. Fu- 
ture projects: Modified versions of the Blade-bow with a new 
bow-adjustment mechanism and the knife sporting a new- 
concept horizontal lock with button, which can be installed 
for right- and left-hand use. The entire knife will have only 
two screws. Jack also plans to explore selling his knives at 
international art auctions. (Point Seven knife photo) 



118 /BLADE 



blademag.com 



FEBRUARY 2006 



New Categories, Rules 
Changes For 2006 

In an effort to make the BLADEhand- 
made™ Awards as reflective of the best 
knives and to make the honors as relevant 
as possible, two rules changes are in effect 
for 2006. 

The first change pertains to the award 
categories, which have been changed to 
the following: Best Art Knife, Best Fixed 
Blade, Best Folding Knife, Best Tactical 
Folder, Best Utility Hunting Knife, Best 
Damascus Knife, Best Fighter, Best Bow- 
ie/Camp Knife, Best Sword and Best Min- 
iature. Categories dropped from inclusion 
are Best In Show, Best Fantasy and Best 
Non-Damascus Handforged Knife. They 
have been replaced by Best Tactical Folder, 
Best Bowie/Camp Knife and Best Sword. 

In addition, it will no longer be the to- 
tal number of knives entered overall in the 
judging competition at each show that will 
count toward the points awarded for each 
award category. Instead, it will be the total 
number of the show's exhibiting makers 
entering the show's judging competition 
that will count toward the points for each 
award category. 



those listed with this year's winners. 
The knifemaker with the most points 
in each category won the BLADEhand- 
made Award for that category. 



"I find that if I 

make what I want, 

I've got a freer 

rein, I enjoy it 

more and I 

think my knives 

reflect that and 

look better in the 

long run." 
— Mike Williams 



Points for each category were deter- 
mined by how many knives were entered 
by all knifemaker entrants in the judg- 
ing competition at each show. The more 
knives entered by all knifemaker en- 
trants at a participating show, the more 
points for each BLADEhandmade cat- 
egory that show provided.* In addition, 
the more times a knifemaker won the 
same BLADEhandmade category at par- 




Purveyors and Collectors 
ART KNIFE OFFERING 

Why do purveyors and collectors buy knives from 
me? Because I search the field constantly for the 
best in art knives: at major knife shows, on the 
web, collectors' estates, eBay, and directly from 
makers. I buy only the best. I also work with master 
makers co-designing singular knives. 

This year's winners: Best Art Knife Collaboration at 

the 2005 Blade Show and the Cronk Award at the 

2005 Guild Show. 

Several times a year, I search my personal collection of over 400 knives (I 

simply can't resist the artistry and buy too many knives). I select 50 to 70 

knives I am no longer madly in love with and place these knives on my Web 

site. I buy right. I sell right. 

People say I have an eye for art knives of enduring aesthetic value. This 
year, knives from my collection were chosen to appear on two Blade 
Magazine covers. I know quality assures lasting financial value. 

I add 60 or so knives to my Web site three or four times a year, then I send 
an e-mail notice to my secure list of collectors and purveyors. Do you want 
to be on my e-mail list? Simply e-mail your request to me. Good things are 
coming up. Don Guild 

GET ON MY LIST NOW 

don@guildknives.com 

www.GUILDKNIVES.com 




REPRESENTING 

THE OPPORTUNITY 

OF 

A LIFETIME 

FOR THE 

DISCRIMINATING 

COLLECT 




DAVID 
ELLIS 



ABS MASTERSMITH 
PURVEYOR 

380 S. Melrose Dr, ste 407 
Vista, CA 92081 

Daytime Ph: (760) 643-4032 Evening Ph: (760) 945-7177 
E-mail: ellis@mastersmith.com 



FEBRUARY 2006 



blademag.com 



BLADE/ 119 



>ULTRALIGHTS T 



> 
39 




WITH OUR 

TALON™ 
BLADE 



m 
c/> 



Available in th 

following blade 

lengths. 

Eagle 4" 

Falcon 3.15 " 

Hawk 2.75" 



www.almarknives.com 



ALMAR 



AL MAfl KNIVES P.O. BOX 2295 TUALATIN.OH 97062 

PHONE 503-670-9080 

WWW.ALMARKNIVES.COM 









lerry Christmas 
& Happy New Year 

from the 

Ranch 

'Ed FOWl< 



BEST FIGHTER Joe Flournoy won 
the Best Fighter Award for his Pos- 
sum Fighter. Knife highlights: The knife 
is the first sub hilt Joe made in 15 years. 
His list price for a similar piece: $850. Other 
models he offers: Small personal carry knives, 
tomahawks and locking-liner folders. His annual 
output: 30-35 pieces. Sales: No longer accepts 
custom orders (four-year waiting list); sells knives at 
shows (BLADE Show, Arkansas Custom Knife Show 
and Spirit Of Steel Show); and his knives also are 
available through purveyors (contact Joe for more 
information). Future outlook: Selling more knives in 
damascus, ivory and stag. (Point Seven knife photo) 



ticipating knife shows, the more points 
the knifemaker earned toward winning 
the BLADEhandmade Award for that 
category. (*Editor's note: See the sidebar 
on page 119 for new rules changes for the 
2006 BLADEhandmade Awards.) 

The shows participating in the 2005 
BLADEhandmade Awards program were 
the Greater Ohio Valley Knife Show; 
the Arizona Knife Collectors Show; 
Badger Knife Show; Arkansas Custom 
Knife Show; Knife Expo 2005; Oregon 
Knife Collectors Association Show; the 
BLADE Show; and BLADE Show West. 

How To Enter 

Any and all knife shows that wish to par- 
ticipate in the BLADEhandmade Awards 
program are encouraged to do so. If your 
show would like to participate, contact 
BLADE, attn: Joe Kertzman, 700 E. 
State St., Iola, WI 54990 715.445.2214 
blademagazine@krause.com for more 
details. 

For the contact information for the 
winners, see "Where To Get 'Em" on 
page 95. 



120 /BLADE 



blademag.com 



FEBRUARY 2006 



with Help from the Experts 



RL APE'S GuideT 




The Complete Handbook 
of Knife Collecting 



Blade's Guide to Knives & Weir Values 

Edited by Steve Shackleford 

This newly revamped knife guide is up-to-date and packed from cover 
to cover with expert insight. Exactly what you need to keep your knife 
collection and knife knowledge in check! Thousands of knives and 
their values, updated values for many knives created since the early 
19th century through today, and more than 2,000 photos of knives 
from around the world are included in this exciting book. 

This guide contains the most comprehensive listing anywhere of 
existing knifemakers and knife purveyors, with contact information. 
Plus, all the best knowledge and history BLADE magazine Cutlery 
Hall-of-Famer © Bernard Levine offered in earlier editions is featured. 
It is the essential guide for any knife collector and craftsman. 

Packed with information from the experts, in this book you get 
completely revamped value information from: 

• Pete Cohan and Richard E. White on antique knives 

• Dave Ellis on Loveless and Moran knives 

• Larry Oden and Joe Houser on Buck knives 

• Bill Claussen on military, exotic, international, kitchen and 
other knives 

• Rhett Stidham on Randall knives 

• Dr. James Lucie and Gordon White on Scagel knives 

It's easy-to-use, completely updated, and the most comprehensive 
knife value guide you'll find! 

Softcover • 8-1/2 x11» 576 pages 

2,000 b&w photos 

ltem#LGK6» $29.99 



"Knife collecting is a branch of treasure 
hunting. Similar to digging for pirate gold, 
searching for knives offers the challenge 
of the hunt, the thrill of discovery, and the 
concrete reward of the treasure itself." 

— From the Introduction 



Call To Order Today 

800-258-0929 

Offer KWHK 

M-F 7 am-8 pm, Sat. 
8am-2pmCDT 



Mail Your Order and payment to PO Box 5009, 
Iola, WI 54945. Mention Offer KWHK 

Go Online to www.krausebooks.com to place 
an order and view our entire line of books 

KP Books is an imprint of 
F+W Publications, Inc. 




The Balisong #11 by 
Charles J. "Chuck" 
Gedraitis is highlighted 
by a spear-point blade of 
Bob Eggerllng mosaic da- 
mascus. The folder has handles 
of gold-lip mother-of-pearl faceted 
to give them "another dimension." 
(SharpByCoop.com photo) 



By BLADE® staff 



Butterfly Art 

V^ flnrlpQitic Raliennn ttll nnac 



Spec Check 



Knife Balisong #11 

Maker Charles J. "Chuck" Gedraitis 

Blade Steel Bob Eggerling mosaic 

damascus 

Blade Length 3 3/4" 

Blade Grind/Shape Flat/spear 

Handles Gold-lip mother-of-pearl 

Liners Titanium anodized blue 

Latch Turkish-twist damascus 

Maker's List Price For a Similar 

Piece $1,500 



122 /BLADE 



Gedraitis' Balisong tt ll presents a 
Folding genre in a diFFerent light 



When most non-knife people con- 
sider butterfly knives, they think 
of gang warfare and other unsa- 
vory stuff. To adjust their attitudes, such 
folks should consider Charles J. "Chuck" 
Gedraitis' Balisong #11. 

Anchored by a flat-ground, spear-point 
blade of Bob Eggerling mosaic damascus, 
the folder has handles of gold-lip mother- 
of-pearl faceted to give them "another di- 
mension." The front and rear bolsters are 
a raindrop damascus by Al May. The tita- 



nium liners are anodized a bright blue and 
the spacers are fully fileworked, as are the 
heat-colored screws. The latch is Turkish- 
twist damascus. 

For more information contact Charles 
J. "Chuck" Gedraitis, Dept. BL2, 444 
Shrewsbury St., Holden, MA 01520 
508.963.1861 cgknives.blademakers.com, 
http://cgknives@blademakers.com. 



blademag.com 



FEBRUARY 2006 








Every sword manufactured 

by Windlass Steelcrafts™for 

Museum Replicas, is meticulously 

crafted to faithfully capture the 

attributes required by the 

soldiers and knights from 

centuries long ago. Light in 

weight, proper dimensions, 

and of course, balance and 

toughness are all qualities we 

take pride in delivering in 

every blade. These are the 

swords that history's greatest 

men-at-arms would be 

proud to own! 

Call toll-free today for your 

free catalog of Swords, Armor 
and Period Clothing 



r j r > rnusEum REPLICAS 



i rn i T e 

P.O. Box 840 / BL-13 
Conyers, GA 30012 



D 



Tel: 800-883-8838 
www.museumreplicas.com 

Dealer Inquiries Welcome 




Don't settle for 
decorative Fantasy 
cutlery with 420 
stainless steel 

blades 
and no edge. CAS 
Fantasy Cutlery will 
slay you with its 
functionality, 
wicked sharp 

edges and styling. 
See our website for 
more details. 



source code # M0BL05L 



IN STOCK, ORDER TODAY!! 

http://www.casiberia.com j 423.332.4700 



The CAS Logo, CAS name, are property of CAS Iberia, Inc. and cannot be used without written permission. © & ® 2003-2005 CAS Iberia, Inc.